Hypertension anyone?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by iBlazed, Apr 12, 2014.

  1. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #1
    I have a serious health issue. I'm 25 and I have very severe hypertension. The other day my blood pressure got to 170/114. I'm extremely concerned. I have constant headaches and shortness of breath when I exert myself even a little bit. I went to see the cardiologist yesterday because this seems to be beyond my primary care doctor's expertise. He scheduled me for a stress test in a few weeks and ordered blood work to be done, but my EKG showed a normal heart rhythm. I'm not overweight, couple of extra pounds in the gut I could lose but nothing major. I don't smoke, I barely drink, no coffee ever. I've been on 3 different medications that have not helped, the cardiologist doesn't want to put me on a new one until he has my blood work results. I really hope he can get down to the root cause of my blood pressure, I hope I don't have a heart problem. Also worth mentioning my parents both also have hypertension, but their medications work for them. Is anyone else dealing with this and what is your treatment method? I hope there's a cure one day...
     
  2. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #2
    There are a number of medications available to control hypertension. There are some dietary changes that might be recommended by your doc, too.

    While hypertension is a significant issue, the treatments are most often quite effective. Getting yourself stressed out, while understandable, is not helping you. Work closely with your doc, take any meds prescribed scrupulously, follow any dietary changes recommended...and, for the moment, take a deep breath and don't work this too hard in your head. I'd suggest doing something distracting for the nonce, and possibly avoid reading this thread all day as it will only keep your stress level up.

    As with all posts requesting medical information on this Forum, I would suggest that any specific advice offered, no matter how well intentioned, should be taken with a grain of salt (wait! your doc might recommend avoiding salt!).:)
     
  3. iBreatheApple macrumors 68020

    iBreatheApple

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    #3
    It can be a number of things that only a clinician can assess in person. That said, how much sodium are you taking in? If you are guilty of eating chips, crackers and the like frequently, the sodium content will absolutely increase your BP.
     
  4. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #4
    If his BP is that bad, it's unlikely due to sodium intake. Exercise is probably the best medicine.
     
  5. iBlazed thread starter macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #5
    Haha, yeah the grain of salt definitely won't help. I must admit, my diet can use some changes, and I can lose about 10-15 pounds. However, being that my diet hasn't changed in a long time and I had blood work done about a year ago and my sodium level was totally normal, it gives me the impression it's not totally food related. The cardiologist told me that for every 20lb. that a male loses, his blood pressure decreases by 10 points. That would bring me down to 160/104 at a high point. Still really bad. I can't help but picture the worst case scenario in my head where I have a heart problem and need surgery, but I know I'm just being paranoid.
     
  6. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #6
    While excessive sodium intake may exacerbate an extant condition, it is unlikely that too much salt, per se, would cause clinical hypertension in a 25 year old absent other, more significant, factors.

    Probably best to let OP's doc direct any dietary recommendations.
     
  7. iBlazed thread starter macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #7
    It really depends on the day. However, I have noticed that my blood pressure spikes do not coincide with days I eat more sodium than normal.
     
  8. AustinIllini macrumors demi-god

    AustinIllini

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    #8
    Yeah, the BP/Sodium evidence is pretty terrible (it's a theory, at this point with very little evidence). My best non-medical advice is to check it every day. You'll find that you get nervous when you get the cuff on. If you monitor it, your readings will be more accurate. Diet wise, do what your doctor says.
     
  9. iBlazed thread starter macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #9
    I do monitor daily, it's become very routine for me. It's gotten to the point where I can physically feel it when it starts to get high before I even test it. I'm just curious what meds other people are on for this and what works for them, which was my main purpose behind this thread. I've tried metoprolol, carvidelol, and the water pill. None of which have worked. I wonder what the next one will be. I'm only 25 and playing with my dog for 5 minutes makes me short of breath and spikes my blood pressure, it's very upsetting. It's debilitating right now.
     
  10. easy-peasy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2014
    #10
    Just curious OP, has you BP always run high? does hypertension run in your family?

    I might recommend getting a blood pressure monitor to check a couple times a day (say the morning when you first wake up, lunchtime when you have sat down and relaxed, and nighttime when you are about to sleep). You could find them on Amazon for $40-50.

    p.s. great job on getting it checked out as too many patients I've seen ignore it when it could get taken care of much easier by doing things like you are! :)
    ROFL! too funny :p
     
  11. iBlazed thread starter macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #11
    It's been high for a couple of years now. As I mentioned, both of my parents have it and I do monitor it daily.
     
  12. iBreatheApple, Apr 12, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2014

    iBreatheApple macrumors 68020

    iBreatheApple

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    #12
    Clinical hypertension is ~140/90 and while the OP's pressure is higher than that, it is very possible that a BP of 140/90 (clinical hypertension) is the result of nothing more than a bad diet.

    Again, OP, all anyone here can do is theorize. You need to follow up and you've already started that process so good job. Hopefully all is good. :)

    Lol, you think too much sodium in a diet leading to an elevated BP is a theory? Or are you just implying that the theory that this is the case for the OP is just that, a theory.

