iPod Classic hard drive failure

TribeFan1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 1, 2013
121
7
I have an iPod Classic, that is experiencing signs of hard drive failure similar to my old 80GB that died a while back. It is a 160GB Gen 7 Classic and upon the least sync to add 4 new songs and to include a new playlist, it will play 2/3 of one song, skips one, and the other 2 play as normal. On the new playlist, it will skip certain songs all together. So i have a couple questions. 1, Am I correct that this is hard drive failure? 2, Is there anything I can do to have the Apple Store near me repair/ replace it? I understand they won't repair it, but is there an out of warranty replacement option that I can use? I would prefer to pay to have it repaired for their white refurb box ones rather than do it myself just yet. Thanks for the help!
 

BrettApple

macrumors 65816
Apr 3, 2010
1,098
375
Heart of the midwest
Put it in diagnostic mode and check the SMART stats of the iPod.

I've already got a post about this here.

That will help you know if it is indeed your HDD (almost always is).

There are lots of options for replacements. I've done a few myself and it's been pretty simple, but I repair things all the time electronics, cars, trucks, plumbing, whatever. If you think you can do it yourself there are great guides on iFixit.

Otherwise, Apple may be able to help you out, but I'm not sure. Never been to an Apple store before and I don't know the status of Classic repairs.

A third party might be your best option. They could replace the hard drive, or use a CF/SD card as another option to prevent another failure down the road. There are a few places I've seen online that you can have it shipped to. But they usually cost quite a bit more than I think it's worth.
For example, I put in a 120 GB replacement HDD on an old 80GB classic for about $50 total. And another I put in a 64GB CF card plus adapter for $60 or so. But you've got to have patience and tools.

I'd imagine it wouldn't be less than $79.99 going through a business. But worth it if you use your iPod a lot. Mine is worth more to me than it would be in cash. So I repair it when it needs it. Most parts like the battery, faceplate, HDD, etc are replaceable. That's what's great about them.
 

TribeFan1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 1, 2013
121
7
So I got a chance to run the diagnostics and here are my results
Retracts: 3
Reallocs: 1088
Pending Sectors: 0
PowerOn Hours: 205
Start/Stops: 24965
Temp Current: 25C
Temp: Min 54C
Temp: Max 249C

Also I called the local Apple Store and the automated thing pretty much told me just to make a genius appointment. This is one of the times I would have rather been able to talk to a real employee. What do all of the stats mean? I understand the Reallocs and the Pending sectors, but the rest I could use a better understanding of.
 

vmaniqui

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2013
562
1
California
So I got a chance to run the diagnostics and here are my results
Retracts: 3
Reallocs: 1088
Pending Sectors: 0
PowerOn Hours: 205
Start/Stops: 24965
Temp Current: 25C
Temp: Min 54C
Temp: Max 249C

Also I called the local Apple Store and the automated thing pretty much told me just to make a genius appointment. This is one of the times I would have rather been able to talk to a real employee. What do all of the stats mean? I understand the Reallocs and the Pending sectors, but the rest I could use a better understanding of.
check this instructions by turingtest2 : https://discussions.apple.com/thread/5025610
 

gnasher729

macrumors P6
Nov 25, 2005
16,498
3,095
Also I called the local Apple Store and the automated thing pretty much told me just to make a genius appointment. This is one of the times I would have rather been able to talk to a real employee. What do all of the stats mean? I understand the Reallocs and the Pending sectors, but the rest I could use a better understanding of.
That's what the genius appointment is there for, talking to a real person.

Most likely they will suggest what is called an "out of warranty repair" but in reality they will replace your iPod with a new one, for a fixed price. For example, for the USA, this page https://support.apple.com/kb/index?page=servicefaq&geo=United_States&product=ipod says that "repair" for a 2009 Classic 160GB is $129. There is an older model which is called "obsolete" and only gets replaced in California for $179.
 

venomgt95

macrumors 6502
May 8, 2014
457
120
Michigan
I've got sort of the same problem with my 3rd gen classic. I hadn't used it in a bit so it died, and when i went to recharge it, it went to boot up, i can here the HDD spinning, but it never boots past the apple logo and the drive just spins and spins and spins. Ive tried resetting it. and it doesn't help. I have no clue what the issue is...it was working perfectly fine the week before. :( Now when i plug it in, it turns on, and the screen comes on for like 5 seconds, then it shuts off, but the drive keeps spinning.
 

matthew2926

macrumors 6502
Sep 13, 2013
405
69
Michigan
I've got sort of the same problem with my 3rd gen classic. I hadn't used it in a bit so it died, and when i went to recharge it, it went to boot up, i can here the HDD spinning, but it never boots past the apple logo and the drive just spins and spins and spins. Ive tried resetting it. and it doesn't help. I have no clue what the issue is...it was working perfectly fine the week before. :( Now when i plug it in, it turns on, and the screen comes on for like 5 seconds, then it shuts off, but the drive keeps spinning.
No joke, sometimes a problem with the hard drives on these classics can be fixed by hitting it firmly on your hand or knee.
 
