Intel Active Management Technology (vPro) support for Apple?

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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TheRegister.co.uk reports that at a Core 2 Duo chipset launch yesterday, an Intel general manager suggested that there were discussions to bring Intel's Advanced Manageability Technologies in vPro to Apple machines.

Intel's vPro is detailed on their site. vPro is essentially a marketing initiative, targeted at business customers, and incoporates dual core 64-bit chips, virtualization, and Active Management Technology (iAMT).

iAMT provides management and security software embedded in the chipset of the machine -- outside the reach of the operating system. This article describes the capabilities of iAMT:

Thanks to iAMT system administrators will be able to remotely set up new computers, download software updates, perform asset inventories and find and fix many problems even when target systems are turned off, the operating system has locked up or the hard drive has failed.
Intel provides an overview on their site.
 

iMeowbot

macrumors G3
Aug 30, 2003
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Even if it's not full-blown iAMT (the idea of which may freak out private users), wake-on-LAN would be nicer if it could wake an "off" machine and not only a sleeper. Things can always be brought up to date at the next boot, but at least a better possibility to make things happen overnight would rule.
 

Doenertier

macrumors newbie
Sep 1, 2006
14
0
iMeowbot said:
Even if it's not full-blown iAMT (the idea of which may freak out private users), wake-on-LAN would be nicer if it could wake an "off" machine and not only a sleeper. Things can always be brought up to date at the next boot, but at least a better possibility to make things happen overnight would rule.

Would be an immensive energy saver for a big company/institution. Anyway, inexpensive marketing is always welcome, isn't it? :D

Apple getting a foothold in large cooperations would be a great thing.

Go for it!
 

Demoman

macrumors regular
Mar 29, 2005
194
0
Issaquah, WA
Not sure I like the idea of a powered-off machine being able to be accessed remotely. Or, at least, I see some potential security issues which may outweigh the benefit derived.
 

hob

macrumors 68010
Oct 4, 2003
2,004
0
London, UK
Demoman said:
Not sure I like the idea of a powered-off machine being able to be accessed remotely. Or, at least, I see some potential security issues which may outweigh the benefit derived.
I agree. It'll be a strange world when not even turning a computer off will make it secure against attack!!
 

macfan70

macrumors newbie
Sep 4, 2006
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0
What about using this technology in new devices that just use the processing power to get things done which power down when not in use and start up when a job is ready to start. Maybe something like the a new media center that start downloading or streaming movies, then power saves off when done.
 

Eidorian

macrumors Penryn
Mar 23, 2005
29,080
287
Indianapolis
Interesting development for us IT workers. I hope to see more from Apple in the business/education sector using this integration.
 

crees!

macrumors 68000
Jun 14, 2003
1,922
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MD/VA/DC
Having trouble following this. Shouldn't it be:

vPro is essentially a marketing initiative that is targeted toward business customers who incorporate Dual Core, 64-bit chips, and virtualization as well as the Active Management Technology (iAMT).
?
 

HecubusPro

macrumors 6502a
Aug 22, 2006
638
2
Los Angeles
Not really familiar with this, but I had comment/question concerning what this may mean in relation to the page 2 story yesterday concerning apple not fitting MBP's and MB's with core 2 duo's until next year. While I don't believe that article from The Inquirer about the lack of C2D's for apple, doesn't this seem to solidify that Intel is going to support Apple as much as possible, going to the point of mentioning 64-bit chips in apple's computers?

This report inadvertantly seems to contradict the claims made in The Inquirer about C2D not making it into MBP's and/or MB's. Am I way off target with this postulate?
 

hayesk

macrumors 65816
May 20, 2003
1,425
50
iMeowbot said:
Even if it's not full-blown iAMT (the idea of which may freak out private users), wake-on-LAN would be nicer if it could wake an "off" machine and not only a sleeper.
Aside from security concerns, for that to work you'd need a separate controller that could power the machine on given a specific instruction. It's really not worth it given that sleep does not consume that much power.
 

iMeowbot

macrumors G3
Aug 30, 2003
8,636
0
hayesk said:
Aside from security concerns, for that to work you'd need a separate controller that could power the machine on given a specific instruction.
Many, many Ethernet chips already support this. The feature is already common in the PC world, just not on Macs.

The security implications for a machine using that are really no different from the existing, limited, wake-on-LAN in Macs.

It's really not worth it given that sleep does not consume that much power.
It's worth it because users don't remember to pick sleep instead of shutdown.
 

rosalindavenue

macrumors 6502a
Dec 13, 2003
837
213
Virginia, USA
While I think Apple may use some or all of the technology, I don't see Apple participating in intel marketing, like "Centrino" or "vPro." Apple is way too image conscious to use terms also used by Dell, et. al.
 

iMeowbot

macrumors G3
Aug 30, 2003
8,636
0
hdsalinas said:
I dont have the slightest idea what vPro is, but I will want it on my imac... or dont I:p
For most home users, it would be utterly useless. This kind of feature is really aimed at offices, and maybe the hopeless fringe of home users with more computers than chairs in their houses.
 

