iOS and Android - Really all the different? A similarity in pictures

Discussion in 'Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices' started by Lloydbm41, Nov 22, 2014.

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  1. Lloydbm41 macrumors 68040

    Lloydbm41

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    #1
    There are reasons to like iOS over Android and vice versa, but that boils down to personal preference and economics of one ecosystem over the other.

    When you cut out all the external factors and leave just the OS, the difference between the two is literally so minimal, I'd argue there is almost no difference. Sure, I can have a back button with one system, tap to the top of the screen with another, slightly different system setting menus, but if I handed someone a Nexus and an iOS, 99% could easily navigate both systems with success.

    I happen to own both systems and use both daily. Other than finding myself tapping a non-existant home button on the Nexus 5 ocassionally, they both function nearly identically.

    Take a look at how I have my Nexus 5 on Android 5.0 and iPhone 6 on iOS 8.1.1 set up. Nearly identical.

    If you'd like to add some pics to show similarities between apps on both OS's, please feel free.
     

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  2. mi7chy macrumors 68040

    mi7chy

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    #2
    That's kind of a superficial and one dimensional view. I can post screenshots making Windows 3.11 look like Windows 8.1 but no way are they similar.
     
  3. Lloydbm41 thread starter macrumors 68040

    Lloydbm41

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    #3
    not superficial, but yes this is a one dimensional view. That doesn't negate the fact that both OS's operate nearly identically and have a similar GUI. Don't add personal bias into this.
     
  4. slu macrumors 68000

    slu

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    #4
    I agree with this. When I moved to Android, most people I know used iPhone. They asked what it was like, and my stock response is that it is 90% the same as iOS. My wife moved to android and it really felt no different to her.
     
  5. mib1800 macrumors 68000

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    #5
    At basic or normal type use, I think vast majority of android users would not have any issues navigating the UI even if you don't make it like iphone.
     
  6. JamesMike macrumors demi-god

    JamesMike

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    #6
    I have a Samsung Galaxy S5, frequently I help my iPhone friends with their phones and have no trouble navigating through them.
     
  7. Tig Bitties macrumors 68030

    Tig Bitties

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    #7
    People need to wake up. iPhone and Android do the same things almost exactly the same. Really very little difference.

    - Do both phones text the same ? Yep pretty much
    - Do both phones make phone calls ? Yes.
    - Do both phones surf the web ? Yes.
    - Do both phones do e-mail ? Yes.
    - Do both phones have apps to track sports ? Yep

    Both are like little pocket computers. Just with different, styles and OS designs, but overall very similar to each other. Just that Android offers more customization and uniqueness.
     
  8. apolloa macrumors G3

    apolloa

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    #8
    Not entirely sure of the point of this thread??? I mean grid view, yeah been around for years, icons at the top to indicate battery levels and signal strength, again been around for years LOOOOOOOONNNGGGGG before Android or iOS, touchscreens, well needless to say, been around for years.

    They do not operate the same though, because they have their own different ways to get to things like settings and then the layouts are totally different, but they both have buttons and switches.

    This thread is a bit like posting a picture of two cars and saying they are identical as they both have wheels etc, well of course they do and they were in no way shape or form the first to offer them either.
     
  9. Savor Suspended

    Savor

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    #9
    For me, if someone copies someone, they have to find ways to IMPROVE something. Not just trace over a piece of artwork and call it a day. It is easy to call it a CLONE when both platforms are on opposite ends of philosophy (open vs close).

    Google copied Apple early on when Android was more of a BlackBerry OS clone. It wasn't until everyone saw iPhone back in 2007 that they had to scrap the look and rewrite the script. But in return, iOS7 or iOS8 would never be intuitive either without copying ideas of Android and such. The most often overlooked features Android can do become headline features for iOS8 like the ability to choose your keyboard and app communication.

