Issue with link band may have caused nerve problems in wrist

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by Gmouse, Aug 27, 2016.

  1. Gmouse macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Location:
    Lakewood, CO
    #1
    I have the Space Black watch with the link band, and have been wearing it on my left wrist, as I have worn all watches since I started wearing a watch. About three months ago I started getting a sharp nerve pain whenever I reached out with my left hand and grabbed something.

    Went to see my primary care Dr., and she thought that it was de quervain syndrome, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Quervain_syndrome , and she sent me to a hand specialist.

    The specialist felt that it was the watch band causing the issue as it was pressing on a nerve running on one of my arm bones, and didn't think it was de quervain, as the pain didn't go all the way up to my elbow, it stopped around my wrist. He suggested I quit wearing the watch on that hand, and give it six weeks, to see if it went away.

    I bought a black sport band, and started wearing my watch on my right hand. Man, oh man...I never realized what a change that was...for whatever reason it now seems like I am continually banging my watch into things when I move my arm, and I have to force myself to look at my right, not left wrist.

    Question I have, is just how loose can I have the link band...as I'd like to resume wearing the watch on my left wrist, with the link band not the sport band, as it just looks a lot better.

    I had it pretty loose, and could rotate the watch around my wrist with no issues. When I exercised (some gym work or walking 1-6 miles) I would get sweaty and the watch would slide up and down my wrist as I moved my arm, but the heartbeat reading seemed like it was working fine. I had thought that it was plenty loose, and, since I have been wearing watches, they've all had link bands of one type or another, and I wore them with about the same looseness.

    For the sport band, I have it loose enough to slide my watch around my wrist, and it will slide up and down my arm when I get sweaty, but, again, the heartbeat monitor seems to still be working OK.

    It's been four weeks since I moved the watch over, and, I've not noticed any lessening of the nerve pain. The hand specialist said if it hasn't gone away by six weeks, he'd give me a steroid injection that should relieve the pain and help to reduce the inflammation.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Relentless Power macrumors G5

    Relentless Power

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    #2
    This is really difficult to answer. Only you can decide how loose the link band is for comfort. My opinion, stop wearing the link band all together if it's causing a medical condition. If the situation improves, then re-evaluate from their.
     
  3. Newtons Apple Suspended

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #3
    I prefer to have mine loose enough where they can slip over the wrist bone. I had to have surgery on my wrist for the long term damage by a solid gold Rolex Yacht Master. I hardly ever wear the Rolex anymore and my daily user is now a Fitbit Charge HR. I can wear it very loose and it tract my HR just fine.
     
  4. fischersd macrumors 68040

    fischersd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Location:
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    #4
    ^^^This. You said that you had the link pretty loose - it could move up and down your arm and you could easily rotate it around your wrist. This suggests that the watch wasn't tight enough to be causing nerve trauma.
    Sorry, we have a couple of doctors in the family (no, I'm not one of them), but we've debated enough (and they've shared enough about the medical industry - both sides of the border) to know that not only are they not infallible, but many of them don't possess advanced analytical abilities...they're just book smart.
    To me, it sounds like this specialist took the easy answer (do this and come back and see me in six weeks). The watch could be an easy culprit...as otherwise his diagnosis is likely to get a lot more complicated and require a lot more testing.

    That he's talking about giving you a steroid injection to mask the problem? Sorry...I'd be going back to my GP and asking for a referral to a different specialist. One that may actually want to diagnose what's going on with your arm.
     
  5. Freida macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    #5
    Please don't take steroids etc. That will only mess you up. I have RSI and even though its not the same the approach will be similar. Regular exercise, proper posture (even when sitting) streching a lot, good diet and physio all helps and kinda gets rid off it. No chemicals (I repeat) NO CHEMICALS will miraculously heal you. Asses your lifestyle (as I did too) and do changes that are necessary to get better. Do NOT take steroids to mask the problem as the other person mentioned. Please be wise!
     
  6. Thai macrumors 6502a

    Thai

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    #6
    Remember, his hand specialist is recommending him to WAIT and see before he would consider steroid INJECTION.

    Steroid injection into wrist nerve is NOT like taking steroids by mouth...and does NOT carry with it the extent of steroid side effects commonly associated with oral steroids.

    If a nerve is traumatized by something acutely, then an injection may improve quality of life while it heals. Sure, you can see many specialists to perform thousands of dollars of tests...to come to same conclusion.

    As always, Internet is not a place to give medical advice to random strangers...certainly not so strong recommendations to go against OP's doctor.
     
  7. fischersd macrumors 68040

    fischersd

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2014
    Location:
    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
    #7
    It's quite likely a repetitive stress injury (as his primary care physician suggested). Masking such an injury without making any modifications in the originating behaviour is somewhat pointless. While the steroid shot may provide temporarily relief from the pain, the trauma could continue and actually worsen as the root cause hasn't been identified or alleviated.

    But, yes, we're playing "armchair quarterback" here. The OP did ask for opinions. :)
     
  8. Freida macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    #8
    Well, here is the difference. I'm in europe and here the healthcare is free!!!!
    I know that for healthcare alone USA sucks big time (my ex had to leave US as her son was born with some medical issues and the system in USA would make her a homeless person so she went back to UK where all that was done for free!!!)
    Back on topic - I'm not giving medical advice! I'm simply stating that he should not be taking steroids before trying to fix things that may cause it in the first place. (bad eating habits, not enough exercise etc.)
    And before you crucify me for not supporting the new american "dream" (popping pills for every single thing) try to think how much balanced and healthy nutrition, enough exercise etc. can reverse many MANY health issues. YES, its not the answer to every single thing but its the best START and in many case the only thing you need to do.

