Is iOS 8 bad coding or planned obsolescence?

Discussion in 'iOS 8' started by Imory, Oct 28, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Imory macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Location:
    Wonderland
    #1
    People have been talking about the bugs in iOS 8 and those that still persist in iOS 8.1, so the question I've been asking myself is if Apple really need more time to deliver a proper point update (like the months it took to release 7.1) or if this is something else?

    Now, before I start I'd like to point out that I generally feel that the worst part about iOS 8 is really the performance in terms of speed and smoothness, unlike people generally complaining about certain bugs or crashes. Perhaps this belongs in that category as well. I have one 5, two 5S's and people sharing their opinion on how iOS 8 runs on the new 6 devices.

    First off, I've mentioned it before, but the weather app in iOS 8 will still lag regardless if you're using 5, 5S or 6. Going through the list view and detailed view, flicking between several cities, you'll notice frames drop and that 60 fps isn't really in the weather app at all. This never happens on a separate 5 I have running iOS 7.

    The other thing I've noticed on two 5S's is this:

    That might have been an overreaction, but the point remains. You might be thinking I'm nitpicking, but these small things, coupled with different bugs and other issues of performance does end up to a conclusion that the so called "flawless" experience or smoothness is not really there anymore. That 60 fps experience that was pretty much constant, is sort of missing, for now. Are these the small steps of planned obsolescence?

    [​IMG]

    Now people might be saying that iOS has become more sophisticated, which is true, but judging by the increase in CPU and GPU performance from the A8 since the first iPhone (50 times = CPU, 84 times = GPU), would you say that the system requirements of iOS has gone up that much as well? Without being a software engineer at Apple, I wouldn't really say so. The A6, A7 and A8 are all still very powerful and capable chipsets and given how it seems that we're entering a tick-tock phase with not the huge jumps as we've seen before, these chipsets should still last for quite some time without hiccups.

    How do you feel about this? Do you share a similar sentiment? Do you agree or completely disagree? Unfortunately I feel I need to add that I have no intention of switching to a different phone etc. So all questions or claims that I should stop complaining and leave will be redundant. I'm heavily invested into this OS and the ecosystem in general.

    All I'm asking is a genuine discussion of how you feel your phone is working and if you share the same thoughts.
     
  2. MaciMac100 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2014
    #2
    Good post. Very well written.

    Im thinking it could be both... Planned obsolence for sure (which is like flipping finger to customers). But because there are so many bugs in iOS8, its also bad coding.
     
  3. revs macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2008
    Location:
    Worcestershire
    #3
    I think its more a case of trying to do too much too quickly.

    If you ever listen to podcasts with ex-apple employees (e.g. Debug podacst - http://www.imore.com/debug-48-melton-ganatra-episode-ii-understanding-apple) they talk a lot about the iOS life cycle. Sounds like they release a new version of iOS, they then spend the first couple of months fixing bugs. Then they have a few months of planning the next release, and in the end have maybe 3 or 4 months in order to code. So to us its 12 months between releases, but actually its only 3-4 where they have time to code things.

    I hold out hope that instead of new features, they start looking to bug fixes and performance. Maybe a iOS 8.5 instead of 9!
    I also hope that having the iPad Mini 1 still around means they may take the performance improvements for older hardware mroe serious.. but thats wishful thinking!

    Another small point is that, according to the ex-apple employees, they never ever do any sort of planned obsolescence, or code anything to be slow on old hardware. They actually get quite angry when people even suggest that they do - so i'm going to believe them :)
     
  4. oneshotpro Suspended

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2014
    #4
    They've gotten so big they had to hire mediocre devs from other companies who don't care and or hate apple.
     
  5. Imory thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Location:
    Wonderland
    #5
    Thanks!

    Perhaps. That's sort of what I'm thinking simply because of the results. Maybe a sign of a company resting on their laurels (insane sales) or just plain complacency?

    That is worrying. I guess when you're in a such a competitive market you have to balance the way of delivering a solid and smooth experience, while also battling the problem of competitors offering new features. I sort of saw the A6 as the first real truly mature chipset that would deliver performance to handle tasks like browsing, photo editing, shooting video, day to day tasks with ease for quite some time. A smooth experience that wouldn't really deteriorate as quickly over time.

    Let's hope not, but results are what really matter. If they decided to just simply ignore the problem and move on or if it's planned obsolescence, is something doesn't really matter in the end.

    I don't know anything about mediocre developers, but it's true that Apple has gotten huge. I can't comment though if that has compromised their work ethic, since I feel that would really show in sales and reviews.
     