  • Like
Reactions: oscar98

vmaniqui

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2013
562
1
California
I've got sort of the same problem with my 3rd gen classic. I hadn't used it in a bit so it died, and when i went to recharge it, it went to boot up, i can here the HDD spinning, but it never boots past the apple logo and the drive just spins and spins and spins. Ive tried resetting it. and it doesn't help. I have no clue what the issue is...it was working perfectly fine the week before. :( Now when i plug it in, it turns on, and the screen comes on for like 5 seconds, then it shuts off, but the drive keeps spinning.
that's what happened with my classic. i could hear the spinning hd on and on and wouldn't get pass the apple logo. i even tried the smack it hard or slam it on a carpet type of fixing but didn't work. although i heard some people had luck with it so you could try it as a last resort. in the end i decided to just get myself an ipod nano and had been using it for awhile now. just last week i decided to get my classic a new hard drive and followed the instructions on this forum ( i got a 120GB hdd from ebay). since i am fixing my hdd i decided to get a new battery too. when it was all fixed and done i hooked it up to my computer and had an unrecognized hdd message. i unhooked and hooked it back to my computer and at the second try it recognizes my hdd. now here's what i got.......one thing to remember though when you're changing the hard drive of the classic - it's a PIA to open it. i got scratches all over and have used different tools - screw drive, knife, putty knife and in the end the one that helped me open it was a thin metal from an old floppy drive. but once you're able to open it. the upgrade is a breeze. and putting back them on is easy too. good luck.

PS - i wish i tried the SSD but they're quite expensive for me.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

matthew2926

macrumors 6502
Sep 13, 2013
405
69
Michigan
that's what happened with my classic. i could hear the spinning hd on and on and wouldn't get pass the apple logo. i even tried the smack it hard or slam it on a carpet type of fixing but didn't work. although i heard some people had luck with it so you could try it as a last resort. in the end i decided to just get myself an ipod nano and had been using it for awhile now. just last week i decided to get my classic a new hard drive and followed the instructions on this forum ( i got a 120GB hdd from ebay). since i am fixing my hdd i decided to get a new battery too. when it was all fixed and done i hooked it up to my computer and had an unrecognized hdd message. i unhooked and hooked it back to my computer and at the second try it recognizes my hdd. now here's what i got.......one thing to remember though when you're changing the hard drive of the classic - it's a PIA to open it. i got scratches all over and have used different tools - screw drive, knife, putty knife and in the end the one that helped me open it was a thin metal from an old floppy drive. but once you're able to open it. the upgrade is a breeze. and putting back them on is easy too. good luck.

PS - i wish i tried the SSD but they're quite expensive for me.
Since you seem to be content with 120GB of storage, you could have used an SD card with a CF to SD adapter along with Taran adapter. This way, you can save money by using a SD card with your desired size rather than an SDD. SD cards also use a lot less battery than the original HDD and the model SSD route. Just a thought for anyone reading this thread looking for a solution to their HDD failure.
 

TribeFan1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 1, 2013
121
7
That's what the genius appointment is there for, talking to a real person.

Most likely they will suggest what is called an "out of warranty repair" but in reality they will replace your iPod with a new one, for a fixed price. For example, for the USA, this page https://support.apple.com/kb/index?page=servicefaq&geo=United_States&product=ipod says that "repair" for a 2009 Classic 160GB is $129. There is an older model which is called "obsolete" and only gets replaced in California for $179.
Thats what I was hoping for, and I hope the store near my will do that. I attempted to call just to see if they do it butI'll try to make an appointment this weekend. I am about to do more tests on the iPod using the recommendations above. Previously I had been to the apple store, a little over a year ago and asked a floor employee about battery replacement and she simply said they don't do that there, so thats why I'm a little skeptical of them doing the out of warranty repair. Thanks for all the help!
 

