Keylogger

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Delighted, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. Delighted macrumors 6502

    Delighted

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    Feb 25, 2012
    #1
    Can someone install a keylogger onto a mbp without your password? Just curious.
     
  2. Intell, Mar 1, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2012

    Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #2
    Yes, but psychical access to the machine is needed for about 5-15 minutes and the person would have to be very well versed in Mac OS X to do it.
     
  3. Delighted thread starter macrumors 6502

    Delighted

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    #3
    TY Intell. Good to know.

    ----------

    They probably also need a USB with the keylogger on it(i'm assuming).
     
  4. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #4
    One thing you can do to make it harder, but not impossible, is to use an firmware password on your Mac and keep Mac OS X and other software on it up to date.
     
  5. Delighted thread starter macrumors 6502

    Delighted

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    #5
    how do I do a firmware password? This is getting interesting.
     
  6. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #7
    Why did you feel the need to revive a two year old thread?
     
  7. simsaladimbamba

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    located
    #8
    I am interested in keyloggers, thus I found the threads from 2012 I revived due to me being interested in keyloggers, therefore ... . It is like Catcher In The Rye books for that Fletcher dude in CT.
     
  8. jknight8907 macrumors 6502a

    jknight8907

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    #9
    So you revived it just to parrot what had already been said 2 posts before your new one? :confused:
     
  9. caseycicada macrumors member

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    #10
    That's exactly what he did. Let's keep it going.
     
  10. simsaladimbamba

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    #11
    Yes, I had to revive it. Sometimes it is necessary for me to survive. Do you get that?
     
  11. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #12
    Personally, I'd like to have a key logger on one of my Macs. Just in case I ever need to monitor a soon-to-be teenager.
     
  12. TechGod macrumors 68040

    TechGod

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    #13
    You could just look at their history like my dad used to do. Now my dad trusts me enough with my own laptop.
     
  13. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #14
    Actually, I'd rather just have a blinking icon at the top that says "Dad Surveillance Program Operating". It's more the knowledge that I can do it then actually doing it.

    When I was a kid we had a kid's telephone line in our house. My father had an extension of it in his den. We were sure that he listened in to all of our calls. It wasn't until many years later we found out that extension had never been wired. It was just a phone on his desk not plugged into anything.
     
  14. TechGod macrumors 68040

    TechGod

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    #15
    That's a good idea actually. But as I mentioned previously, my dad used to check my history every evening after coming from work. Now he just trusts me and knows I won't do anything wrong.

    having this trust makes me want to NOT break his trust and possibly is a better way than intimidating the child perhaps? What do I know? I'm just a kid atm;)
     
  15. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #16
    A friend of mine gave his teenage daughter a car but on the bumper he put two bumper stickers... The first: "If you see this car out after midnight call XXX-XXXX". The second said, "How's my driving? Call my dad at XXX-XXXX". She must not have hated them too much because she's in her mid-twenties now and the stickers are still on the car.

    I have Remote Desktop and can look at my 11-year-old daughter's MacBook if I want to but I've only done it once or twice to fix something for her. My former step-daughter who was a teenager was a different story. A couple times, I had to review her actions especially after discovering her second Facebook account.
     
  16. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #17

    THen you look at their browser cache or Flash temp files/local storage.
     
  17. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #18
    I have my kids computers in a public space - not their rooms, so I see all the time they're on. I also use openDNS which I've locked out certain types of sites - being at the DNS level there's no getting around that on my home network.

    Its not a perfect solution but my kids also know I'm very involved and over see what they're on. They're young, so its more with protecting them from predators and/or inappropriate stuff that they shouldn't be exposed too.
     
  18. SandboxGeneral Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #19
    Does the Open DNS service you use cost anything?
     
  19. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #20
    They offer a free service but they also provide a more robust service that does cost money. Since I just need basic parental filtering I've opted for the free service.
     
  20. TechGod macrumors 68040

    TechGod

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    #21
    I was never that smart at 10 years old. All I knew is that I could play online games and watch YouTube on my laptop lol.

    But of course exposure to tech has increased and the 10 year olds of today probably do know how to delete history.

    ----------

    I just think its different ways of parenting really. I certainly don't believe any parents method is invalid since they know their kids the best I was just simply sharing a story on how my dad used to treat me with my laptop.
     
  21. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #22
    These kids are smarter than you think these days. My daughter's school blocks Facebook and other social media sites on the classroom computers. Fifth grade kids were using proxies to still go on Facebook. Those are 10 - 12 year olds defeating the IT professionals.
     
  22. TechGod macrumors 68040

    TechGod

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    #23
    I could probably do that now but at 10 years old? I didn't know anything WiFi or anything like that.

    That's genuinely shocking to me.
     
  23. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #24
    I'm sure that they learned how to do it from their high school siblings. However, the odd thing is that they block Facebook and other social media sites from the classroom computers but the kids have iPads and they have the Facebook apps on them. Not exactly consistent.
     
  24. caseycicada macrumors member

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    May 27, 2014
    #25
    I'm just going to butt in here- my step brother (just finished 6th grade) told me that he has a typing class, where the teacher (of 25 years) was adamant about never using the backspace key. I found this alarming, because it means she was still teaching typewriter technique. We have a backspace for a reason: to delete for mistakes.
    Along the same lines, calculators are forbidden in the classroom, because you will not be able to use them in the real world. Trust me, my employer would much rather me use a calculator than pencil and paper. It's faster, and more accurate.
    Absolutely NO use of phones or electronic devices. I use my phone as a tool for effective communication constantly at work. And yes, I text my friends/family, and no, my boss doesn't care. He does it too.
    No wikipedia. If I need to learn about something, guess where I go to read about it?
    Learn theory in school. At work, I learn applications, and my company's methods (which are nowhere close to what I learned in school.)

    I have a few complaints about the 16 years I spent in school. I graduated college two years ago, and I have barely used any of the information I learned there. Of all the information pumped into my head, I'm going to estimate I've used 2.5%.

    No more.
     

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