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iOS 9.1 Web Activity Tapers Off After Surfacing in July

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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Even as we await the public launch of iOS 9 in September, Apple is already looking ahead to iOS 9.1. During a two week span in July, Apple engineers appear to have focused their attention on developing the first major update to iOS 9, as seen in the MacRumors visitor logs from Apple IPs.

Beginning on July 21, we started seeing a small number of hits from devices running iOS 9.1. Visits picked up on July 22 and peaked in the dozens on July 28, before dying down as August approached. The majority of hits we received came from an iPad or iPad mini-sized device, while the rest came from a device the same size as the iPhone 6 Plus. It is not clear if the visits came from existing iOS devices or from new devices that are in testing, including the iPhone 6s Plus and the iPad mini 3.

Visits to MacRumors.com via Apple's networks from devices running iOS 9.1

Visits from iOS 9.1 devices have since tapered off, suggesting Apple's iOS team is once again working on getting iOS 9 ready for launch. It is not known why a two week period was spent on iOS 9.1, but it's possibly related to testing on the iPad Pro or iPad mini 4, both of which may already be in production or entering production soon.

We don't know what features will be introduced in iOS 9.1, but logic dictates it may be an update that's designed to launch alongside the larger-screened 12.9-inch "iPad Pro," which has been rumored to be coming in October or November. We did not, however, see visits from a device that corresponds to the rumored 2732 x 2048 display size of the iPad Pro.

For the past several years, Apple's iPads have debuted during the fall, launching in October or November at an event separate from the annual iPhone event. This year, there's been a rumor suggesting the next-generation iPads, namely the iPad mini 4, could debut in September alongside the iPhones, but it is not yet clear if this is Apple's plan.

BuzzFeed's John Paczkowski, who shared the event date for the 2015 iPhone 6 launch, believes new iPads are a possibility, but called the iPad Pro a "wildcard" for the event. Given how little we've heard about the device in recent weeks and the lack of part leaks, it seems unlikely the iPad Pro is ready for a September debut.


A standalone October or November launch date for the device seems more likely, and that launch could correspond to the iOS 9.1 update that is in the works. The iPad Pro may include several new features that will require a dedicated update, such as a pressure sensitive Force Touch display, a stylus, and a USB-C port that could support peripheral devices.

Article Link: iOS 9.1 Web Activity Tapers Off After Surfacing in July
 

Tankmaze

macrumors 68000
Mar 7, 2012
1,685
306
If there is a standalone event for october / november to introduce the iPad pro, I'm sure Apple would also introduce the skylake macbook pro.
 

curiousphil

macrumors newbie
Apr 15, 2014
7
1
I really hope this iPad Pro actually caters to the pro creative market. I'm talking a tablet that can synchronize with a capable computer and provide Cintiq level production... Does bigger alone really equal "pro"? If so, why didn't they call the iPhone 6 Plus the iPhone 6 Pro?
 
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MentalFloss

macrumors 65816
Mar 14, 2012
1,017
838
It's entirely possible that they started working on the 9.1 version with some kind of major feature that they did not expect to be ready in time for the release of iOS 9. Then possibly the version was merged into iOS 9 after all, or the feature was dropped, and iOS 9.1 with it.
 

MacsRgr8

macrumors 604
Sep 8, 2002
7,863
1,184
The Netherlands
why would they continue to visit mac related sites when they know they can be tracked?
or they just don't care?
I think they don't care.
It's not uncommon for Apple to be moving forward on a new OS (iOS and/or OS X) before the next beta is there for the developers, and we all know it.

I'm sure sometime this winter we will read of OS X 10.12 uses of MacRumors....
 
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bbeagle

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2010
3,419
2,684
Buffalo, NY
Wow...already?

Most people don't understand software development.

You have people working on all different versions at the same time.

15 developers working on 9.0 (code that will be done by September)
5 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
....

Then when 9.0 is released, 12 developers go on to 9.1 work.... while 3 stay back to fix bugs with 9.0

So you have this in October....
3 developers working on 9.0 (bug fixes)
15 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
2 developers working on 10.1 (code that will take 15 months to develop)
....

it's just the way that software is developed. (These are just made up examples to show in lay-man terms what happens)
 

nepalisherpa

macrumors 68020
Aug 15, 2011
2,152
1,078
USA
Most people don't understand software development.

You have people working on all different versions at the same time.

15 developers working on 9.0 (code that will be done by September)
5 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
....

Then when 9.0 is released, 12 developers go on to 9.1 work.... while 3 stay back to fix bugs with 9.0

So you have this in October....
3 developers working on 9.0 (bug fixes)
15 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
2 developers working on 10.1 (code that will take 15 months to develop)
....

it's just the way that software is developed. (These are just made up examples to show in lay-man terms what happens)

I should have added a "sarcasm" tag to my post. ;) I'm a software developer as well and I know this.
 

MikhailT

macrumors 601
Nov 12, 2007
4,490
1,125
why would they continue to visit mac related sites when they know they can be tracked?
or they just don't care?

They really don't care as it gives them free marketing, now more people have thought of Apple of today when they read this.

