iOS 10.3.2 is running blazing fast on my iPhone 6S, do you think iOS 11 will slow it down?


ajthom90

macrumors newbie
Jun 16, 2016
11
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Minnesota
I am running the beta on my iPhone SE currently, which is pretty much the same specs as the 6S. I notice a small amount of lag with regard to opening apps, etc, but once I'm in the apps, most everything seems to be running great. A few glitches here and there in apps that will be fixed by developers by the time of the final public release in September. The main problem right now is battery life. I pulled my phone off the charger this morning when I woke up. I've barely used it at all so far today, and it's been in my pocket most of the day. The battery is at 14%. But, as is the case with betas, the battery life is usually horrendous for the first couple betas and improves as it gets closer to the wide release.

I'd guess that your 6S will run iOS 11 just fine!
 

keysofanxiety

macrumors G3
Nov 23, 2011
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Well the beta is currently in DP1 so any iOS 11 performance hiccups are likely bug related.

However your 6S is still insanely powerful; nearly 50% more powerful per-core over the Google Pixel XL and boasts an even better multicore score even with half the cores! Apple have done a great job with iOS iterations recently as well – they're really optimised for older devices. Even iOS 10 runs beautifully on my aged 5S.

Though it's too soon to say with any certainty, I'd bet my bottom dollar that the final release of iOS 11 will run buttery smooth on your 6S.
 

Sunny1990

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Feb 13, 2015
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I have downloaded iOS 11 beta on my two iPhones [iPhone 7 Plus & iPhone 6S Plus] and they are running both fine. There are lag and hiccups sometimes but that's bearable.

There are so may useful features in iOS 11 which makes it well worth the upgrade, i think you should wait until the public beta version which will be out later this month, atleast that will be more stable and bugs and lags fixed out.
 

Beenblacklisted

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Dec 28, 2011
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Well the beta is currently in DP1 so any iOS 11 performance hiccups are likely bug related.

However your 6S is still insanely powerful; nearly 50% more powerful per-core over the Google Pixel XL and boasts an even better multicore score even with half the cores! Apple have done a great job with iOS iterations recently as well – they're really optimised for older devices. Even iOS 10 runs beautifully on my aged 5S.

Though it's too soon to say with any certainty, I'd bet my bottom dollar that the final release of iOS 11 will run buttery smooth on your 6S.
I beg to differ i have ios 10 on my iphone 6 , and it has crippled my phone. Secondly your math seems off...your saying a dual core phone boasts more power than a quad core phone?. I think the fanboy might have been in the sun too long...
 
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bufffilm

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May 3, 2011
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Any 2gb RAM iPhone will be fine w/ios11.

The 6/+ and earlier...that's up to you. With each later iOS release... you know the drill.
 
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keysofanxiety

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Nov 23, 2011
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Secondly your math seems off...your saying a dual core phone boasts more power than a quad core phone?. I think the fanboy might have been in the sun too long...
Umm, that's really not how hardware works. If for example you have a 16-core processor with each core boasting the power of a '93 Pentium, then a dual-core mobile i3 would outperform it. 16 cores wouldn't mean jack if the total performance can't even hit that of a single i3 thread.

Similarly, and actually in this instance, a dual-core CPU with more than double per-core performance will have a higher multicore score than a quad-core. Therefore it will actually perform better in multicore tasks.Then let's add in the software optimisation. Not all software or OSs can efficiently use more cores, especially mobile OSs.

But if you still think my maths is off, feel free to check the numbers for yourself and subtract one from the other. I'll leave multiplication for another day as that's obviously a bit of a hurdle. If anybody's been in the sun too long, it's the knee-jerk reactionist who automatically thinks more means better and doesn't entertain the crazy idea of knowing what they're talking about.
 

Beenblacklisted

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Dec 28, 2011
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Umm, that's really not how hardware works. If for example you have a 16-core processor with each core boasting the power of a '93 Pentium, then a dual-core mobile i3 would outperform it. 16 cores wouldn't mean jack if the total performance can't even hit that of a single i3 thread.

Similarly, and actually in this instance, a dual-core CPU with more than double per-core performance will have a higher multicore score than a quad-core. Therefore it will actually perform better in multicore tasks.Then let's add in the software optimisation. Not all software or OSs can efficiently use more cores, especially mobile OSs.

But if you still think my maths is off, feel free to check the numbers for yourself and subtract one from the other. I'll leave multiplication for another day as that's obviously a bit of a hurdle. If anybody's been in the sun too long, it's the knee-jerk reactionist who automatically thinks more means better and doesn't entertain the crazy idea of knowing what they're talking about.
These are the numbers:
Your numbers are off...
Apple A9- Dual Core Max 1.8ghz
Google Pixel xl- SnapdragonMS 8996 quadcore (2 faster cores 2.2ghz-2.4ghz max clock rate) (2 Slower cores 1.6ghz-2.0ghz)
 
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keysofanxiety

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Nov 23, 2011
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These are the numbers:
Your numbers are off...
Apple A9- Dual Core Max 1.8ghz
Google Pixel xl- SnapdragonMS 8996 quadcore (2 faster cores 2.2ghz-2.4ghz max clock rate) (2 Slower cores 1.6ghz-2.0ghz)
Oh sweet, so clock speed is the decider when it comes to performance! Well I'm glad you took the time to educate us all on this matter.