Ipod Collector

macrumors member
Feb 12, 2015
48
2
Thats what I was hoping for, and I hope the store near my will do that. I attempted to call just to see if they do it butI'll try to make an appointment this weekend. I am about to do more tests on the iPod using the recommendations above. Previously I had been to the apple store, a little over a year ago and asked a floor employee about battery replacement and she simply said they don't do that there, so thats why I'm a little skeptical of them doing the out of warranty repair. Thanks for all the help!
Hey Tribefan,

I was reading your messages on here about your issue with your classic.
Honestly, with the stats you posted of the smart data of the drive,
it's basically started it's plunge to eminent failure. You could possibly
try to put it in "disk mode" and do a complete format to the drive in
fat32 partition and restore through itunes after formatted.
You basically have 1088 reallocated sectors, written to a different part of the drive.

Here is the definition of reallocated sectors count:

"Count of reallocated sectors. When the hard drive finds a read/write/verification error, it marks that sector as "reallocated" and transfers data to a special reserved area (spare area). This process is also known as remapping, and reallocated sectors are called "remaps". The raw value normally represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped. Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. This allows a drive with bad sectors to continue operation; however, a drive which has had any reallocations at all is significantly more likely to fail in the near future.[3] While primarily used as a metric of the life expectancy of the drive, this number also affects performance. As the count of reallocated sectors increases, the read/write speed tends to become worse because the drive head is forced to seek to the reserved area whenever a remap is accessed. If sequential access speed is critical, the remapped sectors can be manually marked as bad blocks in the file system in order to prevent their use."

I also read your last message you posted about going to apple.

I was reading some of the threads on here when I read yours and noticed your problem
you stated with your classic. Then I saw your macrumors ID on here.
If you're in Cleveland, then your my neighbor somewhere around here.
Basically speaking, I fix ipods. I fix and mod classic ipods such as the 7th gen you have.
If you're in and/or around Cleveland area, and depending on what apple tells you about
your ipod, that if you'd like to contact me about it feel free to send me a private message
and I'd give you my phone number there. Simply put, I can do whatever you needed done
to your ipod if in need of repair and/or drive replacement, battery replacement, etc.
I also mod them to solid state drives. I can mod them to the point where even with
the battery that I use in the thick model classics I mod, I put a 1900mah battery in it,
which under normal working conditions the ipod would more than likely be good to go
for at least the next 10 years without any issues at all!

But I figured I'd post a message on here for you to give you an honest option for
whatever type of repair your ipod might need. PM me and we can go from there
if you'd like. I posted some pics of some of the latest modded ipods I've built.
These are the "gold series" models I've done. Both of them have been modded
to a 256gb samsung 1.8" ssd (solid state drive) and a 1900mah battery.
I ran a play test on this battery with a full charge to see how long the battery
would play on one charge on around 2/3's volume. It played for over 110 hours
before battery finally died. Every part is brand new except for the motherboard
and screen. I'll reuse the screen if it's still in good working order. Let me know
what you think of em....
 

Attachments

venomgt95

macrumors 6502
May 8, 2014
457
120
Michigan
No joke, sometimes a problem with the hard drives on these classics can be fixed by hitting it firmly on your hand or knee.
I tried that. No luck.

----------

that's what happened with my classic. i could hear the spinning hd on and on and wouldn't get pass the apple logo. i even tried the smack it hard or slam it on a carpet type of fixing but didn't work. although i heard some people had luck with it so you could try it as a last resort. in the end i decided to just get myself an ipod nano and had been using it for awhile now. just last week i decided to get my classic a new hard drive and followed the instructions on this forum ( i got a 120GB hdd from ebay). since i am fixing my hdd i decided to get a new battery too. when it was all fixed and done i hooked it up to my computer and had an unrecognized hdd message. i unhooked and hooked it back to my computer and at the second try it recognizes my hdd. now here's what i got.......one thing to remember though when you're changing the hard drive of the classic - it's a PIA to open it. i got scratches all over and have used different tools - screw drive, knife, putty knife and in the end the one that helped me open it was a thin metal from an old floppy drive. but once you're able to open it. the upgrade is a breeze. and putting back them on is easy too. good luck.

PS - i wish i tried the SSD but they're quite expensive for me.
Im glad you got yours fixed. Unfortunately for me, i have no money so i wont be buying a new HDD anytime soon.
 

vmaniqui

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2013
562
1
California
Since you seem to be content with 120GB of storage, you could have used an SD card with a CF to SD adapter along with Taran adapter. This way, you can save money by using a SD card with your desired size rather than an SDD. SD cards also use a lot less battery than the original HDD and the model SSD route. Just a thought for anyone reading this thread looking for a solution to their HDD failure.
i know. i should have gone that route. i was really contemplating on using SD card but for some reason got distracted when i saw the availability of the HDD. if this fails again i will definitely do that. but am hoping this HDD will last me a long time - am really hoping as i really had a hard time opening the classic and couldn't imagine myself doing that again. thanks.

