iPhone 7 Camera Test Touts Excellent Exposure, Lower Noise, and Richer Colors

BootsWalking

macrumors 65816
Feb 1, 2014
1,229
6,929
I'm no photographer, but I've heard from a few in my company who work in the camera business that they wouldn't rely on this company for reviews. I'm not sure if it's due to their methodology or because they're too easily influenced by money they get from the manufacturers or both. Maybe some photographers on here can shed more light.

One thing they could have done better is to categorize the phones by size. Larger phones have more room for better sensors, lens, etc. and that's been the trend for a few years now. Lumping them all together is like including point and shoots with DSLRs.
It's a common refrain from those who don't like how DxOMark rates their favorite camera/camera brand. Not only does DxoMark disclose their methodology, their results have been independently reproduced by individuals who have done their own sensor measurements. Lenses are a different story - DxO's methodology for its lens testing is a big black box.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rGiskard

rGiskard

macrumors 68000
Aug 9, 2012
1,799
955
" topping the iPhone 6s by two points but trailing the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge and five other devices.
"

Looks like I can definitely skip this one. For the price of an iPhone it's camera should lead all but highly specialized smartphones. Maybe the 8 will at least improve significantly over my 6 Plus's camera.
 

GoodWheaties

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
670
646
I had to pick my Apple Watch up from the local Apple Store that was just in for repair this morning. I was waiting for them to bring it out from the back and started messing with the 7 and 7 Plus. I was amazed by the fact that the camera on the 7 was MUCH BETTER than the camera on the 7 Plus.

I was photographing the back of an iPhone on the other side of the display table. I first grabbed the 7 Plus and did the 2X zoom. The picture looked like crap. So I set it back to 1X and re-took the photo. It was much better but the image still wasn't that sharp compared to my 6 Plus. I then grabbed the 7 and took another photo of the same iPhone across the table. It was night and day difference. It seemed much, much sharper. I then zoomed in and took another photo at what I thought was the same focus as the 7 Plus on 2X zoom. It was even sharper than the 7 plus. I took both phones in each hand and looked at the photos side by side. I was amazed.

I asked the sales guy why the images were so bad. I though they were supposed to be better. He mentioned that there was a new OS coming out that would "make the background blurry" and it was much better. Wow... Thanks guy...

I think this dual camera stuff is a gimmick and not ready for prime time.
In any indoor shots, the 56mm camera will require much higher ISO due to f/2.8. (Roughly 2.3x for the same shutter speed) Hence the reduced quality. I still think it's worth having the option.
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,916
5,116
There's a saying among car enthusiasts "There's no replacement for displacement" The iphone still uses one of the smaller sensors in the flagship smartphone lineup.
Good point, although I was mostly just comparing iPhone to iPhone.

Also, there's no replacement for displacement, except forced induction.
 

AirunJae

macrumors regular
Apr 14, 2008
148
109
Indianapolis, IN



DxO Labs has published an in-depth iPhone 7 camera review, calling it "a very solid evolution over the iPhone 6s" after extensive testing. The single-lens smartphone achieved an overall DxOMark Mobile Score of 86, topping the iPhone 6s by two points...

Might want to recheck that. According to the DxO Labs ranking, the 7 is 2 points higher than the 6S Plus and 4 points higher than the 6S.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mspman

SoyCapitanSoyCapitan

macrumors 601
Jul 4, 2015
4,484
2,497
Paris



. The photo on the right, for example, rendered using the DCI-P3 color space, has richer reds displayed compared to the photo on the left rendered using the traditional sRGB color space.


The irony is that as I look at the image above in a web browser on my iPhone 6s I am aware that my browser only supports the sRGB color space, the whole image comparison above is an sRGB image and my screen isn't DCI-P3. Yet I see that the image on the right is more colourful simply because of software processing applied to the image. Apply processing to the left side too and there isn't going to be a noticeable difference.

In other words, we should be judging true RAW images side by side.
 

Relentless Power

macrumors Nehalem
Jul 12, 2016
30,323
30,563
Finally good to see a 7 camera review. All the ones I've read seem to be about the 7+.
I was wondering the same thing. Did others forget about the 4.7 iPhone model camera? It has been all about the dual camera and Bokeh feature since day one. I have the 4.7 iPhone and there is a difference from the 6s. Much improved.
 
