Installing bootcamp problems

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by manmeet, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. manmeet macrumors member

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    Apr 6, 2009
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    India
    #1
    I purchased a XP CD for my mac.
    Everything went fine except one thing.
    I started installation and everything was fine.
    There was a window saying copying files from disc and when it was successful a window came saying that the computer will restart in 3 sec and so on and it further said that the setup will continue after restart and a window came and it it said press any key to boot from CD and after that it said, disk error and press any key to restart and I don't know what to do after that. pls help!
    And how to boot from mac to windows and vice versa.
     
  2. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #2
    Make sure the version of Windows XP is Service Pack 2.

    I'm not sure exactly what the boot issue could be, though. It sounds like the CD is still inserted and it's trying to boot from it. You can eject it by holding down the mouse/trackpad button on restart.

    To select which system to boot from, you can use Startup Disk (in OS-X, and in Windows after installing Boot Camp drivers), but I prefer to leave OS-X selected as the default [in Startup Disk], then select the system by holding down the option key on startup. With the option key held down, you'll be presented with a choice of bootable volumes.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. vermonter16 macrumors regular

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    Nov 19, 2008
    #3
    I'm having my own problems with bootcamp right now....alas, no responses. However - did you hit a key when it asked you if you wanted to boot from the disk? I did that and it gave me an error too.... But I really didn't want it to boot from the disk since I'd already loaded Windows on...not necessary. Maybe if that's what you did - just don't boot from the disk.
     
  4. manmeet thread starter macrumors member

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    India
    #4
    AMMM....I got the solution, we have to format FAT first but the real problem is 25 digit product key which is present in the CD in the 1358 folder named unattend which is not valid!
     
  5. nullx86 macrumors 6502a

    nullx86

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    #5
    Boot camp is really simple...

    XP SP2 or Vista/Win7. Must be retail, NO OEM!

    Restart, Hold option on boot, select your disk, install on the volume labeled boot camp, install drivers, restart.

    When installing XP, format as NTFS.
     
  6. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #6
    Just to clarify: Do not expect to be able to use your customized OEM install disc from a Dell/HP/Toshiba/etc... manmeet must be trying to use such a disc otherwise it would not have the product key in the 1358 folder for an unattended install.

    That said, I and may others have used fresh, generic OEM/OEI/System Builder media (i.e. the stuff you can buy at NewEgg) to install on our Macs with the understanding that we are fully responsible for support and get no support from Microsoft or Apple, and that our license is not transferable to another PC. I have also successfully used "retail upgrade" media as indicated in a LONG old thread.

    If you have properly formatted, bootable media you should be able to do just as nullx86 says, hold option and boot. Note that on some very early Intel Macs like my original Core Duo 17" iMac, option doesn't work on some keyboard combinations (like the #&$*^%$*& Aluminum keyboard from Apple), so you may have to use the remote (if you have one) or some other method of reaching the boot selector.

    B
     
  7. nullx86 macrumors 6502a

    nullx86

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    #7

    Thanks for adding on, I think I should've mentioned that...

    hmm, thats odd that your 17" iMac doesnt work with the Aluminium keyboard... My 24" works just fine with it... Another way of getting to boot via a different OS is by going to Ulilities and selecting your startup disk (startup disk being either your windows install disk or your bootcamp partition).
     
  8. manmeet thread starter macrumors member

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    India
    #8
    Thanks, so what should I do, I have uninstalled currently!
     
  9. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #9
    Start with a plain vanilla install disc that is not customized for unattended install, for a specific OEM or anything like that. as nullx86 said, using the boxed retail version, non-upgrade edition, of XP with SP2 is almost a guarantee of success. Alternatively, using a generic System Builder's disc will work too. I don't know where you can get either thing in India though....

    Once you have the right disc there is very little that can go wrong. The most common roadblocks are: Not having SP2 or later already included (although you can usually get around that by slipstreaming), not having a bootable CD (sometimes you can make a bootable cd from the one you have by following the CD mastering parts of a slipstreaming guide) and last using a CD customized for a specific hardware platform obviously other than a Mac).

    From you description you have one of the customized CDs, and as you have found removing the customization can be difficult since the customization process itself is not designed or intended to be reversible.

    B
     
  10. bcsarmaa macrumors newbie

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    Oct 14, 2009
    #10
    My bootcamp problem - I might be able to help you

    I have a similar, if not the exact same problem as you seem to have...

    I purchased a copy of XP Pro via eBay (yep, that's how these things usually start). It is a full OEM version and includes the license key.

