iPhone Camera Supplier LG Innotek Shuts Down a Factory Due to Coronavirus Case

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iPhone camera module supplier LG Innotek has closed one of its factories after a worker tested positive for coronavirus, reports Reuters. Located in Gumi, South Korea, the factory is close to Daegu, where most of the South Korean coronavirus cases have been confirmed. A company official stated that the plant will be closed on Monday for disinfection.


The report also mentions that Samsung has also been forced to shut down one of its factories in Gumi due to a worker contracting the virus. The factory will not fully reopen until Tuesday.

LG Innotek is an important supplier for Apple, and it remains questionable as to whether or not the factory will reopen on Tuesday. If the shutdown remains brief, there will unlikely be any major impacts on iPhone production.

Just a few days ago, Tim Cook did an interview with Fox Business in which he expressed optimism about things returning to normal. In regards to China, Cook said it "feels to me that China is getting the coronavirus under control." Apple has even begun sending care packages to those affected in the Hubei and Wenzhou provinces in China.

Article Link: iPhone Camera Supplier LG Innotek Shuts Down a Factory Due to Coronavirus Case
 
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[AUT] Thomas

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Mar 13, 2016
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Graz [Austria]
If I'm not mistaken, these rooms are clean rooms. Can't have any dust in the camera assy. As such I would expect they have HEPA filters, gloves, masks and general protection (something to wear on the head avoiding loss of hair in the work area). Contracting the virus on the actual work place should be rather difficult.
Areas of risk would be the cantina and locker rooms.
The virus dies at 27C I hear. Guessing that the summer will eradicate it.
No, it doesn't... Body temp is 36,5°C. >37°C is considered fever. 40°C is high fever. Temperature is unlikely to kill it under normal circumstances. However, what makes a huge difference is that in summer, people are generally in better shape, people are spending more time outdoors (rather than crowded indoor areas), the UV part of sunlight is basically sterilizing exposed areas and last but not least the climate is in favor of a healthy respiratory system (no cold, dry air). So, summer does turn the odds in our favor, but it doesn't prevent the virus. What I could imagine is that in summer there will be much higher percentage of cases that go unnoticed or mild. But that's just speculation at the moment... Time will tell.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_cold is a good reference.
if it doesn’t manage to mutate by then.
https://nextstrain.org/ncov ...likely not in a way that it will be a game changer.
 

cmaier

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If I'm not mistaken, these rooms are clean rooms. Can't have any dust in the camera assy. As such I would expect they have HEPA filters, gloves, masks and general protection (something to wear on the head avoiding loss of hair in the work area). Contracting the virus on the actual work place should be rather difficult.
Areas of risk would be the cantina and locker rooms.
No, it doesn't... Body temp is 36,5°C. >37°C is considered fever. 40°C is high fever. Temperature is unlikely to kill it under normal circumstances. However, what makes a huge difference is that in summer, people are generally in better shape, people are spending more time outdoors (rather than crowded indoor areas), the UV part of sunlight is basically sterilizing exposed areas and last but not least the climate is in favor of a healthy respiratory system (no cold, dry air). So, summer does turn the odds in our favor, but it doesn't prevent the virus. What I could imagine is that in summer there will be much higher percentage of cases that go unnoticed or mild. But that's just speculation at the moment... Time will tell.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_cold is a good reference.
https://nextstrain.org/ncov ...likely not in a way that it will be a game changer.
Re: the clean rooms - there are different classes of clean rooms (depending on how many parts per million of particles are acceptable) with different protections and outfits. Not sure what class this would be. But I can see getting sick in any case - the masks are not likely the kind of mask that would stop virus transmissions. I’ve worked in actual semiconductor clean rooms and the masks are certainly not medical quality in the ones I’ve been in.
 
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stylinexpat

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Mar 6, 2009
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Apple will for sure miss earnings this quarter but I reckon that has already been price in now perhaps.
 