PS - do you think i should stock up or this will still be available down the road (Tarken/CF-SD adapter, etc.)...
 

rgarjr

macrumors 603
Apr 2, 2009
6,470
313
Southern California
i know. i should have gone that route. i was really contemplating on using SD card but for some reason got distracted when i saw the availability of the HDD. if this fails again i will definitely do that. but am hoping this HDD will last me a long time - am really hoping as i really had a hard time opening the classic and couldn't imagine myself doing that again. thanks.

PS - do you think i should stock up or this will still be available down the road (Tarken/CF-SD adapter, etc.)...
Tarkan has been making and selling these ipod iFlash board since 2007. I just barely found out about them like 2-3 months ago.
 

matthew2926

macrumors 6502
Sep 13, 2013
405
69
Michigan
i know. i should have gone that route. i was really contemplating on using SD card but for some reason got distracted when i saw the availability of the HDD. if this fails again i will definitely do that. but am hoping this HDD will last me a long time - am really hoping as i really had a hard time opening the classic and couldn't imagine myself doing that again. thanks.

PS - do you think i should stock up or this will still be available down the road (Tarken/CF-SD adapter, etc.)...
Yea, I see his adapters being available for a while. Plus, he seems to be releasing new versions every now and again for each adapter, so I would recommend just buying one when you need it. Also, I would avoid those generic adapters that you find on Amazon or eBay. Tarkan's adapters are the way to go and they aren't unreasonably priced...
 

TribeFan1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 1, 2013
121
7
Hey Tribefan,

I was reading your messages on here about your issue with your classic.
Honestly, with the stats you posted of the smart data of the drive,
it's basically started it's plunge to eminent failure. You could possibly
try to put it in "disk mode" and do a complete format to the drive in
fat32 partition and restore through itunes after formatted.
You basically have 1088 reallocated sectors, written to a different part of the drive.

Here is the definition of reallocated sectors count:

"Count of reallocated sectors. When the hard drive finds a read/write/verification error, it marks that sector as "reallocated" and transfers data to a special reserved area (spare area). This process is also known as remapping, and reallocated sectors are called "remaps". The raw value normally represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped. Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. This allows a drive with bad sectors to continue operation; however, a drive which has had any reallocations at all is significantly more likely to fail in the near future.[3] While primarily used as a metric of the life expectancy of the drive, this number also affects performance. As the count of reallocated sectors increases, the read/write speed tends to become worse because the drive head is forced to seek to the reserved area whenever a remap is accessed. If sequential access speed is critical, the remapped sectors can be manually marked as bad blocks in the file system in order to prevent their use."

I also read your last message you posted about going to apple.

I was reading some of the threads on here when I read yours and noticed your problem
you stated with your classic. Then I saw your macrumors ID on here.
If you're in Cleveland, then your my neighbor somewhere around here.
Basically speaking, I fix ipods. I fix and mod classic ipods such as the 7th gen you have.
If you're in and/or around Cleveland area, and depending on what apple tells you about
your ipod, that if you'd like to contact me about it feel free to send me a private message
and I'd give you my phone number there. Simply put, I can do whatever you needed done
to your ipod if in need of repair and/or drive replacement, battery replacement, etc.
I also mod them to solid state drives. I can mod them to the point where even with
the battery that I use in the thick model classics I mod, I put a 1900mah battery in it,
which under normal working conditions the ipod would more than likely be good to go
for at least the next 10 years without any issues at all!

But I figured I'd post a message on here for you to give you an honest option for
whatever type of repair your ipod might need. PM me and we can go from there
if you'd like. I posted some pics of some of the latest modded ipods I've built.
These are the "gold series" models I've done. Both of them have been modded
to a 256gb samsung 1.8" ssd (solid state drive) and a 1900mah battery.
I ran a play test on this battery with a full charge to see how long the battery
would play on one charge on around 2/3's volume. It played for over 110 hours
before battery finally died. Every part is brand new except for the motherboard
and screen. I'll reuse the screen if it's still in good working order. Let me know
what you think of em....
I do like your work, particularly the black click wheel on the iPod. I'm actually down in Cincinnati, so when I have time I'll try to make it the the Apple Store here or one of them around here. Thanks for the offer, I'll definitely keep it under consideration. Does anyone know if there is a way to slow the imminent failure? I had an 80GB Classic years ago that did the same thing. It would start skipping songs or only play half, then eventually took multiple hours to sync. Luckily i have a spare that i bought after they cancelled, but I would still like to have this current one working well.
 

