iPad Keep iPad charging to save battery cycle

IcedT1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 6, 2016
18
2
Can I keep my iPad plugged when fully charged? Does it draw power from outlet when full charged just like MacBook to save battery cycle? Or does it draw power from battery while charging at the same time?
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,218
1,584
Won’t work. iOS will ‘maintain’ the battery so it’ll get to 100% then drain a bit then charge again. It’s actually better to cycle the battery for longevity
 

IcedT1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 6, 2016
18
2
To understand you better, when fully charged, does it draw power from outlet just like macbook or does it drain the battery and charge at the same time? If it works just like MacBook I believe it will save battery cycle long term.
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,218
1,584
It stops charging completely and drains the battery. The battery does not like this and doing it long term will cause more wear than cycling.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,764
14,918
Jacksonville, Florida
While charging the battery is used when the device is turned on. The charger circuitry will only work when the device calls for power by dropping below a certain charge. While you will be saving cycles you are missing the best part of the iPad, it is portable!

Do as you wish but I would occasionally use it without being plugged in just to keep some fresh electrons moving. You batteries will last over three years and then you can get them replaced if you still want to use a three years old iPad.
 

IcedT1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 6, 2016
18
2
While charging the battery is used when the device is turned on. The charger circuitry will only work when the device calls for power by dropping below a certain charge. While you will be saving cycles you are missing the best part of the iPad, it is portable!

Do as you wish but I would occasionally use it without being plugged in just to keep some fresh electrons moving. You batteries will last over three years and then you can get them replaced if you still want to use a three years old iPad.
I see. So in a way it works like MacBook which only draws power from outlet when charging/fully charged?
While i ageee with youthat iPad is portable, I can use it in bed and the same can be useful for my iPhone since it retains only half as many cycles as iPad.
 

SportsPhan8

macrumors member
Apr 29, 2016
38
6
Won’t work. iOS will ‘maintain’ the battery so it’ll get to 100% then drain a bit then charge again. It’s actually better to cycle the battery for longevity
What does cycling the battery mean?
 

JPack

macrumors 601
Mar 27, 2017
4,672
6,995
Keeping your battery at 100% is poor for battery health. Li-ion cells don't like being at either extremes 0% or 100%.

You're better off cycling the battery than keeping it at 100%. You see a lot of notebook computer batteries fail because the user keeps it plugged in all the time.
 

gnasher729

macrumors P6
Nov 25, 2005
16,504
3,097
Interesting opinions here. I would recommend to leave the iPad on the charger when you can use it that way without inconvenience, using it without charger until the battery is close to empty once a month, and apart from that not worry about it.
 

IcedT1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 6, 2016
18
2
I understand. In fact I occasionally discharge my MacBook just to keep the electrons moving. I think my question is does it draw power from outlet once it’s fully charged? That way it could save a hella of batterycycle when I’m in bed since I can use it like my MacBook.
Keeping your battery at 100% is poor for battery health. Li-ion cells don't like being at either extremes 0% or 100%.

You're better off cycling the battery than keeping it at 100%. You see a lot of notebook computer batteries fail because the user keeps it plugged in all the time.
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[doublepost=1511506757][/doublepost]
Interesting opinions here. I would recommend to leave the iPad on the charger when you can use it that way without inconvenience, using it without charger until the battery is close to empty once a month, and apart from that not worry about it.
Yeah. I have looked through several forums and I have been getting mixed opinion. Keeping it plugged temporarily won’t hurt the battery that’s for sure, but I want to know if it draws power from outlet while charging or draws from battery and charging at the same time. I think I would be doing the same to my iPhone to maximize my battery cycle. (Too poor to change battery yearly)
 
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Summer Rain

macrumors newbie
Jul 14, 2015
2
0
Keeping your battery at 100% is poor for battery health. Li-ion cells don't like being at either extremes 0% or 100%.