I'll recommend users ditch their 1.6GHz MacBook Air and go back to a 3.4GHz Pentium 4 instead. Thanks for the advice!
 

Beenblacklisted

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Dec 28, 2011
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Oh sweet, so clock speed is the decider when it comes to performance! Well I'm glad you took the time to educate us all on this matter.

I'll recommend users ditch their 1.6GHz MacBook Air and go back to a 3.4GHz Pentium 4 instead. Thanks for the advice!
i am merely stating two competing products that were released at the same time. the two products you are referring two were released years apart. my reference was specific to two items released 6 months apart operating items in the same class of electronics. yours was a exaggerated generalization powered by emotion.
 
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keysofanxiety

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Nov 23, 2011
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i am merely stating two competing products that were released at the same time. the two products you are referring two were released years apart. my reference was specific to two items released 6 months apart operating items in the same class of electronics. yours was a exaggerated generalization powered by emotion.
Okay. I reviewed the numbers. It wasn't a 50% per-core performance increase as I originally remembered, just around 30% per core. Multicore score is practically identical with half the cores and half the RAM, which still says it all. No performance benefit. There are a number of higher Pixel XL multicore benchmarks with all eight cores in use but obviously those were a little skewed (should use only four at a time rather than the four low power ones in tandem with the four high performance ones). Much like the iPhone wouldn't use the two low power cores at the same time as the high performance ones.

Regardless, the point is that Apple's CPUs utterly slay the competition and continue to do so. The iPhone 7 is even better, the new iPad considerably better than that, and the next iPhone likely to be even better than the current iPad if history's anything to go by.

https://browser.primatelabs.com/v4/cpu/2236670

https://browser.primatelabs.com/v4/cpu/3132169

Per-core performance and memory bandwidth is the kicker for real-world performance. Android and a lot of iOS software to a point can't make the most of four cores.

So two cores with the same multicore score as a quad core would perform faster; more cores means less efficiency with software optimisation. Similarly 8 cores with an identical multicore score and less per-core performance would be even less efficient than that. You even see it with GPUs in SLI/Crossfire. You don't get double the performance but closer to 30/40%.

And of course this is in a mobile device. Throwing more cores and more RAM for better performance is very lazy and ultimately self-defeating. It doesn't address the inherent issues with software optimisation and RAM efficiency on Android.

Hope this clarifies what I meant. :)
 

rui no onna

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Oct 25, 2013
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i am merely stating two competing products that were released at the same time. the two products you are referring two were released years apart. my reference was specific to two items released 6 months apart operating items in the same class of electronics. yours was a exaggerated generalization powered by emotion.
Intel vs AMD (at least starting with Conroe/Wolfdale). Intel had less cores but better IPC. AMD had more cores. Real-world use, Intel was generally better while AMD did well on video encoding and similar tasks.
 

Reno Raines

macrumors 65816
Jul 19, 2015
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I always figure any iOS upgrade is potentially going to slow one's phone down. I like to wait some and hear a general consensus from other more brave souls and see how their experiences were. It has been my experience that the first two upgrades an iphone gets are not bad but the third and beyond can start to cause lag and a general slow down of my phone.
 

Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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I have downloaded iOS 11 beta on my two iPhones [iPhone 7 Plus & iPhone 6S Plus] and they are running both fine. There are lag and hiccups sometimes but that's bearable.

There are so may useful features in iOS 11 which makes it well worth the upgrade, i think you should wait until the public beta version which will be out later this month, atleast that will be more stable and bugs and lags fixed out.
But here in this thread listed below, you stated you would refuse update to iOS 11 due to "Planned obsolescence" and now you're running the iOS 11 beta?

I think iOS 11 will beneficial Enough where it will bring the iPhone 8 Back with "Full energy."

https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/your-thoughts-on-ios-11-with-the-ipad.2049173/#post-24656089
 
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Vivian125

macrumors 6502
May 19, 2017
310
59
iOS 13 will certainly slow it ..... hahahaha
As If the iPhone 6S gets iOS 13, but i think it is not and will be left on iOS 12 since it is still DUAL CORE just like the iPhone 4S from 2011. Lacks HEVC encoding, bluetooth 5.0 Poor speaker and battery life, not water resistant.. As i've watched the rumours, it seems like both iPhone 7 and 8 or even the XS has missing some to few features as if the newer iPhone XI will get latest feature leaving iPhone 7/8/XS behind. how much more the 6S below will be left then.
by watching that it makes me feel sad.