vmaniqui

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2013
562
1
California
I do like your work, particularly the black click wheel on the iPod. I'm actually down in Cincinnati, so when I have time I'll try to make it the the Apple Store here or one of them around here. Thanks for the offer, I'll definitely keep it under consideration. Does anyone know if there is a way to slow the imminent failure? I had an 80GB Classic years ago that did the same thing. It would start skipping songs or only play half, then eventually took multiple hours to sync. Luckily i have a spare that i bought after they cancelled, but I would still like to have this current one working well.
looks like a hdd about to fail. since there's so much movement with the hdd I don't think there's anyway you can slow down it's eminent failure. 80Gb hdd price is not so bad. you can get one for about $29.
 

Ipod Collector

macrumors member
Feb 12, 2015
48
2
I do like your work, particularly the black click wheel on the iPod. I'm actually down in Cincinnati, so when I have time I'll try to make it the the Apple Store here or one of them around here. Thanks for the offer, I'll definitely keep it under consideration. Does anyone know if there is a way to slow the imminent failure? I had an 80GB Classic years ago that did the same thing. It would start skipping songs or only play half, then eventually took multiple hours to sync. Luckily i have a spare that i bought after they cancelled, but I would still like to have this current one working well.
Hey there,

Thanks for the comment on the black/gold model.
That's my black gold Texas tea model :)

Ahhh, Cinci, gotcha! Well put it this way, as far as ipod goes, you can
try to reformat the drive itself by putting it into disk mode. Of course
it'll wipe your library clean, but depending on what "stage" it's in, it
might make it better on a more temporary fix. Honestly, I've used a
hard drive based model for so long of my own ipods and never had a
hard drive go bad on me, truly pretty much luck and nothing more.
I've tried my hardest though to keep from dropping or bumping them
into stuff and always kept it in some kind of case, considering I use
it at work alot.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Ipod Collector

macrumors member
Feb 12, 2015
48
2
I do like your work, particularly the black click wheel on the iPod. I'm actually down in Cincinnati, so when I have time I'll try to make it the the Apple Store here or one of them around here. Thanks for the offer, I'll definitely keep it under consideration. Does anyone know if there is a way to slow the imminent failure? I had an 80GB Classic years ago that did the same thing. It would start skipping songs or only play half, then eventually took multiple hours to sync. Luckily i have a spare that i bought after they cancelled, but I would still like to have this current one working well.
If you are crafty enough where you wanted to take a stab at it yourself, by all means go for it. If you didn't mind spending the minor amount of money they want on ebay for the metal classic pry tools, they are simply a must if you ever want to open your classic and save the back and front plates to reuse, not to mention that with the right tools and the proper patience with it, you can do it without putting a single scratch into it prying it open. It is an art to open them with the tools, but not hard to master it.
Put it this way, get the metal tools for the job and google a pic of the inside backplate of the ipod. I'll post a pic of the inside of backplate later if you wanted to check it out.

You'll see the tabs on the inside of the backplate that need to be "popped". I believe there is a total of 11 of them. 4 on each side, 2 on the bottom, 1 on top in between the hold button and headphone jack. The main thing is you want to be precise when popping tabs.
I usually start on lower right side of it and work my way up and then the bottom 2, then the middle one. I can usually pop them all first and "wiggle" the other 4 out gently on their own. Once you do get them all popped don't jar it open, you need to disconnect the battery ribbon cable from motherboard first. This is where you have to be real gentle to not pull battery tab up too far on motherboard to release battery ribbon cable, you don't want it to snap off. It's a tight fit but for something simple that does the trick take a paperclip, straighten one part of it out and put about a 3/16" 90 degree (L) shaped bend in the end of paperclip with a pair of needle nose pliers. You now have you battery tab lifter. You'll hear it "click" when you snap it up. It only snaps up about an 1/8" of an inch.You can now open the face plate to the left and set it down with back plate on right.

You'll see the other ribbon cable on left for the headphone jack and hold button. Gently lift the hard drive up and out from the top of it towards you. Underneath hard drive you'll see the tab on the motherboard on the left for the hold button ribbon cable. Snap the tab up on the right of it to the left, in up position. You can then pull ribbon cable out and set back plate to the side.

