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Intel today unveiled its full lineup of "Purley" Xeon processors, most of which have already launched or are launching soon, but none of the chips in the lineup appear to be appropriate for Apple's upcoming iMac Pro at the high end.

When the iMac Pro was announced, Apple said it would use Intel's Xeon processors, with 8, 10, and 18 core chips available as optional configurations with up to 42MB cache and maximum Turbo Boost up to 4.5GHz.

imac_pro_white_background-800x585.jpg

Despite rumors suggesting Apple will use Purley processors in the machines, the currently available chips do not match those specifications. The chips max out at 4.2GHz Turbo Boost, so at least some of the processors Apple plans to use are not yet available from Intel.

With none of the chips lining up with Apple's promised high-end specifications, the most likely explanation is that Intel has additional Purley chips on the horizon that have yet to be announced. Next-generation Xeon chips, codenamed Cascade Lake, won't be available until 2018, and thus won't be ready in time for Apple's promised December release date.

In late June, Pike's Universum dug up firmware files from the macOS High Sierra beta suggesting the iMac Pro will use Intel's server-class LGA3647 socket rather than the desktop-class LGA2066 socket, pointing towards the use of server-grade "Purley" Skylake-SP processors.

Those same firmware files suggest the new iMac Pro will feature a Secure Enclave with an ARM coprocessor like the MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, but it's unclear what that functionality will be used for. Touch ID is, however, a possibility.

Apple's iMac Pro is expected to be available for purchase this December, with pricing starting at $4,999 in the United States. Along with server-grade processors, the machines are expected to feature Radeon Pro Vega graphics, up to 128GB of ECC RAM, and up to 4TB of SSD storage.

Article Link: Intel Unveils 'Purley' Xeon Chip Lineup, but None are Appropriate for High-End iMac Pro
 

jdaven

macrumors newbie
Jul 11, 2017
1
11
The 42 MB refers to L2+L3 cache. The Gold Xeon 6154 has 18 cores which is 18 MB L2 and 24.75 MB L3. This adds up to 42.75 MB. I'm sure Apple marketing doesn't need to be so accurate. The 4.5 GHz turbo refers to Intel's new turbo feature that will raise a single core without defects to 4.5 GHz. So far this is only advertised on X299 platform chips but since the feature doesn't require new silicon, I'm sure Intel could enable the new turbo mode on Xeon chips for select customers like Apple. The iMac will only be using a single socket and all new Purley platform Xeons support 2 or more. A special single socket version for the iMac might allow the new turbo mode.
 
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Avieshek

Suspended
Dec 7, 2013
701
1,128
India
Why HBM is downplayed everytime here?
Does MacRumors know what it even is, other than an abbreviation?
 
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Joe The Dragon

macrumors 6502a
Jul 26, 2006
752
184
The 42 MB refers to L2+L3 cache. The Gold Xeon 6154 has 18 cores which is 18 MB L2 and 24.75 MB L3. This adds up to 42.75 MB. I'm sure Apple marketing doesn't need to be so accurate. The 4.5 GHz turbo refers to Intel's new turbo feature that will raise a single core without defects to 4.5 GHz. So far this is only advertised on X299 platform chips but since the feature doesn't require new silicon, I'm sure Intel could enable the new turbo mode on Xeon chips for select customers like Apple. The iMac will only be using a single socket and all new Purley platform Xeons support 2 or more. A special single socket version for the iMac might allow the new turbo mode.
now if Intel shakes stuff up / kills a few SKU's / does price cut's to keep up with AMD will this system price and cpu upgrade pricing be on pair with other pro workstations? and will the CPU upgrades be overpriced by $800-1000's+?
 
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pankajdoharey

macrumors 6502
Feb 19, 2014
426
300
Oz town, Jade City. Mars
Apple should start designing its own silicon for desktops now they have already done it successfuly for years on iphone and tablet. Doing their own silicon will be cheaper and can be made more powerfull than the nonsense x86 architecture of intel. ARM is a risc processor, i think apple should lead the way for ARM on Desktops. Nobody else can do that, only Apple can.
 
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Quu

macrumors 68040
Apr 2, 2007
3,060
5,294
Apple has received custom XEON's from Intel previously. The high end Mac Pro (non-Trashcan) came with delidded XEON's that Intel did not sell in retail etc

So it's completely conceivable that Apple has got themselves some higher binned parts for the iMac Pro.
 
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DHagan4755

macrumors 65816
Jul 18, 2002
1,161
1,407
Massachusetts
Those same firmware files suggest the new iMac Pro will feature a Secure Enclave with an ARM coprocessor like the MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, but it's unclear what that functionality will be used for. Touch ID is, however, a possibility.
It's going to use the 3D facial recognition the next iPhone is going to use.
 
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danielwsmithee

macrumors 65816
Mar 12, 2005
1,121
402
Who says Apple designed this iMacPro in a few months, where's your proof.
No kidding there had been rumors of an upcoming Pro iMac for what ~2 years now. My guess is the iMac Pro was already well on its way to completion by the time of their Pro press conference. The big technical challenges (new thermal system, add Power Supply draw etc) all appear to have been solved by WWDC. Apple is just waiting on the intel parts are perfecting the firmware at this point.
 
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lazyrighteye

macrumors 68020
Jan 16, 2002
2,115
946
Denver, CO
... Next-generation Xeon chips, codenamed Cascade Lake, won't be available until 2018, and thus won't be ready in time for Apple's promised December release date...​

Was that a "cross my heart and hope to die" promise and was it December release to order dates or release to deliver dates?

It would not be the least bit shocking if preorders began in December with deliveries set for March. Leaving 2-3 months for the vocal anti-Tim and Apple is doomed! parties to pummel their poor keyboards. :D
 
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mmomega

macrumors demi-god
Dec 30, 2009
3,785
1,958
DFW, TX
I find so hard to understand why an iMac Pro -where almost every part is custom- can be designed in a few months, while the promised "modular Mac Pro" needs more than a year.
That design has been around since 2012.
Some may even say 2009 with the slightly thicker model.
Which was only slightly different than the 2007.

Over the course of a decade we have seen 2 different looking Mac Pros. 7 years from the time we saw the cheese grater to the trash can.
Historically if we see a new Mac Pro design before 2020 we'll be doing good.
 
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aaronhead14

macrumors 65816
Mar 9, 2009
1,136
5,080
I still don't get why Apple took the time to design this when they could have used those resources towards designing and releasing the modular Mac Pro sooner. I personally don't know a single pro user in my field who wants this iMac Pro. It simply doesn't have the customizability and expandability that we need.
 
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bice

macrumors member
Aug 22, 2015
88
173
So was the iMac Pro a distraction from the lack of a new MP as some have speculated? :apple:
imac pro was probably very late in the development stages when apple realised that the pro wants a modular pro machine, which apple hadn't done any development for. They didn't want to waste the investment in the imac pro, so they are going forward with it, but at the same time they have told the pros that a real modular pro machine is coming.
 
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