  6. xWhiplash macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    #6
    Isn't sluggish or performance issues always the case with new OS on older hardware? Every time I upgraded my phone, even back in the 3G days, it would get slower and more of a pain. Going from iOS 5 to iOS 6 on older phones resulted in similar issues. Even though they had the same design.

    My mom's 4S is extremely sluggish with the latest iOS 7. It just is the way it is.
     
  7. donnaw macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2011
    Location:
    Austin TX
    #7
    I'm surprised at this revelation. When I was working in software development we had two teams, one working on code, implementation, and bug fixes on the current version. The other team would be working on the next version and they would then switch places. Of course, coordinating the two caused some headaches but not too any because by the time the second team was ready to take over the 'current' version was pretty stable.

    If Apple is using the system described then that explains, but not excuses, the bugs and lack of fixes. If nothing else I would hope they have a dedicated team to fix bugs. But it sounds like they don't.
     
  8. MaciMac100 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2014
    #8
    I have to correct this... Isn't sluggish or performance issues always the case with new iOS on older hardware? Sorry...

    Because its not the case with other OS:

    http://www.phonearena.com/news/Goog...of-RAM-when-optimizing-Android-KitKat_id49768

    I dont like Android for many reasons but its fair to give them credit when they deserve it.
     
  9. kazmac macrumors 601

    kazmac

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Location:
    Stuck in an early 70s giallo
    #9
    Thank you for posting this. Sounds like they are spread thin. I think it would benefit everyone if they spaced the iOS and perhaps the iPhones to every 18 months. Allow for more time to catch the bugs before they go out into the wild and give coders time to work on new features and/or new OS.
     
  10. xWhiplash macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    #10
    We are not talking about Android here. In the past, any time I upgraded my iPhone (even the iPhone 3G) from the stock OS to a newer one, I get sluggish performance.
     
  11. kiranmk2 macrumors 6502a

    kiranmk2

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    #11
    I definitely think it's trying to do too much too quickly. After all, they now have to do a new iOS and a new OSX every year. Plus bug fixes. I don't know why we have to have a new OSX every year but I think the strain is showing.

    I like the idea of a iOS x.5 on alternate years where they concentrate on getting the performance up rather than introducing new features - perhaps it's time to split the Apple apps out from iOS so they can get updates throughout the year rather than waiting for the yearly iOS bump. I don't know how they'd do this though - would the x.5 'mature' OS be launched with e S range of 'mature' phones which might lead to lower demand of the non-S range or be launched with the non-S phones which would risk having either ver 1 hardware or software whenever you got a new phone!

    I can't believe iOS 8 i planned obsolescence. There are too many people on A5 devices (myself included with an iPad 2 and, temporarily and iPhone 4s). Apple trades on its user experience and allowing this many people to have buggy, slow iOS updates that greatly detract from the experience risks a lot of people new to Apple jumping ship as they realise their £4-500 investment just 3 years ago (iPad 2/3) is now actually a pain to use. I've state before that it would be much better for Apple to either spend longer optimising its code or cut older devices from the update. After all, surely this says to users - "you still have a good performing system, but if you want all the latest features you need a new device". Rather than the current "you're device now sucks - you should pony up for a new one"
     
  12. MaciMac100 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2014
    #12
    Thats why I added that i in front of OS. See.
     
  13. xWhiplash macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    #13
    Good for android OS. My point was, this has always been a problem with iOS. I have experienced it first hand. I always need the latest OS, so I just deal with the issues. This isn't Apple having bad code, or planned obsolescence, it is just the way it has always been. Older phones with newer iOS have always had some performance issues.

    iOS 8 runs perfectly on iPhone 6 and I bet it does on iPhone 6+. When I had it on my 5S, yeah there were a few times where it had dropped frames or was a LITTLE sluggish, but it was not bad.
     
  14. MaciMac100 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2014
    #14
    Good. Then we can agree that this an iOS disease. Not general OS disease.
     
  15. Imory, Oct 28, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2015

    Imory thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Location:
    Wonderland
    #15
    And I don't really find that acceptable, but I will say that the leaps we saw in the beginning of modern smartphones and iPhones still to some degree made sense.

    Now though the hardware (SoC) have matured and therefore we shouldn't really see these modern devices get sluggish performance. A6 and above reached a point where they delivered great performance and the software hasn't made tremendous leaps to warrant slower/sluggish performance. That's point I'm making. There's no visual difference between iOS 7 and 8, yet the devices are slower. Why is that? People say that iOS 8 went through an overhaul beneath the surface, but since A8 isn't really a much of a difference compared to A7, Apple should be able to deliver a smooth experience on both devices.