Rocketman

macrumors 603
Demoman said:
Not sure I like the idea of a powered-off machine being able to be accessed remotely. Or, at least, I see some potential security issues which may outweigh the benefit derived.
It also would make it far easier for police to effectuate a search, even if secret or surprise.

They no longer need to SERVE you with a warrant to search. I disagree with that. They just do it and you never know unless you happen to be there or have technology to detect it. In some cases they are not even required to notify you at all the search was conducted!

I would like to see security assurances for the buyer that an owner of a GPS enabled cellphone is currently lacking.

Rocketman
 

Bonte

macrumors 6502a
Jul 1, 2002
934
142
Bruges, Belgium
iMeowbot said:
hayesk said:
Aside from security concerns, for that to work you'd need a separate controller that could power the machine on given a specific instruction.
Many, many Ethernet chips already support this. The feature is already common in the PC world, just not on Macs.
In pre-iMac times with os8 there was a share- or freeware app that did just that, we lost this feature with the iMac and b/w models.
 

Naimfan

Suspended
Jan 15, 2003
4,669
1,997
I agree with Rocketman. I don't see the point for the overwhelming majority of home users, and the technology appears to me, from what I've gleaned about it, to be a step towards (the perhaps overused cliche) Big Brother. Part of the reason I have a Mac is precisely because it does not have, as far as I know, anything like the technology referenced.

Also, the technology is one more step down the infamous slippery slope--one more step to reduced privacy and the possibility of greater governmental intrusion into our lives. It makes individual rights, the cornerstone of the US legal system and society, less sacrosanct. Granted, this is not the only technology to do that--far from it--but it is depressing to read that Apple may consider using it. One of the things that I have always appreciated and respected about Apple is that as a corporation it really does seem to value the individual, whether as a consumer, employee, etc.

Best,

Bob
 

kingtj

macrumors 68030
Oct 23, 2003
2,545
679
Brunswick, MD
Not a valid concern, really....

It's good to consider these types of scenarios, but it's a misplaced worry in this instance. The ability to remotely power on a PC is only available for a system that's still plugged into the wall outlet. If you had concerns, you could simply power off your machine via the switch on a power strip, effectively unplugging it.

But even if you didn't - I fail to see why police would be able to do things any differently than they do today, from a legal perspective? They still need to obtain a warrant to search the contents of your *personal* computer. If they chose not to get one and just remotely powered on your machine and started looking around at it, any information they obtained wouldn't be admissable as evidence in a court of law.

It's not much different than a cop looking for evidence in the trunk of your car by picking the lock open while you have it parked in front of the grocery store. They could *do* that, but it doesn't make it legal or usable evidence.


Rocketman said:
It also would make it far easier for police to effectuate a search, even if secret or surprise.

They no longer need to SERVE you with a warrant to search. I disagree with that. They just do it and you never know unless you happen to be there or have technology to detect it. In some cases they are not even required to notify you at all the search was conducted!

I would like to see security assurances for the buyer that an owner of a GPS enabled cellphone is currently lacking.

Rocketman
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,610
408
Redondo Beach, California
Sun Microsystems calls this feature "Lights Out Management", It is not quite the same thing but the same idea. Basically there is a very small computer on the main-board, maybe some little 4-bit thing that takes almost no power to run but a sys-admin can log into this little computer even when the main CPU(s) and disk drives are powered down or broken. He can run diagnostics on the machine and even re-load an operating system. and the best part is that he can do it all remotely. It looks like Intel has put this small process inside the ship set where it has access to the Ethernet controller. Smart move.

When I first got into computers almost ALL computrs had a small "ROM monitor" a very simple software that ran even if there was no disk or RAM on the computer. One command they all had was "boot" and you used that to boot the OS. The IBM PC was one of the first computers to skip this feature. I'd like to see it back. Makes hardware debugging very easy.
 

crees!

macrumors 68000
Jun 14, 2003
1,922
26
MD/VA/DC
Kingsly said:
Ditto. Sorry MacRumors, but I think you need a full time story editor.
Hey now! Don't go volunteering me :D
This subject went over my head as I haven't heard of this, but having to figure out and correct the grammer just to understand what the post is about.. THEN to figure out what the heck this thing is is a bit much.

Yea, I know. whaaaaa. :p
 

MrCrowbar

macrumors 68000
Jan 12, 2006
1,955
70
You people power off your Macs???
My Macbook does it on it's own a lot... search youtube for "macbook shutdown".