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bxs

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 20, 2007
1,150
528
Seattle, WA
Subject: I wonder if the iMac Pro's SSD can be upgraded ?

Apple has stated the RAM can be upgraded, so I'm now wondering if the SSD can also be upgraded.

My understanding is that the SSD comprises of two small modules (smaller than any SSD Apple has placed in their previous Macs so far) that are coupled as RAID0 to provide a massive data rate of close to 4 GB/s.

Maybe when iFixit has done their tear down of the iMac Pro we will have some insights on this SSD upgradeability.

There's also the issue I believe that the SSD is somehow tied logically to its Mac Pro hardware in some fashion. So I wonder if SSD is indeed upgradeable how will this aspect be dealt with ?

Thoughts ?
 

Rockadile

macrumors 6502a
Jun 11, 2012
500
210
Subject: I wonder if the iMac Pro's SSD can be upgraded ?

Apple has stated the RAM can be upgraded, so I'm now wondering if the SSD can also be upgraded.

My understanding is that the SSD comprises of two small modules (smaller than any SSD Apple has placed in their previous Macs so far) that are coupled as RAID0 to provide a massive data rate of close to 4 GB/s.

Maybe when iFixit has done their tear down of the iMac Pro we will have some insights on this SSD upgradeability.

There's also the issue I believe that the SSD is somehow tied logically to its Mac Pro hardware in some fashion. So I wonder if SSD is indeed upgradeable how will this aspect be dealt with ?

Thoughts ?

As of now it's going to be difficult or impossible.

https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...erbolt-ports-questions.2095448/#post-25620139
 

bplein

macrumors 6502a
Jul 21, 2007
538
197
Austin, TX USA
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maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,682
43,718
There's also the issue I believe that the SSD is somehow tied logically to its Mac Pro hardware in some fashion. So I wonder if SSD is indeed upgradeable how will this aspect be dealt with ?
Apple solders the SSD onto the logic board for the 2016 and 2017 MBPs. I wouldn't be surprised if they did that for the iMac Pro.

Even if they didn't, opening up the iMac voids your warranty and any damage you incur as a result of the work will not be covered. It may be possible to upgrade the iMac Pro's storage, but given the high cost of the machine and the high risk of doing the upgrade, I'd say its not worth it - just my $02.
 

bxs

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 20, 2007
1,150
528
Seattle, WA
Apple solders the SSD onto the logic board for the 2016 and 2017 MBPs. I wouldn't be surprised if they did that for the iMac Pro.

Even if they didn't, opening up the iMac voids your warranty and any damage you incur as a result of the work will not be covered. It may be possible to upgrade the iMac Pro's storage, but given the high cost of the machine and the high risk of doing the upgrade, I'd say its not worth it - just my $02.

The RAM can be upgraded by Apple. I'm also wondering if Apple can also upgrade the SSD for a customer much like they can do for RAM in the same way. I'm not wanting to do this myself, and am sorry if somehow I conveyed that.
 

bxs

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 20, 2007
1,150
528
Seattle, WA
The team is user accessible - if it the same as the current iMac. There is no need to open up the iMac

"team" ... I'm confused about this word! In fact, I'm confuse with the complete response. Please clarify... thanks.:)
 

Bryan Bowler

macrumors 601
Sep 27, 2008
4,026
4,353
Even if they didn't, opening up the iMac voids your warranty and any damage you incur as a result of the work will not be covered.

Mike, this is not directed towards you. My response is to everyone. I'm just using your statement as one example of many.

Here in our forums, I often hear the misconception of "opening your iMac will automatically void the warranty". This statement is not true. The act of opening your iMac will not void your warranty, at least not in the United States.

In the United States, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975 states that a company cannot require you to replace/upgrade components with the company's own parts in order to retain the warranty. To do so would be illegal according to United States law. I cannot speak to other parts of the world. Please reference your own country's consumer protection laws.

There's a lot of legal talk in Apple's warranty, but getting down to the nuts and bolts at hand, Apple is simply saying that if you open your iMac and cause damage while doing so, then the warranty may not cover the repair. Also, if you use incompatible parts that end up causing damage to your system, then the warranty may not cover the repair.

As far as the warranty language that states "unless performed by Apple or an authorized Apple Repair facility", that is basically saying that damage will only be covered if it occurs from repairs or modifications by an Apple-trained technician. Apple does not have to warranty damage caused by Joe or Jane Schmoe. Makes sense to me.

