Is the constant IR light bad for our eyes?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by iphoneuser227, Nov 9, 2017.

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  1. iphoneuser227 macrumors regular

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    #1
    It's well known that the IR light sensor on the iPhone X is constantly flashing at us, undetectable to our eyes. It does show up if you record a video of the iPhone X display while on. Even though we can't physically see this, is it bad for our eyes?
     
  2. iphoneuser227 thread starter macrumors regular

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    #4
    Hmm. :D
     
  3. eoblaed macrumors 68020

    eoblaed

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    #7
    I did my own research when it was first announced. I don't have the links anymore, but you can look it up yourself: the strength of the IR emitter in the phone is far too weak to cause any damage to the human eye.

    I doubt it would've been been approved by the regulatory committees if it was anyway.
     
  4. iphoneuser227 thread starter macrumors regular

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  5. mazdamiata210 macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    Yeah except everyone who has any type of IR scanner complains about the same issues.
     
  6. eoblaed, Nov 9, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017

    eoblaed macrumors 68020

    eoblaed

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    #10
    How often the IR light is used isn't the issue. It's the strength (and wavelength) of the IR.

    An analogy would be ambient light in a room. You can have that ambient light on constantly, 24 hours a day, and it won't damage your eyes.

    Also, the IR used is (almost certainly) mid-IR which our eyes will be opaque to. (near-IR is used in a lot of industrial applications but isn't good for this sort of use-case). The power levels required are so small that even if our eyes weren't opaque to them, it still wouldn't be harmful.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 9, 2017 ---
    And the distinction between near-IR and mid-IR has nothing to do with distance from the emitter to the 'target'. It has to do with how close to the visible light spectrum the wavelength is. Near-IR is very close to the visible light spectrum. Mid-IR is further away, and Far-IR is, well, the furthest away that could still be considered IR.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 9, 2017 ---
    Also, mid-IR has the benefit of being able to distinguish between different types of organic surfaces. Near-IR doesn't have this characteristic. This is probably why FaceID can't be fooled even by hollywood quality masks; the synthetic rubber doesn't read the same as human skin.
     
  7. xsimplyjosh macrumors regular

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    #11
    It needs to be more intense for it to be any bad for me HARDLY even notice it is there!!!
     
  8. Relentless Power macrumors Penryn

    Relentless Power

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    #13
    I Don't think there's enough testing or scientific data to prove otherwise at this moment. But it's likely something Apple has considered or at least determined before they manufactured an iPhone into the millions. I personally don't believe long term this would be a concern.
     
  9. Steve28 macrumors regular

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    #14
    Guys, the sun emits ir light. Your stove does too. As well as a fire, your hair dryer, your body, the hot water running out of your faucet, every star you see in the sky, the pavement you’re driving over o the way home, etc. Anything that gives off heat is IR...heat is radiated in infrared. Oh, so does your tv remote control, the headlights in cars, the desk lamp....

    That’s how the police helicopters find perps at night.. using the FLIR (forward looking infra-red) cameras to see the IR being emitted from the bodies...

    Education. It’s awesome.
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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14 November 9, 2017