    Problem is though, apparently iOS 8 isn't running as smoothly as it should on the new 6.

    ----------

    That's completely unacceptable though. You shouldn't accept it as a "this is the way it is". Why is that? Why should an older device have a problem? In this case the A7 shouldn't have any problems whatsoever compared to the A8. I would even argue that the A6 should be included there.

    iOS 8 doesn't run perfectly though, the instance I mentioned applies to the new phones as well.
     
  16. xWhiplash macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    #16
    It runs perfectly on my iPhone 6. Are you referring to the 6+? I do not have one so I cannot say what the performance is like.
     
  17. I7guy macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    What Exit?/Saguaro Country
    #17
    I don't think either. It's not bad coding or obsolescence. It's the inability to see how the o/s is used after release.

    I have a 5s and my issues are generally around safari. I guess i could use chrome but why bother.
     
  18. Imory thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Location:
    Wonderland
    #18
    Referring to both. Do what I mentioned in the weather app and recents in the phone app. You experience no frames dropping? If anything it should run flawlessly on their new devices.
     
  19. KPOM macrumors G5

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2010
    #19
    I have an iPhone 6 and recently purchased a used iPhone 5c to access a Verizon UDP. While I don't have much on the 5c, I don't notice any lag in the weather app. The iPhone 6 is my daily phone and I think that the performance is fine. I probably wouldn't recommend iOS 8 on an iPad mini (A5) or iPhone 4s, but on an A6 or above it seems acceptable. I'm sure we'll get some performance updates in 8.2 and 8.3. Apparently Apple had 3 point updates in parallel development. 8.1 was focused on bug fixes and Apple Pay. 8.2 will probably be focused on performance, and my guess is 8.3 will add the Watch functions.

    I think the larger issue is that Apple is fixed to an annual product cycle, and they want to release each new iPhone with a new version of iOS. Android OEMs, and Samsung in particular, release phones throughout the year, and don't necessarily coincide new releases with new versions of Android (since they don't control when Google releases them).
     
  20. Imory thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Location:
    Wonderland
    #20
    Really? I'm genuinely surprised seeing as there are those reporting they do in fact experience those problems. We should all technically be experiencing the same problems seeing as we all have identical phones in terms of hardware and software (third party apps have no effect).
     
  21. highlightshadow macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    #21
    I don't think, at the moment, its planned obsolescence
    I think its just a mess - last year they made a major move to 64-bit and we all know there were many issues ....

    Took what? 9 months before we got a really stable iOS7?

    iOS8 is arguably more of a change in that they opened up a lot of previously private areas of the OS to change by 3rd parties ... and wow... we have a lot of issues again.

    iOS8 has been bad enough for me this time, coupled with last years iOS7 launch, to make me go from a day-1 buyer (have done for last 4 or 5 devices) to never buying a day 1 again

    I just think Apple and Google have opposing problems...

    Apple started tight and controlled and is struggling to relax that without issues... Google started open and loose and is taking time to tighten it up and is compatibility issues issues similarly. Nothings perfect... and testing can only show so much and when its unleashed to dozens of millions devices / users in 1 day then yeah ... crap happens.
     
  22. Armen macrumors 604

    Armen

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2013
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #23
    Here's the thing:

    - If Apple excludes a certain generation of iDevice from an upgrade those who own that device will take to these forums with "Apple is forcing me to upgrade my device because this version of iOS is not available to me!"

    -If Apple tries to include the oldest iDevice it can into the iOS upgrade crowd then people take to these forums moaning "Apple is trying to force me to upgrade because my device doesn't run the latest iOS properly!"

    There is just no winning either way. Apple cannot keep signing older versions of iOS because that would not only cause more fragmentation but a lot of vulnerabilities were patched after its release.
     
  23. DomC macrumors 6502

    DomC

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2010
    #24
    Apple obviously designs an OS to run the best on the most recent model. Everything older is a trickle down effect. The newest OS may run OK on some older devices, some not as well. But in the end, I don't think it really matters a whole lot in their bigger picture. They keep selling new devices regardless. And with the Chinese market opening up more, what really is the incentive to care about older equipment running smoothly when you have all those potential new buyers?
     
  24. Imory thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Location:
    Wonderland
    #25
    While I understand your point, it's not really what I'm trying to state. The iPhone 5, 5S should have no problem handling the OS and this is not about withholding future updates.

    ----------

    Interestingly enough, as someone pointed out earlier, Android doesn't really seem affected by it (the nexus/pure Android line).

    Sure, that's a fair point. A case could be made that as long as they sell then why care? That would be them becoming complacent.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page