    I agree. Also, the fact that the OP has family history on both sides isn't too promising. :/
     
  13. easy-peasy macrumors regular

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    Jan 31, 2014
    #13
    I'm sure you've done your own research already but just so you know the American Heart Association recommends that you seek medical treatment right away for BP that high (also known as a "hypertensive crisis" for those in the healthcare field):
    http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Condi...ive-Crisis_UCM_301782_Article.jsp#mainContent
     
  14. iBlazed thread starter macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #14
    Yeah, I know 170/114 is abnormally high. But it's not always that high. It's usually around 150/100 and when I went to the cardiologist yesterday he got a reading of 140/100.
     
  15. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #15
    I take Lisinopril, Metoprolol, and Amlodipine to control my blood pressure, plus Furosemide, to deal with excess fluid accumulation. With these meds, my BP is usually in the 110/60 range. Without it, my BP would probably be around 180/110 on a "good" day and my lungs would soon fill up with fluids, etc.

    I'm 60. When I was in my late 20s I'd have occasionally high BP reading, but every doctor I asked about it brushed it off. As I aged, my BP keep getting higher and higher and still I was told not to worry about it, until I was diagnosed with congestive heart failure, three years ago. Unfortunately, the damage to my heart from years of overwork can't be undone at this point in the game.

    So while you're still young, find yourself a heart specialist and follow his/her advice.
     
  16. iBlazed thread starter macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #16
    Just curious, why do your lungs fill up with fluids from high blood pressure?

    This is what I fear most, which is why I definitely want to take care of it now. But I also feel like crap on an almost daily basis because of it already.
     
  17. alent1234 macrumors 603

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    Jun 19, 2009
    #17
    i had something like this almost 15 years ago

    stopped eating too much carbs, stop eating out most of the time and start exercising
     
  18. noisycats macrumors 6502a

    noisycats

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    #18
    Hopefully your primary care doc has excluded other causes of hypertension. If not I'm sure your cardiologist will. There are a variety of hormonal situations that cause hypertension including your thyroid gland and your adrenal glands or kidney abnormalities. Nothing to stress about at present other than continue getting a full work up.
     
  19. easy-peasy macrumors regular

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    #19
    High BP can eventually lead to the heart muscle weakening since it has to keep pumping against such high pressure to keep the blood circulating through your body. As the hearts pumping becomes less effective, fluid can then back up into other areas if the body (such as the lungs) aka congestive heart failure. Probably why localoid is taking Lasix to help make sure they get rid of excess fluid so it doesn't back up in the lungs.
     
  20. localoid macrumors 68020

    localoid

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    #20
    In my case, it's due to the left ventricle of my heart being unable to "keep up" (the left ventricle is my "failed" component of CHF), so fluid backs up into my lungs. See: pulmonary edema

    I've never been overweight, but I rapidly gained 40+ pounds just before I was diagnosed with CHF, all from excess fluids. I had so much fluid in my lungs I felt like I was drowning. Once I was prescribed the "water pills" I spent my of my time peeing, for several days...

    I really didn't notice "feeling like crap" until I turned 50. Then, suddenly I would get winded quickly. I was taking brisk walks or 3-4 miles daily, and suddenly it was becoming harder and harder to do. I could easily lift, say 100 lbs., but couldn't sustain the lift, etc.

    My doctors all said this was normal, something I should expect at about that age. I should have gone shopping for other doctors much earlier. I actually think part of my problem was that I looked too healthy. I wasn't overweight, was getting regular exercise, etc. And, I had "social anxiety disorder" related problems when I was young, so some doctors felt that my elevated BP was somehow connected to that and at that point, they'd stop looking for physical causes of my high BP.

    Even now, when I go to a doctor (on a non-heart related problem) they sometimes ask "You seem too young for CHF -- where did you get the idea that you have CHF?", and I have to "prove" my condition to them.

    You're much younger, so some doctors might dismiss thoughts of heart problems. I'd recommend shopping around for a specialist. There are some tests, some of which aren't all that expensive, that can be performed. I have a friend that has "anxiety problems" which would elevate his BP a good bit, and he finally found a doctor that could help him deal with his fear that he was having a heart attack, via counseling and medication. So I guess my point is whatever the cause, seek out a specialist that you feel comfortable with and can trust, etc.
     
  21. Fzang macrumors 65816

    Fzang

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    #21
    Unhealthy lifestyle doesn't necessarily have to show in terms of visible overweight. I could probably replace all my meals with cake without gaining much weight, if any at all, but that doesn't mean that I'm immune to diet-related problems.

    "I could probably lose the extra 10-15 pounds I carry around, but I mean, it's not like it's 30 pounds"

    What's with the excuses? Be serious about your condition or don't.
     
  22. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #22
    The only advice is to seek out medical attention that can help. If you primary physician is not getting a handle on it, then look for another doctor.

    Diet, exercise, and medication can all have a positive contribution to getting Hypertension under control. I don't think there ever will be a cure, but the medication available now a days help control it
     
  23. Plutonius macrumors 603

    Plutonius

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  24. FelixDerKater macrumors 68000

    FelixDerKater

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    #24
    Do you eat a lot of foods high in Magnesium? If not, this can help.
     
  25. Avatar74 macrumors 65816

    Avatar74

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    #25
    A full battery of tests including MRI/sonogram to evaluate any abnormalities, as well as bloodwork (e.g. lipid panel, triglycerides, etc. to assess risk) provide an experienced cardiologist with the data points they need to make a reasoned determination of what your treatment plan should be, including medication, exercise, dietary changes, etc.
     

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