I bought the Watch for what happened last night

Ntombi

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I have MS and a couple of other medical issues, including a severely injured knee with nerve damage down the leg. All of that leads to mobility issues and a high risk of falling.

For various reasons, I had no interest in the Apple Watch until fall detection (and the EKG/advanced heart monitoring stuff) was announced, but with that, I realized it could be of great benefit to me, as I live alone. I’ve had a couple of bad falls when I was alone, and the Watch was announced right when I realized I had to be proactive.

Last night, I fell pretty hard, thanks to a minuscule crack in the sidewalk. I’m scraped and bruised, and will be hurting for a while, but fine. The good news? The Apple Watch did exactly what I bought it to do, detected my fall, and asked if I needed help. I dismissed the call, and then it asked if I had actually fallen, or if it was a false alarm.

This morning, I remembered to check my Health app, and there it was: 1 fall. This will also help me track falls for my appointments, which I hadn’t previously thought of.

Adrenaline is a funny thing: it looks like I dismissed it within a few seconds; it felt much longer.

I’ve since found many other great uses for the watch, but honestly, this alone is worth it for me.

BFDDC784-E986-4031-8C1C-8D4099464A3F.jpeg
 

oeagleo

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Feb 5, 2016
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West Jordan, Utah
Wow, I didn't realize that it would actually track falls, but that's a good thing. I too, went from a Series 3 to the 4 for the Fall detection, and ECG somewhat, being 70, and have on occasion taken a tumble. I'm a bit more cautious now, because of my age, and am grateful to know that the watch is there, standing by should I need it.
 

tl01

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Jun 20, 2010
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I’m glad it tracked your fall and sorry that you fell. I work with a group of people who could really use the watch because of fall issues...and it think for that reason it is really very helpful. And young healthy people can fall too...it’s korw rare but you never know!
 
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Newtons Apple

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Mar 12, 2014
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Please be warned that the Apple Watch will not detect all falls. It really depends on how’s hard the watch is stressed during the fall. I have had mine detect a fall multiple times when I just hit my arm on something.

It is a giant leap ahead and will help a lot of people.
 
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Ntombi

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Please be warned that the Apple Watch will not detect all falls. It really depends on how’s Hard the watch is stressed during the fall. I have had mine detect a fall multiple times when I just hit my arm of something.

It is a giant leap ahead and will help a lot of people.
Yeah, I’ve seen complaints about that, but it hasn’t happened to me. For my purposes, I’d rather it be more, rather than less, sensitive, but I absolutely get that it’s more annoying that way.
 
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Vanilla35

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Apr 11, 2013
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Please be warned that the Apple Watch will not detect all falls. It really depends on how’s hard the watch is stressed during the fall. I have had mine detect a fall multiple times when I just hit my arm on something.

It is a giant leap ahead and will help a lot of people.
Interestingly enough, mine triggered a fall detection for the first time the other day based on no fall at all, and not even from hitting it on anything. I was preparing my breakfast meal and moving from my ground height cabinet, to my freezer (lower compartment, slightly higher in elevation than cabinet), to the and then to my waist height counter top.

I guess the combination of that, alongside my arms going up and down in those compartments made it think I had fallen. I was surprised because I had it in do not disturb mode still from the night before and was getting frantic vibrations.
 
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Alameda

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Jun 22, 2012
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It's great to hear when technology helps improve the lives of people with physical impairments. I'm sure this makes the Apple Watch developers very happy as well.
 
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sean000

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Jul 16, 2015
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As an avid mountain biker who usually rides alone, I wonder if it will detect a bike crash like an endo? I don’t plan on finding out, but it would be a good thing if needed.
 

sean000

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Jul 16, 2015
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Most likely, those are a pretty violent "hit". Now, is there cell service where you crash, that is the question.. :)
True... fortunately I do most of my riding in places where there is plenty of cell reception. It's actually some of my road rides where it fades in and out. I'm a pretty chill trail rider when I'm out by myself (sometimes I'm even on my touring bike instead of my trail bike). We have some trails with big drops and man-made technical features that I tend to avoid. I'm not in it for the big thrills, but I do like to take downhill trails pretty fast sometimes (at least fast for me). I just keep my speed in check unless it's a trail I know. So I'm a pretty safe rider who hasn't crashed in many years (knock on wood) but I know it can happen in the blink of an eye if you aren't paying attention. As my daughter gets older and stronger I will take her trail riding with me more. I took her a couple of times this past Summer, but she thought it was too much pedaling uphill even though she had a great time on the downhill runs :p. She's only eight years old, so I figure I will try to keep it fun for her and just take her on flatter rides or to the pump track. It won't be long before I will be struggling to keep up with her.
 
