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Israeli newspaper Haaretz notes that the country's Communications Ministry has blocked the import of all iPads into the country pending an assessment of whether the device meets the country's power standards for Wi-Fi signals. In addition, customs officials have been instructed seize the devices from travelers attempting to bring them into the country.
"The iPad device sold exclusively today in the United States operates at broadcast power levels [over its WiFi modem] compatible with American standards," explained the officials. "As the Israeli regulations in the area of WiFi are similar to European standards, which are different from American standards, which permit broadcasting at lower power, therefore the broadcast levels of the device prevent approving its use in Israel," said the officials.
The report cites a customs official at Tel Aviv's Ben-Gurion International Airport who claims that his staff has confiscated ten iPads from travelers, even from those who declared that they were carrying them and offered to pay import taxes as required by law. One affected user reports that he was told to send the device back, while being charged daily fees for storage at the customs warehouse.

The Associated Press has picked up on the story and notes that while Israel hold similar power standards to European countries, it is the only one so far to have banned import of iPads.

Article Link: Israel Bans Imports of iPads Pending Certification of Wi-Fi Power Output
 

lozanoj83

macrumors 6502a
Mar 5, 2006
546
0
Southern California
If most of Europe already allows the iPad to be jn their countries, abet through US people, why can't Israel? Don't they have the standards as Europe?
 
Comment

macintologist

macrumors 6502
May 3, 2004
484
579
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_1_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile/7E18 Safari/528.16)

This is ridiculous. What about straight up MacBooks and laptops they broadcast I'm sure. What the hell??
 
Comment

RaZaK

macrumors regular
Jul 13, 2008
224
0
what?

is there a stronger word in the English language than "asinine" to describe Israel's actions against the iPad. "Wi-Fi Power Output" levels? Really???

What is Israel's vendetta against Apple products, by the way? First, they obliterate an MBP. Now, they're Gitmo'ing iPads???
 
Comment

indy1979

macrumors newbie
Apr 8, 2008
24
0
Couldn't something like that be controlled by software and geo-location?

iPad detects it's in a European nation and turns down the power...
 
Comment

guzhogi

macrumors 68040
Aug 31, 2003
3,246
1,196
Wherever my feet take me…
Couldn't something like that be controlled by software and geo-location?

iPad detects it's in a European nation and turns down the power...

According to the article:

American standards, which permit broadcasting at lower power

So iPads may already be transmitting at lower power. However, I don't know the specifics, so I'm not sure what's going on. But excellent idea.
 
Comment

Ted13

macrumors 6502a
Dec 29, 2003
619
323
NYC
This has nothing to do with the US Government and they won't care.

A product doesn't comply with Israel's Wi-Fi regulations, so they ban it. There's nothing the US Government can do.
The US government has started trade wars with plenty of European countries over similar things -- like the EU requiring labeling of GMO food products led to 300% tariffs on all sorts of European imports from designer bags to Roquefort cheese.
 
Comment

renewed

macrumors 68040
Mar 24, 2009
3,068
6
Bemalte Blumen duften nicht.
They have laws. People who enter the country should obey those laws. I don't see the big deal. Leave your iPad at home or bring it and risk having it confiscated.

It's their country, not ours. I'm tired of people saying "well it's ok in the US" as if we are the standard. It's their own freaking country, let them control it and we can control ours.

I mean how would we like it if people came here breaking our laws who weren't citizens and then expecting us to make exceptions? (Oh wait, forgot about our southern neighbor :D)
 
Comment

Veri

macrumors 6502a
Sep 23, 2007
611
0
Wading past the pro/anti-Israel trolls, it's got to be said: I'm glad to see a nation with a telecoms regulator with teeth. Ofcom in the UK are pathetic, currently letting loose hundreds of thousands of "Ethernet over powerline" devices which ruin the shortwave spectrum for broadcast radio listeners and amateur users. They are in a quasi-agreement with BT to allow them to get away with pretty much any level of service at any price.

The radio spectrum is owned by the people, in the sense that it goes through every property in the nation (and abroad) so must be regulated at a national level. One exception is one too many.

However, confiscation seems OTT. Merely instruct the users not to turn on their devices during the trip. OTOH, as a ham radio licensee, I can get away with carrying around more kit through customs (I am not sure about Israel!) than other civilians because it's assumed I know the implications of using a transmitting device - in countries which believe in regulating potentially abusive or intrusive property in the hands of people who have not demonstrated a particular competence, I guess confiscation would be applied.
 
Comment

tbrinkma

macrumors 68000
Apr 24, 2006
1,651
93
According to the article:



So iPads may already be transmitting at lower power. However, I don't know the specifics, so I'm not sure what's going on. But excellent idea.

I'll take 'Out of Context Quotes' for $100, Alex.