[AUT] Thomas

macrumors 6502a
Mar 13, 2016
522
560
Graz [Austria]
Re: the clean rooms - there are different classes of clean rooms (depending on how many parts per million of particles are acceptable) with different protections and outfits. Not sure what class this would be. But I can see getting sick in any case - the masks are not likely the kind of mask that would stop virus transmissions. I’ve worked in actual semiconductor clean rooms and the masks are certainly not medical quality in the ones I’ve been in.
True that, but with wearing masks, the aerosol cloud of a sneezing/coughing person will be greatly reduced and then with the gloves on, people are much less likely to touch their face. Additionally, the filters should clean the air sufficiently. That's not a guarante that no one gets it there, but chances are greatly reduced.
And regarding the masks: The general public got that completely wrong... Those surgical asks are not protecting the wearing person from contracting the virus, but should help in case the wearing person is having the virus (which is why I generally appreciate people using them). If you want a mask to actually protect the wearing person an FFP2, better FFP3 mask should be used, but that's differnt story.
 

cmaier

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True that, but with wearing masks, the aerosol cloud of a sneezing/coughing person will be greatly reduced and then with the gloves on, people are much less likely to touch their face. Additionally, the filters should clean the air sufficiently. That's not a guarante that no one gets it there, but chances are greatly reduced.
And regarding the masks: The general public got that completely wrong... Those surgical asks are not protecting the wearing person from contracting the virus, but should help in case the wearing person is having the virus (which is why I generally appreciate people using them). If you want a mask to actually protect the wearing person an FFP2, better FFP3 mask should be used, but that's differnt story.
True, re: the gloves, though one time I was working with a guy and he was manually adding photoresist onto a wafer. To do this, the wafer is placed on a spinner and a drop of photoresist is placed in the middle. He put the wafer on slightly askew, and it precessed off the spinner, hit something and shattered, and a shard of silicon punctured his hand (it was literally sticking out of his hand). (The gloves are pretty thin latex, or latex-like material).

Yeah, has nothing to do with the virus, but it is a fun story.
 

Rainshadow

macrumors regular
Feb 16, 2017
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That’s the whole “it will go away when the weather gets warmer” theory being spread by certain people that cannot be mentioned except in a specific section of these forums.
I don’t know what section you’re talking about, but I’ve heard just that from the New York Times, National Geographic and other reputable news sources.

“One of the first studies to test how environmental conditions affect viral transmission was published in 2007, and it looked at how influenza spread through guinea pigs infected in a lab. High temperatures and in particular high humidity slowed the influenza spread, and at very high humidity levels, the virus stopped spreading completely.” - National Geographic.

All places Ive read this also point out that this virus could be different but don’t claim that such an idea is a consipiracy theory. No one is saying it’s going to “poof!” Go away... just slow in the spread due to environmental conditions of humidity, and heat.

I also read that is could come back in a vengeance in the fall however if we don’t take care of it effectively in the meantime.
 
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TheShadowKnows!

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Sep 30, 2014
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Not to worry, dudes.

Apple is sending VP Tony Blevins, known as the "Blevinator," (the architect of Apple's punishing supply chain tactics) to demand its suppliers to put on "boys' long-pants", or else be "Blevinated".
 

cmaier

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I don’t know what section you’re talking about, but I’ve heard just that from the New York Times, National Geographic and other reputable news sources.

“One of the first studies to test how environmental conditions affect viral transmission was published in 2007, and it looked at how influenza spread through guinea pigs infected in a lab. High temperatures and in particular high humidity slowed the influenza spread, and at very high humidity levels, the virus stopped spreading completely.” - National Geographic.

All places Ive read this also point out that this virus could be different but don’t claim that such an idea is a consipiracy theory. No one is saying it’s going to “poof!” Go away... just slow in the spread due to environmental conditions of humidity, and heat.

I also read that is could come back in a vengeance in the fall however if we don’t take care of it effectively in the meantime.
Nobody is claiming it will “poof just go away?” Nobody said it would go away like “magic?”

really?
 
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