  • Like
Reactions: keysofanxiety

DevNull0

macrumors 68020
Jan 6, 2015
2,252
4,335
Good review from DXOMark, but how can they not of uplifted the colour score from the 6s+ to the 7? The camera has gone from sRGB to DCI-P3, so surely even a nominal colour score increase should be reflected there? And if there's a an uplift in that score, it uplifts the whole score which may actually even put it technically higher up the rankings...

Unless the argument is that you can't benefit from DCI-P3 unless it's supported by the viewing interface - but that's surely not a scorable consideration of the camera?!
DCI-P3 and sRGB are colorspaces. They are ways of mapping between numerical data and color data. DCI-P3 is a better colorspace for photography and much better for HDR photos, but nowhere does Apple say how much of the DCI-P3 space the camera covers. It could be the exact same data in a different file format.

DXOMark does a very technical quantitative analysis. It's not people looking at a row of pictures and saying "yep, the color is better here".
 

GoodWheaties

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2015
670
646
It's a common refrain from those who don't like how DxOMark rates their favorite camera/camera brand. Not only does DxoMark disclose their methodology, their results have been independently reproduced by individuals who have done their own sensor measurements. Lenses are a different story - DxO's methodology for its lens testing is a big black box.
I don't know if I would go so far as to say DXO discloses everything because the final score is still not a straight average. Some metrics are clearly weighted more than others but which ones? And what if you value other properties of a sensor than the ones they picked? Resolution and low ISO dynamic range are a couple of the things that seem to affect the score more, yet they place less emphasis on high ISO performance and dynamic range despite IMO that being the more important aspect.
 

dude-x

macrumors regular
Mar 2, 2007
164
175
New York City
Looks like the iPhone doesn't t take good color pics, all the background is white.

What you're seeing is the effect of exposure. Wide color gamut means it can capture colors outside the sRGB color gamut. In other words, if this guy had something that was like a neon green, or a saturated red, it will be able to capture that.
That picture has mostly grays and a few reds and yellows.
 

JackANSI

macrumors 6502a
Feb 3, 2011
552
408
Looks like the iPhone doesn't t take good color pics, all the background is white.

This is what I've found. Not impressed at all with the iPhone 7 and 7+ camera in anything less than perfectly lit and staged scenes.

I've got a 19 year old Sony digital camera that could handle the pictured situation better than the iPhone 7...

Heck if the pictures weren't labeled I'd have guessed that the picture on the left was something like a Motorola RAZR (the old flip phone) and the one on the right was something from the $300-400 class in Nikon or Canon.
 

xDKP

macrumors 65816
Feb 27, 2011
1,450
1,073
Denmark
So-so (regular 7 here). There are improvements from the 6S in some low light scenarios, and in others no real difference. It also causes the phone to over-expose or blow things out more often in good lighting. Such is life for any phone trying to let in more light to compensate for low-light shots.
I actually beg to differ. I think low light has been marginally better the last few years but the step this year is the best so far - think it's a solid step up from the 6S and that regular-7 is getting OIS this gen is great (haven't tested it yet, but should be great)
 

rGiskard

macrumors 68000
Aug 9, 2012
1,799
955
So sensor size is a big factor in final image quality. The above suggests that the iPhone camera system may actually have better technology, but the smaller sensor results in a slightly lower score at the end of the day. Equalize the sensor size and then you can truly do an side-by-side comparison of image-processing by each phone.

This also suggests that the iPhone 7 Plus may end up with superior results over every other smartphone, due to its double-camera system (essentially double the effective sensor size).
No, the images can't be combined for enhanced IQ because to do so both lens sensor modules would need to be identical. Instead Apple used two different lens sensor modules for depth mapping and optical zoom.

Apparently they found that digitally zooming the result of two combined 28mm images from 1/3" sensors produces a worse image than that from a single 56mm lens on a 1/3.6" sensor. Or maybe it was just cheaper to add a 56mm 1/3.6" module than to add another 28mm 1/3" module? It will be interesting to see what the 7 Plus DxO review finds.

