Is it possible to damage the trackpad by pressing hard

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by aevan, Dec 14, 2016.

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  1. aevan macrumors 68000

    aevan

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2015
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    Serbia
    #1
    Sure, the Force Trackpad doesn't really click. But it's not solid either. It flexes under pressure, instead of moving on a hinge - like non-force models do. And since it's made out of glass, does this mean you can press it too hard and break it? I'm almost scared to use the firm force press (the second click, when you keep pushing after the first one) on it. I also have the Magic Trackpad 2 for my iMac that is also Force Touch, but there the glass surface feels more solid somehow. I'm never scared of breaking it.

    I'm sure it's just in my head, but wanted to see what others have to say about it.


    Also, I noticed I cannot really press the trackpad at the left and right edge (exactly on edge), aproximately at 1/5 from the bottom.
     
  2. New_Mac_Smell macrumors 68000

    New_Mac_Smell

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2016
    Location:
    UK / China
    #2
    You're scared you're going to break it by pressing too hard? Well, I would say yes you could probably manage that, although you'd like break your finger before the trackpad. It's a solid piece of glass, yes it flexes a little (I've seen other posts you're made regarding it moving 1mm...), but it's not something like a thin piece of pane glass. Don't worry about your trackpad so much!
     
  3. aevan thread starter macrumors 68000

    aevan

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    Feb 5, 2015
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    Serbia
    #3
    I don't remember mentioning it, but if I did - it was for my previous trackpad. It does move, but as I said, it feels sturdier. No worries, just curious. Thanks.
     
  4. blairian89 macrumors 6502

    blairian89

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    Dec 5, 2016
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    Texas
    #4
    It's glass and it can be broken; how much force does that take?

    More than I want to know...I'd be more worried about something hitting it and breaking it than your finger breaking it.
     
  5. Fzang macrumors 65816

    Fzang

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    Jun 15, 2013
    #5
    Hold an iPad into the light and you can also see the entire display bend when you press down on it. Doesn't crack.
     
  6. WhiteWhaleHolyGrail macrumors 6502a

    WhiteWhaleHolyGrail

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    Nov 14, 2016
    #6
    Slow motion footage of the touchpad/iPad glass flexing would be cool to see in my humble nerdy opinion.
     
  7. TofSanity macrumors 6502a

    TofSanity

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2010
    #7
    I don't know about breaking but you can defiantly see the it flexing in the middles on the keyboard and palm sides of the trackpad. I thought it was just mine but I experienced the same flexing at both Apple & Best Buy on their displays.
     
  8. miamialley macrumors 68030

    miamialley

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    #8
    Doesn't mean it's good to do it. Over time creates problems. Bend a rod once and it may not break, but bend it twice and snap.
     
  9. blairian89, Dec 14, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2016

    blairian89 macrumors 6502

    blairian89

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2016
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    Texas
    #9
    There is truth to your statement; repeated stresses will eventually weaken and break any object. I doubt that through normal use and wear / tear that any of us will see the trackpad cracking or breaking.
     
  10. jerryk macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #10
    I am sure you could break it by pressing hard enough, after all you are touching glass. But you would have to use quite a bit of force, well beyond normal use. After all, an iPhone 7 plus with taptic feed back is also a big glass surface and you do not hear about people breaking those in normal use.
     
  11. Fzang macrumors 65816

    Fzang

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    #11
    Actually, it's not as simple as that. It's true that nothing lasts forever, and although elastic deformation has its limits, this could lie well beyond the usable lifetime of the device, e.g. maybe you'd have to push the iPad glass for 100 years with your fingers under normal usage to induce an actual significant change in the material.
     

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