All of the worry about "seals and tape" are mostly unfounded. Now, if you do not ground yourself properly and cause damage due to static discharge, or if you spill your Mountain Dew inside the machine, or if you do not disconnect a plug and rip it off and break it, then Apple can choose not to cover the repair. However, if you get a hold of the right training instructions and training videos, and use the right tools and follow the right protocols, and have reasonably steady hands and patience, it is not hard at all to open an iMac and get to most of the components. And the act of doing so will not void your warranty.

Hopefully this helps dispel some of the myths often associated with opening an iMac and performing upgrades.
 
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bxs

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Oct 20, 2007
1,150
528
Seattle, WA
Mike, this is not directed towards you. My response is to everyone. I'm just using your statement as one example of many.

Here in our forums, I often hear the misconception of "opening your iMac will automatically void the warranty". This statement is not true. The act of opening your iMac will not void your warranty, at least not in the United States.

In the United States, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975 states that a company cannot require you to replace/upgrade components with the company's own parts in order to retain the warranty. To do so would be illegal according to United States law. I cannot speak to other parts of the world. Please reference your own country's consumer protection laws.

There's a lot of legal talk in Apple's warranty, but getting down to the nuts and bolts at hand, Apple is simply saying that if you open your iMac and cause damage while doing so, then the warranty may not cover the repair. Also, if you use incompatible parts that end up causing damage to your system, then the warranty may not cover the repair.

As far as the warranty language that states "unless performed by Apple or an authorized Apple Repair facility", that is basically saying that damage will only be covered if it occurs from repairs or modifications by an Apple-trained technician. Apple does not have to warranty damage caused by Joe or Jane Schmoe. Makes sense to me.

All of the worry about "seals and tape" are mostly unfounded. Now, if you do not ground yourself properly and cause damage due to static discharge, or if you spill your Mountain Dew inside the machine, or if you do not disconnect a plug and rip it off and break it, then Apple can choose not to cover the repair. However, if you get a hold of the right training instructions and training videos, and use the right tools and follow the right protocols, and have reasonably steady hands and patience, it is not hard at all to open an iMac and get to most of the components. And the act of doing so will not void your warranty.

Hopefully this helps dispel some of the myths often associated with opening an iMac and performing upgrades.

Yes.... thank you for that. I have to say that iFixit is very helpful in showing how to open up things properly and with care for the general public at large. In addition other people will post pretty good descriptions for doing this as well.

I've been taking things apart and re-assmbling them since the age of 8 yrs old. You learn by doing...:):cool:

The one thing that has stopped me doing this at times is the lack of a 'special' tool that simply cannot be purchased/found. :(
 

maflynn

macrumors Haswell
May 3, 2009
73,682
43,718
Here in our forums, I often hear the misconception of "opening your iMac will automatically void the warranty". This statement is not true. The act of opening your iMac will not void your warranty, at least not in the United States.
yes I know that, but the fact remains if you open the computer and then down the road apple does warranty work on it, the issue will be difficult as Apple will say that damage is the cause. I understand that you are free to open the computer and will only be responsible for the component you worked on but in reality you are risking more, whether you're talking about dealing with the dispute of that, or just handling the cost of the repair because Apple denied the warranty claim.

To sumarize, technically opening it doesn't void the warranty, but in practice its a far more riskier proposition as you'll have prove your work didn't damage the computer to Apple
 

Bryan Bowler

macrumors 601
Sep 27, 2008
4,026
4,353
yes I know that, but the fact remains if you open the computer and then down the road apple does warranty work on it, the issue will be difficult as Apple will say that damage is the cause. I understand that you are free to open the computer and will only be responsible for the component you worked on but in reality you are risking more, whether you're talking about dealing with the dispute of that, or just handling the cost of the repair because Apple denied the warranty claim.

To sumarize, technically opening it doesn't void the warranty, but in practice its a far more riskier proposition as you'll have prove your work didn't damage the computer to Apple

I understand what you're saying, but Apple is one of the most lenient companies out there when it comes to leniency and great customer support. I'm just not sure how they could possibly pin something against someone if they didn't break it, nor do I think they would do this, in the vast majority of cases.

As a random example, if I carefully open an iMac Pro and install 128 GB of RAM and then one year later, the Vega 64 flakes out, Apple is not going to say I broke it when I installed the RAM a year earlier. I know there are a lot of different scenarios and not all are as clear-cut as this, but I just find it hard to believe that Apple (of all companies) is going to try and stick it to the customer.
 
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