The actual quote is:
"As the Israeli regulations in the area of WiFi are similar to European standards, which are different from American standards, which permit broadcasting at lower power, therefore the broadcast levels of the device prevent approving its use in Israel," said the officials.

It's about half of the article summary, but you only grabbed a misleading snippet. Israeli regulations are similar to European standards. American standards are different. European (and Israeli) standards only permit broadcasting at lower power levels. Therefore, the American versions of the iPad are *not* compliant with Israeli regulations.
 
Comment

Vmaatta

macrumors regular
Nov 11, 2007
111
0
but we support their war. a useless act of violence yet commuters into this nation are not allowed to bring a electronic device that has been approved around the globe?
It has been approved in the US and the US approval certainly doesn’t equate “around the globe”.
The US government has started trade wars with plenty of European countries over similar things -- like the EU requiring labeling of GMO food products led to 300% tariffs on all sorts of European imports from designer bags to Roquefort cheese. Considering we give Israel $3 billion a year in aid we damn well expect them not to block our goods.

They have laws. People who enter the country should obey those laws. I don't see the big deal. Leave your iPad at home or bring it and risk having it confiscated.

It's their country, not ours. I'm tired of people saying "well it's ok in the US" as if we are the standard. It's their own freaking country, let them control it and we can control ours.

I mean how would we like it if people came here breaking our laws who weren't citizens and then expecting us to make exceptions? (Oh wait, forgot about our southern neighbor :D)

You Americans seem to be pointing out the good stuff on your own so us Europeans don’t have much need to get involved :D.
 
Comment

Makosuke

macrumors 603
Aug 15, 2001
6,348
619
The Cool Part of CA, USA
Given the rather vast number of ignored wireless-spectrum devices in use in any country this seems a little draconian--face it, it takes about five minutes to make most consumer wireless routers break power output laws, and your chances of getting dinged for it, in any country, are next to nil unless you live right next door to someone technically proficient who hates you, and even then probably not.

Still, in general it's hardly unreasonable for a government to keep an eye on unlicensed wireless devices in their country. The US doesn't allow you to sell such until it's been okayed by the FCC--see the iPad's own application and acceptance--after all (though I'd bet good money the chance of getting something confiscated at customs is ZERO unless it's full of cocaine).

Unrelated, but it's not fair to give a hard time to who misunderstood this quote:
"As the Israeli regulations in the area of WiFi are similar to European standards, which are different from American standards, which permit broadcasting at lower power, therefore the broadcast levels of the device prevent approving its use in Israel,"
...as saying that the US allows LOWER power output than Europe and Israel, not higher, which is (I assume) what the reality is. The sentence is very hard to parse either way, and I first read it to mean that the US was stricter, not more lenient as well.

Unless, of course, Israel REQUIRES that devices output a higher power than the US allows, which I doubt is the case but would have the sentence making more sense.


Also, I'm mildly pleased that only about 30% of the comments in this thread are irrelevant pro/anti Israel stuff. Doesn't mean I don't have an opinion one way or the other, just that I understand those opinions and the reason for them are completely irrelevant to this discussion, so I keep them to myself. Props to others who do the same.
 
Comment

TalonFlyer

macrumors member
Apr 23, 2009
58
9
Just Plain Stupid

This is just plain stupid. A few iPads will have zero impact on the overall RF emissions within this tiny country. I suspect they don't understand the Apple product. One poster mentioned that power may be able to be reduced based on the devices location and that should be sufficient. I would also think that Apple knows how to comply with other countries regulations. What about the iPhone, iPods, Laptops, etc?

Lets not forget that the iPad already has issues with the case attenuating the WiFi a little. The few milliwatts of extra power only translates to a few feet of range. And the last time I was in Israel most of the homes were build out of concrete laced with rebar which significantly contains RF emissions.

I saw the picture of a MacBook that was shot three time by the Israelis. This just causes me to lose respect for the country and people. What type of mentality is at work here, Either allow or refuse entry to the country, they have that right. Anything else is just plain stupid and erodes the credibility of the entire country.
 
Comment

rstansby

macrumors 6502
Jun 19, 2007
493
0
I'll take 'Out of Context Quotes' for $100, Alex.

The actual quote is:


It's about half of the article summary, but you only grabbed a misleading snippet. Israeli regulations are similar to European standards. American standards are different. European (and Israeli) standards only permit broadcasting at lower power levels. Therefore, the American versions of the iPad are *not* compliant with Israeli regulations.

Well it isn't our fault that the sentence you quoted is ambiguous.
 
Comment

thejadedmonkey

macrumors G3
May 28, 2005
8,508
1,698
Pennsylvania
is there a stronger word in the English language than "asinine" to describe Israel's actions against the iPad. "Wi-Fi Power Output" levels? Really???

What is Israel's vendetta against Apple products, by the way? First, they obliterate an MBP. Now, they're Gitmo'ing iPads???