    We can go into the discussion how the pharmaceutical companies want you to be their customer but that would be lengthy and pointless exercise here. All I'm simply stating is to go for the natural and LOGICAL thing first and then re-evaluate the situation. Society these days (more so in USA) got used to a common theme - swallow few pills in the morning and then do and eat whatever you do without any regards to your body & mind. That is simply wrong!

    I've gone through it (both ways) and I realised that if I eat well and treat my body with respect, I get a lot in return. When I was on pills my medical situation only got worse, NOT better!
    Anyway, it was my suggestion to OP not to go for the "quick fix" but to go for the long term solution! Healthy lifestyle ALWAYS wins in the long run regardless how much the pharmaceutic companies want us to believe something else.
     
  9. FrisbeeK9 macrumors 6502a

    FrisbeeK9

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    #9
    Patient: "Doc, it hurts when I play the violin. "
    Doctor:" then stop playing the violin"

    So I think trying on the other hand maybe is a good idea. Not a doctor either. And I couldn't resist telling a very old joke.
     
  10. Thai, Aug 27, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2016

    Thai macrumors 6502a

    Thai

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    #10
    Not even sure where to begin...oh yeah UK healthcare so darn good...that's a good one!! LOL Your ex is mis-informed.

    UK healthcare is FREE? What is your tax rate again? Where's the money coming from to pay for these "free" stuff?

    What is the wait time over there to even see a family doctor? Wait time for a specialist?

    Regarding OP, isn't that what the hand Doctor is suggesting? Wait and see. I am sure the doctor advised OP on how to avoid aggravating the nerve.

    I love natural folks...damn the medical community and then when crap hits the fan, they come running in and pushing others to the side demanding a quick fix to a boiling chronic medical problem.

    Let's keep the generalization to a minimum here.
     
  11. Freida macrumors 65816

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    Oct 22, 2010
    #11
    You always do what doctor tells you?
     
  12. Thai macrumors 6502a

    Thai

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    #12
    IF that doctor makes sense, then yes. If he/she explains his reasoning, then yes. Having borderline knowledge about something does not make you an expert in medical field.

    You never answered me...you clearly think that your healthcare system is better...and how everything is FREE. What is your tax rate? What is your wait time to see your doctor? I know your system well enough to already know the answer...but I wanna see you write it! :D

    Your advise is foolish because you have no idea the OP's medical condition, his exam, and any testing that was done. Your medical knowledge is based on knowing someone who knows someone's neighbor who once read a medical pamphlet 50 years ago. In other words, your medical knowledge is non-existent yet here you are advising someone to go against his doctor. That's irresponsible IMHO.
     
  13. Freida macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    #13
    You are right, my medical knowledge is minimal YET I still prefer to find alternative and natural treatment/way to a problem then the chemical one.

    Rest of your questions? You picked up the weaknesses so I don't have to answer as you know you have a point there but lets just say this - I would rather wait for something (wait time is only in non urgent cases) then to pay US prices for medical care! Ask anyone in europe what they think about US health care system and I'm sure you get very unified answer. Regardless, you are right about the weaknesses but when it comes to it, free is free :D
     
  14. Thai macrumors 6502a

    Thai

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    #14
    Great...you like alternative medicine and "natural" ways...just don't wait too long to ask for medical assistance. You did not even know difference b/w steroid injection vs. oral!!

    Dude, it is NOT free. "Free is free"?? Huh?!

    And no, the wait time even in urgent (non-life threatening) is very long. A friend of mine had repeated rectal bleeding...still alive...had to wait 6-8 months to see GI doctor to get a simple scope.

    If you don't know yet, NOTHING IN LIFE IS FREE.

    In USA, hospitals canNOT turn anyone away with an acute illness of significant degree...regardless of insurance.

    BTW, some of your countrymen come to USA for the best medical care when crap hits the fan. Yet, it is USA that has the latest breakthrough medications for the worst conditions. It is USA that has #1 (and #2) cancer center in the world.

    Yeah, trust me, no one is envious of your healthcare system. Certainly, not me as a tax payer.
     
  15. Freida macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    #15
    Really? Where did I say that I don't know the difference? I do know the difference so I don't know which response gave you the idea that I don't.

    Free in terms of the fact that you dont' have to sell your house to pay for medical bills. Come on, don't be word anal here
     
  16. Thai macrumors 6502a

    Thai

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2016
    Location:
    Colorado
    #16
    Ok...you know the difference...if you say so...hint: read your initial response again. LOL

    Again, your ex either misunderstood things or she was lying to you. Her kid (and pretty every kid in USA not under private insurance) had Medicaid at the very least...which would have paid for all necessary procedures/meds for her kid.

    And in YOUR healthcare, there is a limit to how far you can get treated before your treatment gets denied. It is NOT free because everyone pays for it...and they pay a lot!! You seem to think that it is free...so, you're either a freeloader or young and have no understanding of where the money comes from.
     
  17. Freida macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    #17
    I love the tons of assumption you made about me whilst I made none about you.
    So I'm gonna leave you to it as I really don't feel it will progress any further with you. So lets agree to disagree and move on. Thank you very much
     
  18. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Location:
    L.A. (Lower Alabama)
    #18
    Years ago, my mother suffered from De Quervain syndrome. It made her life a nightmare, and was well before "repetitive stress disorder" had been invented.

    Sometimes these things happen, simply due to what you do and how you do it, with no relationship to external sources - like watch bands.

    I would go for the steroid injection. Why live in pain when it's unnecessary?
     

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