    I went through the bootcamp installation proces, one important thing - I nevr was shown a screen where I should select between FAT32,NTFS, or to keep the current file system. I had chosen a partition size of 70 GB so NTFS is required, but I assumed the install automatically chose it for me. Went through the copying files process, recieved several errors on drivers related to WMPlayer - finally got through those. On restart I got the dreaded disk error problem.

    After much research I've concluded that I have a couple of problems on my hand:
    1) There are some versions of XP discs that will never let you choose the file system that you want to setup for your partition. Because this never happens the partition is never properly formatted and thus the OS does not install properly. If this happens its probably because of the disc you are using. You can try another disc (but who wants to pay money after you already LEGALLY purchased a license that didn't work?).

    The other solution is to basically recreate the windows install disc by copying the contents to your hard drive, removing one specific file and then creating a bootable disc. Note this is a lengthy process and somewhat technical - the full instructions are here... Follow the instructions that make up the third bullet point on the linekd article - you'll need access to a Windows machine with Roxio Easy CD Creator on it for this to work properly.

    I followed these instructions and restarted the bootcamp install process - this time I could select between the files system formats (EXCELLENT - I thought). When it went into the actual install I still had errors with dll files that could not be found - but I got to the windows logo and the time zone setup. After going through all of that (1.5 hours into everything) I suddenly got an error saying that internet could not be configured because of a missing file. The system reboots but it is basically in safemode (no background - just blue color). I put the Mac OS disc in to update the drivers, and the disc is unable to install anything because important .dll files are missing.

    Thus I have a half-baked install of Windows with no functionality. If you are unlucky as me it is because of my second problem:

    #2 - the disk I have is also corrupted or there is some defect. Important system files are not readable and are not able to be copied during install.

    So my final option is to try and catalog each system file error, find the .dll files and create a new bootable disc - if anyone has an easier way around this or could offer advice on how to get past this I would really appreciate it.
     
  11. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #11
    EDIT: This is why Apple only supports retail discs! I do not believe that any DVDs ship from Microsoft with a WINNT.SIF for unattended install, so the provenance and legality of these discs is questionable. i remember back in the days where computer parts shows were still popular you could often get OEM discs Windows that were obviously leftovers from a major manufacturer, i.e. they had been customized for Toshiba or IBM etc... and were being resold really cheap after the product they were customized for was scrapped. While cheap they are not a good value since they usually don't work well on anything but the hardware platform they were customized for.

    I had this problem once and fixed it by burning the disc as slowly as possible. Turn down the burn speed as much as you can and you should be fine. If the original disc you have bought from eBay has this problem you got a bum disc and should take it up with the seller or get a replacement from MS.

    B
     
  12. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    Munich, Germany
    #12
    System builder OEM disks are technically identical to full retail disks. The only difference is the 90 days support which you don't get. If you have system builder edition asured and pay via paypal you can purchase on ebay without risk. The seller must supply a functional disk or Paypal will give you the money back. Just make sure you have the system builder spec in writing. MS even supplies 32/64 bit switches for Vista and Seven for SBE owners. You just pay a fee for pressing and shipping the DVD.

    Switching a SBE to another computer is also no problem, at least in the EU. You are legally entitled to run the license on any one computer. If you decide to have it on another computer you can go through a telefone activation. This process is even automated in most countries. You do not have to speak to a representative. Just input numbers into the phone and into your Mac.
     
  13. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #13
    Agreed, but that's not what these guys appear to be buying. Once the disc has been customized for unattended install or so that you don't need to enter your product key it has ceased to be technically identical to a full retail disc.

    B
     
  14. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    #14
    Agreed. Those Recovery disks (as we call them) are pretty useless unless you are damn good with vLite and nLite.
     
  15. Nordichund macrumors 6502

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    Aug 21, 2007
    Location:
    Oslo, Norway
    #15
    Just for the record I bought a new OEM Windows XP disc in 2007 and installed it on my new iMac. I then returned the iMac due to the dreaded gradient issue THREE TIMES.

    After installing the same OEM disc on all three machines. I then installed the same disc on a 2008 Mac Pro I bought instead. Except for a few telephone calls to Microsoft to explain the situation, and get a new license key, I had NO problems, except for the keyboard issue. I think I unplugged my mighty mouse when installing XP to get that to work.

    Saying all that, I now have Windows 7 running in Boot Camp. Given the choice today after experiencing Windows 7. I wouldn't install XP ever again even if you paid me. XP really has been outdated, big time. However I still prefer working in OS X.
     
  16. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    #16
    I'm actually surprised they always gave you a new key. It really isn't necessary and isn't good for you. You should have kept the product key that is on your COA sticker. The sticker is your legal proof of license ownership. You can use the license on as many machines as you wish as long as it is only on one machine at a given time.