    If Apple was stuck suing everyone by protecting patents which I understand if they do it, innovation would never evolve. Because Apple is TOO BUSY criticizing others by wearing the same clothes when ideas get built upon over each other. Ideas evolve and improve. Michael Jordan paved the way for Kobe Bryant and so many younger players. But MJ was also inspired by David Thompson and Julius Erving. Were The Beatles all the revolutionary when they took the sound of the early bluesman from the 1800's and rockabilly from the 1950's? Most modern music come from slave music. The guitar which are regularly used by whites in bands was an African instrument. Human nature is mimetic.

    The Woz is right that technology is like music. It evolves. It copies. Some cover bands do it better than originals (sometimes). Hot one minute. Cold the next. That's evolution. Copying is part of that process since ideas always get built upon from prev ideas. Heck, even the inventor of the telephone isn't just credited to one guy. It isn't solely on Abraham Graham Bell who many of us were taught in history class. What about Elisha Gray and Antonio Meucci? Hugo Barra of Xiaomi kind of makes a point that if two brilliant artists exist, they both may end up coming to the same conclusion.

    I can easily say Android is a clone of iOS. But since Android has many areas where it is superior to iOS and not just looks but ACTS, I can easily forgive Android if both look the same.
     
  10. Gaugerer, Nov 22, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2014

    Gaugerer macrumors member

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    #10
    The big difference between Android and IOS is that Android can be enhanced to provide greater functionality such as the S-Pen, split-screen multitasking, removable storage found on the Note 4 which produces more productivity.
     
  11. Lloydbm41 thread starter macrumors 68040

    Lloydbm41

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    #11
    That can all be done on ios devices as well, Apple just chooses not to write the code (or enable the code.)

    As for removable storage, both iOS and Android allow this whether you are talking SD card, OTG cable or MFi storage is semantics.
     
  12. mib1800 macrumors 68000

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    #12
    That is just the same as not available. No point talking about if this and if that.

    We can all see apple was wrong on a lot of things. Otherwise apple would not have now continously copy android throughout the years like multi task, notification, widget,keyboard etc.

    I won't be surprised next year apple will lift something off android. Apple is now just a copier with no innovation whatever. It is just waiting around to copy the next idea.
     
  13. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #13
    As far as visually and productively, I wouldn't be able to get my homescreen like this on iOS. And my homescreens are pretty simple. You'll see the real differences between iOS and Android on the "post your homescreens" threads. Customization is king.
     

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  14. Gaugerer macrumors member

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    #14
    Does IOS allow apps to be moved to removable storage and executed from there for that is possible on Android and is very useful when device storage is getting low?
     
  15. mi7chy macrumors 68040

    mi7chy

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    #15
    Icon based home screen has been around for over two decades. Even back then something as simple as placing your icon anywhere on the screen can't be done on iOS in 2014. Furthermore, there's no system wide pen input API, no split screen multitasking, app switching vs true multitasking, no mouse support and the list goes on and on. There's also things you don't see like uptime counter which isn't in iOS and stability. You can't fool anyone who has used both extensively.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Europa13 macrumors 6502

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    #16
    We had multitasking and notifications on iOS before the first Android smartphones were available. The early iOS jailbreak developers were the first to implement them on a mobile platform. It's quite the stretch to say Apple stole them from Android. Widgets existed on computers long before Android added them. It's kind of a no-brainer to expect any of these things to make their way to handheld computers.
     
  17. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #17
    Wrong, Multitasking on smartphones was alive and well before the iPhone.
     
  18. Europa13 macrumors 6502

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    #18
    Sorry, I meant a mobile touchscreen platform. I guess the Blackberrys and Palms had it first as far as mobile devices, huh?
     
  19. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #19
    Still wrong .... :p
     
  20. mi7chy macrumors 68040

    mi7chy

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    #20
    Nokia Symbian had true preemptive multitasking back in like 2001 and first touchscreen in 2004.
     
  21. Lloydbm41 thread starter macrumors 68040

    Lloydbm41

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    #21
    You are confusing a Touchwiz workaround with Android. Samsung is not Android.

    Now Windows phone actually does allow for use of SD cards at the OS level. Android currently does not.

    ----------

    It amazes me that there are still people that think skinned Touchwiz is the same as Android. Where in my original post did I mention Samsung or Touchwiz? Split screen and pen input for a Wacom digitizer is not built into Android.