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oeagleo

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Feb 5, 2016
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Just thinking, I wonder if the watch would register a "fall" over some of the bumpier sections of your trail. Something to watch for during your ride. Don't want an ambulance waiting for you at the bottom, or meet the paramedics on your way down.. LOL
 
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newellj

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Oct 15, 2014
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Please be warned that the Apple Watch will not detect all falls. It really depends on how’s hard the watch is stressed during the fall. I have had mine detect a fall multiple times when I just hit my arm on something.

It is a giant leap ahead and will help a lot of people.
This ^^^ and note that if you're under some age (60, I think?), fall detection is 'off' by default and must be turned on.

Five years ago I had a very serious fall on an icy trail while hiking alone and completely destroyed one shoulder. I was 55 at the time so fall detection would have been off unless I'd turned it on (I have). I was able to walk out (although essentially handicapped and in a great deal of pain), but things could have turned out differently for a lot of reasons. I don't think fall detection is an 'elderly' issue at all and I'm glad Apple has developed this as part of the AW.
 
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Ntombi

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This ^^^ and note that if you're under some age (60, I think?), fall detection is 'off' by default and must be turned on.
It’s off by default unless you’re >65. I get why, and basically, they picked an age where people wouldn’t feel insulted, I’m guessing.

That’s why I turned it on first thing. I’m significantly younger than 65, but well aware of my high fall risk.

I feel like most people who at a risk of falling (beyond just the bad luck everyone is privy to) will actively look to turn it on.
 

harriska2

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Mar 16, 2011
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It’s off by default unless you’re >65. I get why, and basically, they picked an age where people wouldn’t feel insulted, I’m guessing.

That’s why I turned it on first thing. I’m significantly younger than 65, but well aware of my high fall risk.

I feel like most people who at a risk of falling (beyond just the bad luck everyone is privy to) will actively look to turn it on.
My son is 22 and I turned it on for him (he has autism and fainting spells). Docs couldn’t find anything so I conned his dad into getting the watch as a precaution/peace of mind.
 

DontGetTheCheese

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Nov 22, 2015
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Completely agree on fall detection, not nearly as on-board with the heart stuff.

Also, because I do stupid, or risky stuff, being able to 911 is useful. Don’t need to pay the scam artists for network access just need the cell access.
 

DennisdeWit

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Nov 16, 2016
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Please note, if you have a doctor like mine, he’ll call this info ‘very useless’ and tells you he ‘doesn’t trust these gimmick equipments’.

Seems Apple made these kind of medical features all for nothing.
 

TheAppleFairy

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Mar 28, 2013
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Please note, if you have a doctor like mine, he’ll call this info ‘very useless’ and tells you he ‘doesn’t trust these gimmick equipments’.

Seems Apple made these kind of medical features all for nothing.

I'd get a new doctor. Technology has advanced medicine so far. He still working with a WWI medical bag?
 

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DennisdeWit

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I'd get a new doctor. Technology has advanced medicine so far. He still working with a WWI medical bag?
Without going too much off topic, he prefers ‘listening to your body with my own instruments and knowledge’.

I wanted to show him the heart rate messages I sometimes got, but got told he doesn’t want to see it as it ‘is clearly a regular measurement mistake and we shouldn’t believe these devices’ :)). As of today I still have heartrates around 157 sometimes (without doing anything exciting), but was told it’s some kind of hypochondria.

Well, doc knows best it seems.
 

TheAppleFairy

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Mar 28, 2013
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The Clinton Archipelago unfortunately
Without going too much off topic, he prefers ‘listening to your body with my own instruments and knowledge’.

I wanted to show him the heart rate messages I sometimes got, but got told he doesn’t want to see it as it ‘is clearly a regular measurement mistake and we shouldn’t believe these devices’ :)). As of today I still have heartrates around 157 sometimes (without doing anything exciting), but was told it’s some kind of hypochondria.

Well, doc knows best it seems.
There is nothing wrong with listening to the body. At the same time, we have tools to use at all times that can alert us of possible issues. Sure they are perfect, but they will improve.
 

DennisdeWit

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Nov 16, 2016
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There is nothing wrong with listening to the body. At the same time, we have tools to use at all times that can alert us of possible issues. Sure they are perfect, but they will improve.
True.

Also, I could see the fall detection come handy given the fact I have Menieres and used to have drop attacks. One of my fellow patients had such bad drop attacks, he ended up at the hospital with his head stitched. The Watch could be a real assist then.

I have the AW4 and really like it. First Watch ever for me.
 
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