    XP was a pretty big hit for MS as Windows OSes go. It made money for eight or nine years. Of course it is a bit long in the teeth now. Vista in my view was better than it's reputation and I don't see that many features of Seven that are superior to Vista.
     
  17. Nordichund macrumors 6502

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    Aug 21, 2007
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    Oslo, Norway
    #17
    I did keep the original COA sticker and used the key printed on it to install XP. But when it came to registering XP online a popup box would appear telling me that I needed to contact Microsoft, which I did.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe Microsoft's rules are if you buy a retail version of Windows then you can move it from one machine to another, if you uninstall it first. If the version is OEM, I believe it states that it is only allowed to be used for the original machine the disc is supposed to come with.
     
  18. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #18
    That's what your minimum rights are per the EULA, but what constitutes the original hardware? Windows Activation looks are something like 5 major hardware components, the CPU, HDD, Video Card, Network Adapter, and RAM. Once you change "too many" of those components, it will ask you to reactivate.

    At which point it is Microsoft's decision whether they want to let you reactivate online automatically, or have you call in. And when you call in, hey can do what they did to you and give you a new key. As I understand it they do this so they can retire your old key, just in case it was stolen or otherwise misused. They are fully within their rights per the EULA to give you MORE than your minimum rights,

    The rules are so silly that it used to be that to buy an OEM license pack you had to buy it with hardware so NewEgg and others would bundle a power cord with the CD. By keeping the power cord with successive machines you were comlpying with the EULA. :rolleyes:

    B
     
  19. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    #19
    I'm not sure about the legal state of bundling hardware and software in the US. In the EU it is not allowed, hence the EULA is invalid for us Europeans. It probably is for the USA as well.

    The only legal difference between OEM and Retail versions is the right of the retail customer to receive MS support. OEM customers do not have that.

    Technically a true OEM software may have means to stop you transferring it to another machine of different brand or at least make it very difficult. This has no legal implications though. We call this kind of Windows disk a Recovery disk. If it is fitted to the right machine you do not have to know a product key and you do not have to activate it.

    There is also the type of OEM Windows which officially is called System Builder Edition. SBE is technically identical with Retail. You just don't pay for the MS support which typically cuts the price to between 20-60% of the full retail version depending of the state of re use. A used SBE with COA sticker is typically a good buy. You have to call an automated telefone service to re activate it but you usually get very good value for money.
     
  20. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #20
    The requirement was removed for unused SBE licenses from the last System Builders License I read and so NewEgg and others stopped the practice some time ago. Here is NewEgg's current interpretation.

    EDIT: Below was my interpretation as of the last time I read into this, things have changed at least in the US. Microsoft has clarified their position and intent for hobbyists here: http://oem.microsoft.com/script/contentpage.aspx?pageid=563841 as NewEgg says it, it is intended for resale to a third-party only.

    There are two documents to read before you go with an OEM/SBE license on your Mac. The System Builders License and the End User License Agreement. They define your rights and responsibilities, and vary from country to county and language to language.

    There are three significant things to keep in mind when buying OEM/SBE licenses of Windows in the US. Look for them in the current SBL/EULA. Find and read the current versions if you want to figure out your rights and responsibilities.

    1) No upgrade installs. While many of us LIKE it that way, typically the System Builder Edition versions I have bought will NOT upgrade an existing install. You need to install fresh and migrate your files over. This is a significant difference from retail media, full or upgrade versions, and can be important enough for some folks to fork out the extra cash for a retail edition. It can be as simple as moving c:\windows to c:\windows.old or may involve reformatting the target partition.

    2) In the US at least, the System Builder takes on the responsibility to affix the COA sticker to said system and redistribute the software to an End User installed and with the system+the COA sticker. Thus, a used copy of SBE with the COA is probably being sold outside the SBL in the US. However, if unused, the license can be transferred to another System Builder which is how NewEgg and others do it.

    3) The End User gets no right to support from Microsoft (as gugucom already pointed out). The responsibility part of that equation is that the System Builder is responsible for End User support (see the NewEgg quote). So one could definitely interpret that as saying that if you install an SBE license on your Mac and sell it you are agreeing to provide end user support for the buyer of your system!

    Caveat Emptor.

    So, while the End User is not explicitly granted the right to transfer an OEM/SBE license to another machine, one could interpret the SBLA to allow for such transfers by the System Builder before the system is redistributed (with Windows installed and COA attached) to the End User. So what does it mean when the System Builder and End User are one and the same?

    B
     

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