You're better off cycling the battery than keeping it at 100%. You see a lot of notebook computer batteries fail because the user keeps it plugged in all the time.
There is nothing on the Apple website under the section ‘batteries’ that say this is true... a cycle is 100% of the battery no matter how you charge it. Use 75% of 100% one day and 25% the next equaling one charge. It doesn’t matter how you do it or what percentage you choose to charge it at... 100% will always be a cycle no matter how you choose to do it. There’s no degradation in a certain way.
 

JPack

macrumors 601
Mar 27, 2017
4,672
6,995
There is nothing on the Apple website under the section ‘batteries’ that say this is true... a cycle is 100% of the battery no matter how you charge it. Use 75% of 100% one day and 25% the next equaling one charge. It doesn’t matter how you do it or what percentage you choose to charge it at... 100% will always be a cycle no matter how you choose to do it. There’s no degradation in a certain way.
Apple is not behind the li-ion battery science. Their concern is user experience and selling new phones every year, not longevity.

Guys like Tesla are doing the ground level research. Based on Tesla and many other battery researchers, charging to 100% is not good for li-ion.
 

Summer Rain

macrumors newbie
Jul 14, 2015
2
0
Apple is not behind the li-ion battery science. Their concern is user experience and selling new phones every year, not longevity.

Guys like Tesla are doing the ground level research. Based on Tesla and many other battery researchers, charging to 100% is not good for li-ion.
Why is it not good to charge it to 100%? Surely Apple would prevent that happening (stop it charging at 90% etc) so it would prolong the life of it?
 

JPack

macrumors 601
Mar 27, 2017
4,672
6,995
Why is it not good to charge it to 100%? Surely Apple would prevent that happening (stop it charging at 90% etc) so it would prolong the life of it?
You seem to think Apple is your grandmother. Their job isn't to protect you at every turn or ensure your device lasts as long as possible. Tim Cook's compensation depends on the annual revenue and profit performance of the company.

When you perform a saturation charge to 100%, the cell voltage becomes very high which increases the likelihood of unwanted side reactions known as solid electrolyte interphases. Think of it as a layer of "dirt" on the electrodes which reduces charge capacity. The higher the charge, the further away the electrodes are from their thermodynamic equilibrium and the electrodes are at their most reactive state. It will even slowly react with the electrolyte. The chemical reactions are not perfectly reversible which is why batteries degrade in the first place. In layman's terms, a saturation charge stresses the battery much more so than an 80% charge.

Apple needs a long runtime to fulfill user and marketing requirements. They could sell the iPhone with a 10 hour battery life browsing the Internet based on 500 charge cycles. Or they could advertise an 8 hour battery life based on 1,000 charge cycles. Guess which one most companies prefer to advertise?
 

Neodym

macrumors 68000
Jul 5, 2002
1,927
510
My iPhone 7+ is often run off the charger during work, while streaming music. That way, it is at 100% for long periods. Battery health: 100%.

My wife‘s iPhone 6 (non-plus) is usually doing fast charging using the 12W-iPad charger, since the beginning. Battery health: 97%.

Besides, I think I once read an article about Apple showing 100% charge, but will in fact only charge up to safe levels of some 85% or 90% (can’t remember the exact number). Same for the lower levels: When an iDevice shows 0%, it has in fact some 20% left, in order to make sure it doesn’t come down to potentially harmful battery levels.
 

themaestro

macrumors member
Jun 10, 2019
54
7
Ireland
Using iMazing to check my 1st generation iPad Pro 12.9 is reading 99% and 184 cycles. I don't play games. Using ForScore, Facebook, Twitter, gmail etc.
 

Supercookiemonster

macrumors newbie
Apr 2, 2019
14
3
While charging the battery is used when the device is turned on. The charger circuitry will only work when the device calls for power by dropping below a certain charge. While you will be saving cycles you are missing the best part of the iPad, it is portable!

Do as you wish but I would occasionally use it without being plugged in just to keep some fresh electrons moving. You batteries will last over three years and then you can get them replaced if you still want to use a three years old iPad.
You can get the battery replaced after 3 years?