Could be that the OS X/iPod/iPhone/iPad doesn't support Israel's native language. I dunno, but that seems like a good reason to be pissed off.
 
Comment

indy1979

macrumors newbie
Apr 8, 2008
24
0
"As the Israeli regulations in the area of WiFi are similar to European standards, which are different from American standards, which permit broadcasting at lower power, therefore the broadcast levels of the device prevent approving its use in Israel,"

Let's break it apart...

"As the Israeli regulations in the area of WiFi are similar to European standards,

Ok, Israeli standards are similar to European standards.

which are different from American standards,

Israeli and European standards are different from American standards.

If this quote about American standards is removed, you get this

"As the Israeli regulations in the area of WiFi are similar to European standards, which permit broadcasting at lower power,

So that means that the iPad is transmitting at a greater power level than is permitted by Israeli and European standards.
 
Comment

jake4ever

macrumors regular
Jul 2, 2009
180
0
Ma'on La'oved, Hadera, Israel
Israel is right

First, Israel is right for banning something outside of their standards. Plus, it's not the United State's goods, it's technically China's. I'm glad to see my country defending it's standards. This has nothing to do with politics. It's simply that it doesn't work.
 
Comment

jbcaro

macrumors member
Mar 23, 2006
43
0
So when and if apple does create an iPad for use in Europe/Israel, how will it be differentiate from its US counterpart?

Or maybe Apple will put a configuration selector in it so the user can select if they are in US or Europe/Israel. Although I am not sure if current iPads can be made to do this via a software fix.
 
Comment

aristotle

macrumors 68000
Mar 13, 2007
1,768
5
Canada
Sorry but how would this affect tourists visiting with an iPad? What about the numerous other wifi devices that could be outputting more power brought into their country by tourists and even citizens?
 
Comment

2992

macrumors 6502
[...] (though I'd bet good money the chance of getting something confiscated at customs is ZERO unless it's full of cocaine).[...]
Once, few years ago, I had an apple (fruit) with me in my backpack when flying from Schiphol/Amsterdam to somewhere in the US. The US customs had confiscate the apple and asked me to pay a 100$ fee for not declaring it. Well, I have indeed forgot to write down on that paper about that apple as I have forgot that I haven't ate it during the flight.
Please, US guys, stop complaining and do not forgot where you are actually coming from and what kind of rules you have for your own good.
It's not convenient the way they are dealing with those iPads, but that's their rule, so, if you don't like it and don't want to obey it, don't go there. Seems the blue color doesn't fix everything afterall...
[...] like the EU requiring labeling of GMO food products [...]
That's a good thing. Stop selling unlabeled ****: it's good to know what we, the people, are buying & eating :cool:
 
Comment

Ori

macrumors 6502
Jun 18, 2008
346
2
Given the rather vast number of ignored wireless-spectrum devices in use in any country this seems a little draconian--face it, it takes about five minutes to make most consumer wireless routers break power output laws, and your chances of getting dinged for it, in any country, are next to nil unless you live right next door to someone technically proficient who hates you, and even then probably not.

Still, in general it's hardly unreasonable for a government to keep an eye on unlicensed wireless devices in their country. The US doesn't allow you to sell such until it's been okayed by the FCC--see the iPad's own application and acceptance--after all (though I'd bet good money the chance of getting something confiscated at customs is ZERO unless it's full of cocaine).

Unrelated, but it's not fair to give a hard time to who misunderstood this quote:
...as saying that the US allows LOWER power output than Europe and Israel, not higher, which is (I assume) what the reality is. The sentence is very hard to parse either way, and I first read it to mean that the US was stricter, not more lenient as well.

Unless, of course, Israel REQUIRES that devices output a higher power than the US allows, which I doubt is the case but would have the sentence making more sense.


Also, I'm mildly pleased that only about 30% of the comments in this thread are irrelevant pro/anti Israel stuff. Doesn't mean I don't have an opinion one way or the other, just that I understand those opinions and the reason for them are completely irrelevant to this discussion, so I keep them to myself. Props to others who do the same.

Its a small densely populated country which relies heavily on communications for its security. If the ipad gets popular in Israel and has even the smallest chance of interfering with that then they have every right to stop it coming in until it meets their regulations.

Try bringing something into the US that breaks US laws but may be legal elsewhere and see what happens.
 
Comment

kranzler

macrumors newbie
Apr 15, 2010
1
0
Israel

I just came back from Israel with my MBP (of course, no problems...).

Israel has/had a large black market for Apple products, and it wouldn't surprise me if this was an effort at a stopgap measure. I'm sure Apple (or the authorized Apple reseller) could have put some pressure on the communications ministry to help.

It is likely that many of those iPads were destined for resale. But yes, thats pretty draconian...
 
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