For comparison, the Galaxy S7 has a 1/2.5" camera sensor, making it's sensor area is 43% larger than the iPhone's 1/3" sensor. That's a big, easily noticable difference - about the same as that between a 1" sensor and an APS-C sensor. Such a shame that Apple aren't serious about image quality.

[doublepost=1475086511][/doublepost]
What haters?
Anyone who doesn't fluff Apple full time. It's not enough to own and use Apple products, we must prostrate ourselves to Apple's ultimate superiority and bask in the wisdom of Apple executives.
 

TwoFive3

macrumors member
Nov 6, 2008
54
20



DxO Labs has published an in-depth iPhone 7 camera review, calling it "a very solid evolution over the iPhone 6s" after extensive testing. The single-lens smartphone achieved an overall DxOMark Mobile Score of 86, topping the iPhone 6s by two points but trailing the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge and five other devices.

iPhone 7 has a wider DCI-P3 color gamut that allows for more vibrant colors compared to the traditional sRGB standard. The photo on the right, for example, rendered using the DCI-P3 color space, has richer reds displayed compared to the photo on the left rendered using the traditional sRGB color space.

Who's the broad?
 

macduke

macrumors G4
Jun 27, 2007
10,566
14,057
Central U.S.
It has a great camera. It's even better when you shoot in RAW and edit in Adobe Lightroom. I did that with my iPhone 7 recently, and the dynamic range you can get is incredible for a phone. I had to scale it down first, because even though it was well under the upload cap, the forums keep telling me the file is too big. But here is a scaled version which shows the dynamic range and color capabilities for editing in RAW:
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Ulisescm

JaySoul

macrumors 68030
Jan 30, 2008
2,587
2,680
A lot of us in the Sub-Forum for "Android etc" on here are starting to taking DxO reviews with a pinch of salt.

There are increasing amounts of irregularities with their reviews.
 

mspman

macrumors regular
Jun 7, 2007
218
67
Minneapolis, MN
Let's see what the Plus scores. I am very interested in seeing if two lenses work together to make a better image.

This is a reputable review site and there are 7 android phones ranked higher.
Including *last years galaxy model* AND all the current flagship releases from Samsung, Sony, Motorola, and HTC. All of them. I thought my 7+ camera was pretty good, I definitely noticed more detail than my 6+. I gotta say I'm hoping for a stellar review with the dual lenses, but I'm concerned because of the sensor size.
 

BootsWalking

macrumors 65816
Feb 1, 2014
1,229
6,929
I don't know if I would go so far as to say DXO discloses everything because the final score is still not a straight average. Some metrics are clearly weighted more than others but which ones? And what if you value other properties of a sensor than the ones they picked? Resolution and low ISO dynamic range are a couple of the things that seem to affect the score more, yet they place less emphasis on high ISO performance and dynamic range despite IMO that being the more important aspect.
They use mostly an arbitrary metric cutoff to arrive at their summary "use case" metrics. They describe it here:

https://www.dxomark.com/About/Sensor-scores/Use-Case-Scores
 

Macshroomer

macrumors 65816
Dec 6, 2009
1,126
525
This is what I've found. Not impressed at all with the iPhone 7 and 7+ camera in anything less than perfectly lit and staged scenes.
And I on the other hand are very impressed with it.
But what the heck do I know, I'm just a full time pro who makes solid six figures shooting photos...
 

WRX-SRQ

macrumors member
Sep 5, 2012
62
198
Tallahassee
People love to nitpick over which camera is the best of 2016, but if you go less than 10 years ago....this is what we had at our disposal....

http://snapsnapsnap.photos/iphone-6s-camera-comparison/

Im happy it's 2016.
You know what really shocked me in that comparison is the MASSIVE jump from the 3G to the 3GS. I was given a 3G by my father who hated the service of AT&T in his area at the time and so I was like sweet, and passed on the 3GS, as I didn't think it was much of a change. Now in retrospect and seeing that difference in camera, I'm blown away and feel stupid. I should have used my upgrade and sold the 3G, HAHAHA.