Ahhh, ok, well that's lesson one on how to open up an ipod classic...............
 
Last edited:

Ipod Collector

macrumors member
Feb 12, 2015
48
2
I do like your work, particularly the black click wheel on the iPod. I'm actually down in Cincinnati, so when I have time I'll try to make it the the Apple Store here or one of them around here. Thanks for the offer, I'll definitely keep it under consideration. Does anyone know if there is a way to slow the imminent failure? I had an 80GB Classic years ago that did the same thing. It would start skipping songs or only play half, then eventually took multiple hours to sync. Luckily i have a spare that i bought after they cancelled, but I would still like to have this current one working well.
I guess we can call lesson 2 removing the hard drive from motherboard.

You have one of two options to remove hdd. Both the motherboard and
hdd have zif type connectors on them. I personally tend to be more gentle
and remove cable from hard drive itself. I say gentle because you have to
lift the tab on hdd without snapping or breaking it. They are pretty much
impossible to snap back in. I use a hobby knife with a rounded edge blade
and pop the tab from the middle (balanced lift). You can also separate
ribbon cable from the board itself, but right underneath the ribbon cable
right before it goes into zif connector on motherboard there is a plastic
strip that is glued to mb and cable itself. Lift the zif tab on the mb, it
lifts up towards the bottom of tab from the upside. Then, as you are
holding hdd, I'll use my finger and thumb to grip cable and gently pull
cable at an angle upwards towards top of ipod to separate the glue
strip from mb. It'll usually stay connected to the cable itself. If you
do it yourself and have an extra hand around, you can have them
hold ipod down while you use one hand to hold drive and ribbon cable
and the other with a hobby knife to gently lift plastic glue strip away
from board, leave it attached to ribbon cable.

Lesson 3 will be installing new hard drive if you wanted to go that route.

I'll speak of that later if you wanted to know......
 

TribeFan1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 1, 2013
121
7
Update: I made it out to the Apple Store Genius Bar yesterday and they came to the same hard drive conclusion. I could either ride it out until it goes further or pay he $129 repair fee. So $129 later I have a brand new classic, and the customer service along the way was great. Thanks for all the help here!
 

vmaniqui

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2013
562
1
California
Update: I made it out to the Apple Store Genius Bar yesterday and they came to the same hard drive conclusion. I could either ride it out until it goes further or pay he $129 repair fee. So $129 later I have a brand new classic, and the customer service along the way was great. Thanks for all the help here!
when you say brand new, did they give you a sealed in the box classic as in really 'new' and they did not just change your hard drive?
 

TribeFan1

macrumors regular
Original poster
Oct 1, 2013
121
7
when you say brand new, did they give you a sealed in the box classic as in really 'new' and they did not just change your hard drive?
The thing is a brand new white box replacement, it hasn't even been powered on yet and it is sealed in the plastic wrapper. They do not repair iPod Classics, just issue new ones under the $129 repair price
 

vmaniqui

macrumors 6502a
Mar 8, 2013
562
1
California
The thing is a brand new white box replacement, it hasn't even been powered on yet and it is sealed in the plastic wrapper. They do not repair iPod Classics, just issue new ones under the $129 repair price
then that's a great deal for $129. can't beat the price. i just hope when 1 of my 120GB classic HD fails, they will still have stocks. i got 2 120GB and i replaced the HDD of the other one. still a good price as i was able to buy a HDD for $35. but if i have a choice then, i would have done it a long time ago on my 1 failing hdd. didn't know they have that process. congrats on your new classic.
 

Yebubbleman

macrumors 68030
May 20, 2010
2,940
289
Los Angeles, CA
I have an iPod Classic, that is experiencing signs of hard drive failure similar to my old 80GB that died a while back. It is a 160GB Gen 7 Classic and upon the least sync to add 4 new songs and to include a new playlist, it will play 2/3 of one song, skips one, and the other 2 play as normal. On the new playlist, it will skip certain songs all together. So i have a couple questions. 1, Am I correct that this is hard drive failure? 2, Is there anything I can do to have the Apple Store near me repair/ replace it? I understand they won't repair it, but is there an out of warranty replacement option that I can use? I would prefer to pay to have it repaired for their white refurb box ones rather than do it myself just yet. Thanks for the help!
Yeah, Apple will still do the swaps for a "new" 160GB one; doesn't matter which gen of classic you have. Though, I'd give thought to trying to mod it with flash storage; those hard drives really suck.