Is my MBP hard drive dying? (Early 2011 model)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by VictoriaSobocki, May 29, 2017.

  1. VictoriaSobocki macrumors newbie

    VictoriaSobocki

    Joined:
    May 29, 2017
    #1
    Images here: http://imgur.com/a/Vs6fi

    Specs: MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2011) A1278 / 2,3 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8 GB 1333 MHz DDR3 / Macintosh HD / Intel HD Graphics 3000 512 MB

    I'm interested in buying a used MBP (late 2013 model), A1502, 2,8 GHz, 512 MB SSD, 8 GB RAM – is this a good choice compared to other laptops on the used Apple market?

    Thank you in advance! :)
     
  2. ApolloBoy macrumors 6502a

    ApolloBoy

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #2
    You might want to consider replacing the hard drive with an SSD and getting a new battery, although the late 2013 MBP certainly isn't a bad replacement computer.
     
  3. VictoriaSobocki thread starter macrumors newbie

    VictoriaSobocki

    Joined:
    May 29, 2017
    #3
    Thanks for the quick reply and for the advice. Either way, do you think that my hard drive is quitting sometime soon?
     
  4. ApolloBoy macrumors 6502a

    ApolloBoy

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #4
    Well regardless if your hard drive is dying or not you should still consider an SSD upgrade, it'll be a massive performance boost compared to a hard drive. I'd also consider doing a backup while you can.
     
  5. New_Mac_Smell macrumors 68000

    New_Mac_Smell

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2016
    Location:
    UK / China
    #5
    Nothing there points to a HDD failure, there's also very little way to determine if a HDD failure is imminent. The only solution is to replace it after a few years of use. However this really isn't practical and is why you should make regular backups. The HDD will fail, but it could be next week or another 5 years, and you could say that of most HDD's over 4 years old. It's a mechanical device and as such there's a lot of varying external factors that go into its current condition.

    Even SSD's have their limits, although are not mechanical so easier to give an accurate lifespan on. Either way just make regular backups of important data as you should anyway, never rely on a single point of failure for anything critical.

    The issues you're currently having are possibly software related, Apple would probably get you to reinstall your OS. However, given the age of the machine and you're comment on the battery I would hazard a big guess that it is the fault. The 'SMC', NVRAM or whatever are controlled by a capacitor (Normally a CMOS battery on older machines and probably still windows), this battery is what keeps the time and stuff. If your battery is faulty (And at 6 years it's more than likely) then there could be an issue in this capacitor receiving a charge or failing somewhere.

    So if moneys tight (Which I'm guessing it is if you're looking at a 2013 model) then I'd suggest you replace the battery, you could even just open it up and check it for physical signs of age (If it looks swelled then replace immediately). This should only be about $70 and will likely solve the problem.

    If you are dead set on a new MBP then a 2013 would be fine, there is no better or worse model available, just get the newest one you can afford really. However I'd note that it wouldn't be exceptionally better than your current model, and may still have battery issues given that it's still an older machine.

    Hope that helps! Back up your data and consider swapping the battery.
     
  6. Fishrrman macrumors G4

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #6
    Put an SSD into it.
    Don't spend a lot, get one that's 240 or 480gb.
    It's easy to install (with the right tools) -- a 15-minute job.

    Much cheaper and than buying a 2013 (which isn't "new enough").
    I'll bet an SSD solves your problems.
     
  7. ZapNZs macrumors 68020

    ZapNZs

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    #7
    This does not necessarily mean a HD failure. You can try running a SMART program like DriveDX or SmartMonTools, which pulls HD diagnostics. You can also run the Apple Hardware Test or Apple Diagnostics to look for other hardware-related issues. If both come back clean, a fresh OS X reinstall may be worth trying.
     

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