    And 'uptime'? Really? You consider this something significant?
     
  22. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

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    #22
    Lollipop does.
     
  23. Lloydbm41 thread starter macrumors 68040

    Lloydbm41

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    #23
    Don't believe it is fully implemented yet, hence why I said 'currently'.
     
  24. Savor, Nov 22, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2014

    Savor Suspended

    Savor

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    #24
    Palm's webOS & RIM's QNX (circa 2011)

    If anyone remembered three years ago, the BlackBerry PlayBook's QNX UI borrowed alot of ideas from webOS. QNX had been around years before Research In Motion bought them. While webOS had so-called cards, QNX used a similar UI pattern. But one thing I liked with QNX was adding an extra element to it. When videos were streaming or playing, it could still be played in the background while you switched between apps on the homescreen.

    QNX took real-time multi-tasking ideas from webOS which was already a great idea to begin with and improved it in some way. Add The Astonishing Tribe (TAT) which specializes in interfaces to the mix. I think the BlackBerry PlayBook was one of the most underrated tablets of all-time. More so than the HP Touchpad which went on that fire sale that same year. Both their UI was phenomenal that made both iOS and Android look archaic even by today's standards. Too bad BB10 lost the elements that made QNX so good.

    Yet, with Palm going under thanks to HP and BlackBerry on its way, both user interfaces became mere footnotes to the history of the industry while Apple, Google, and Microsoft get all the credit for innovation and original style. The thing with Android is you can always change up a few things visually. And it has swipe gesture shortcuts which makes navigating even easier while iOS you have to scour for apps, can't hide ones by default, and lacks a BACK button or Screen Off app which forces users to wear out a physical button if Assistive Touch isn't turned on.

    I am aware iOS can look cooler and unique while jailbroken. I was into Vista themes years ago. I even make iPhone OS 1.1.4 look like a desktop UI where right half of the screen had zero app icons before blank/invisible apps existed. But Android can be changed around rooted or not. I've seen many Android OEM's even outdo Google's stock look with better lockscreens or whatever. Even Nokia's Meego borrowed ideas from iOS. Rows of icons were always around before iOS. Hopefully, Material Design is branching away from the already archaic row of icons whether flat or skeumorphic and very LINEAR path/pattern habits that iOS possessed since inception.

    My favorite homescreen UI still comes from the Sony Ericsson Xperia X1 (2008). Too bad it had WinMo instead of Android and SE never wanted to expand on the tiles idea better which lacked any real-time live tiles. Sony did make purple/violet tones look appealing in later wallpapers. The tiles eventually moved into the Metro UI look which gave birth to Windows Phone's Live Tiles. Unfortunately, when Microsoft wanted it simpler for WP, it also lost some useful functionality that old Windows Mobile once possessed.

    The problem of wanting simpler is it gets boring fast (for us tech geeks) and it becomes too limiting. And it is very, very EASY to copy if its depth is shallow deep. Draw a stick figure and anyone can draw a stick figure just like it. Now iOS7 gave iOS a nice face-lift last year which some loved or hated. But wait another two years when people will start growing tired of the flat design. Even Material Design or Metro UI will get old fast. And without too many options of changing it, that's when users start wandering their eye to something else like Android which gives you more flexibility to experiment and with different skins. It isn't all about DESIGN but PHILOSOPHY too.

    I just left checking out the iPhone 6/6 Plus again. Any other phone store, same habits. All mobile OSes can look the same or different but human behavior will have similar habits and postures. People with slanted spines and stiffer necks staring at a small screen all day. Swiping left or right with our thumbs. Open an app to check of that millisecond difference in speed. With a tap or step less or more here and there. It doesn't matter what the OS looks like anymore, the human behavioral patterns is generally the same. The next revolution is no longer what the UI might look like but how a device changes our daily habits like what the Moto X tried doing last year. Design is one of the LEAST PRACTICAL area which is generally just eye candy that gets old fast.
     
  25. Oletros macrumors 603

    Oletros

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    #25
    What are you talking about? Android does that

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    Wrong, touchscreen smartphones had multitasking prior to iOS
     
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