It's entirely possible that they started working on the 9.1 version with some kind of major feature that they did not expect to be ready in time for the release of iOS 9. Then possibly the version was merged into iOS 9 after all, or the feature was dropped, and iOS 9.1 with it.

Pretty much this. They're working on several branches of iOS and OS X at the same time and only merging the branch when it is ready. It is likely the feature branch they were working on for iOS 9.1 is related to the network stack and they needed to test it. It works, they moved on to the next one, thus it tapered off.
 
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MentalFloss

macrumors 65816
Mar 14, 2012
1,017
838
I really hope this iPad Pro actually caters to the pro creative market. I'm talking a tablet that can synchronize with a capable computer and provide Cintiq level production... Does bigger alone really equal "pro"? If so, why didn't they call the iPhone 6 Plus the iPhone 6 Pro?
The "pro" refers to the fact that you can do more productive work on the tablet itself. It will not be marketed as a slave device. If you want a high quality digitizer tablet for doing artwork, just get a Cintiq. I strongly doubt Apple will ever go down that road. That is a niche market, and the prices of the Cintiq tablets are quite far above what I would expect for a bigger iPad.

And the iPhone 6 Plus was not called "pro", because it is bigger than the iPhone 6, but not bigger than the iPad. Nobody really expects you to do larger amount of word processing on the iPhone 6 Plus.

As a sidenote: So far, Apple hasn't called any iOS device "Pro".
 
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tampageek

macrumors 6502
Jul 1, 2015
343
537
Florida, USA
Why do I feel like  is getting way too much like another company we know (MS...cough) with constant updates because they can't get it right the first time.

I never use to worry about a MAC updates. Now I feel like I have to let the guinea pigs play with it first to find out if it breaks more things than it fixes.
 

seamer

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2009
426
164
why would they continue to visit mac related sites when they know they can be tracked?
or they just don't care?

Testing on sites you don't own or didn't build makes it easier to see what's working (and what isn't). The devs are probably using the OS as their daily driver for the duration of their tests.
 
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vertsix

macrumors 65816
Aug 12, 2015
1,249
1,970
The betas of iOS 9 on the iPhone 5s have been atrociously bad. I already had to downgrade twice (once in beta 2 and once in beta 5).

Apple still has yet to catch up to iOS 8.4.1 in terms of performance for the 5s, and THEN deliver on the performance and battery life improvements that iOS 9 offers. I don't see that happening when iOS 9.0 goes live.

I'll just stick around with the super stable and smooth iOS 8.4.1 on my 5s for a few weeks after 9.0 launches, and hold off until iOS 9.0.1 or 9.1. And I'm glad it's in development.
 

szw-mapple fan

macrumors 68000
Jul 28, 2012
1,979
1,769
How to not increase secrecy: visit a site dedicated to rumors about your products on a product running unreleased software.
Apple devices are specifically made so that users can access macrumors. That's their number one probity when developing new versions of the OS. I thought that was common knowledge.:p
 

sofila

macrumors 65816
Jan 19, 2006
1,091
1,202
Ramtop Mountains
Most people don't understand software development.

You have people working on all different versions at the same time.

15 developers working on 9.0 (code that will be done by September)
5 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
....

Then when 9.0 is released, 12 developers go on to 9.1 work.... while 3 stay back to fix bugs with 9.0

So you have this in October....
3 developers working on 9.0 (bug fixes)
15 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
2 developers working on 10.1 (code that will take 15 months to develop)
....

it's just the way that software is developed. (These are just made up examples to show in lay-man terms what happens)
So developers fixing bugs will always be in minority. No chance they can win at the end.
PS Just a joke
 

bondsbw

macrumors member
Sep 7, 2006
85
37
iOS is OS X optimized for touchscreen :)

(Yeah, I know, you want to run your Mac apps on it. But really, it's not a good idea.)

It's not inherently a bad idea; it's just that Apple has never provided a device for both touch and mouse/keyboard use, so apps target one or the other.

Something like the universal apps in Windows 10 (which support a host of input mechanisms) is where I think they would have to focus to be truly useful as both a tablet and a professional computing device.
 

sbailey4

macrumors 68040
Dec 5, 2011
3,834
1,992
USA
Most people don't understand software development.

You have people working on all different versions at the same time.

15 developers working on 9.0 (code that will be done by September)
5 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
....

Then when 9.0 is released, 12 developers go on to 9.1 work.... while 3 stay back to fix bugs with 9.0

So you have this in October....
3 developers working on 9.0 (bug fixes)
15 developers working on 9.1 (code that might take 2-3 months to develop)
5 developers working on 9.2 (code that might take 5-6 months to develop)
2 developers working on 10.0 (code that will take 1 year to develop)
2 developers working on 10.1 (code that will take 15 months to develop)
....

it's just the way that software is developed. (These are just made up examples to show in lay-man terms what happens)
So how many are working on iOS 9.0.1 or better yet 9.0.2 that will come out to fix the cellular connectivity that 9.0.1 breaks? And who's on first? :confused:
 
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