kitchen sink garbage disposal .....

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by quovadis, Oct 28, 2007.

  1. quovadis macrumors regular

    quovadis

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    in PA
    #1
    is it OK to drop used tea leaves and used coffee grinds down the disposal?:eek:

    Live in a rented apt and don't want to mess up the disposal
     
  2. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

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  3. iRachel macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    stuff that's already ground (like coffee) or is easily chopped up (the tea leaves) should be fine. What you don't want to do is drop really solid stuff (like chicken bones) in there unless you have one of those fancy disposals that's specifically designed to deal with solid waste.
     
  4. d_and_n5000 macrumors 6502a

    d_and_n5000

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    Oct 6, 2005
    #4
    Corn husks are to be avoided as well - my grandma learned that the hard way :eek: Put them down the disposal, and the silk got caught 18 feet down the pipe, had to call up a plumber. Not fun in the least.
     
  5. iRachel macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Yeah, the chicken bone example I gave is similar... during college, some friends of mine threw some in the disposal at their apartment, and it got all jammed up. By the time the landlord came to fix it three days later, he had to completely disassemble the sink and the unit to get the mess out, and the whole apartment ended up reeking of rotting chicken bones for a week. :eek:
     
  6. wickedpapercut macrumors member

    wickedpapercut

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    Jul 17, 2005
    #6
    Just remember to run lots and lots of water to flush stuff down the disposer. Especially important if you're grinding up any starchy stuff -- potato peels, rice, breakfast cereal, etc.
     
  7. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

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    CT
    #7
    If the disposal gets a little funky smelling cut some lemons and throw them down.
     
  8. quovadis thread starter macrumors regular

    quovadis

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    Oct 30, 2006
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    in PA
    #8
    Thanks for all the great advice guys! Really appreciate it:)
     
  9. Evangelion macrumors 68040

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    Jan 10, 2005
    #9
    Um, you mean throwing the stuff down the drain? Why? Doesn't that make cleaning the water that much more difficult? How about recycling that waste instead?
     
  10. johneaston macrumors regular

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    Dec 28, 2010
    #10
    Are waste disposals quite widespread in America?

    I've never come across one in England but have noticed some TV and magazine ads for an "Insinkerator". It looks like an awful idea! Stuffing tea bags and potato peelings down the plug hole. Seems easier to put it in the bin, the recycling, the compost, or just feed it to the chickens.
     
  11. stonyc macrumors 65816

    stonyc

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    Feb 15, 2005
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    Michigan
    #11
    Un-popped popcorn kernles are a big no-no too.

    Olive pits as well.

    :)
     
  12. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

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    Mar 17, 2005
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    London, England
    #12
    YES! And Christ on a bike do I freakin' miss them. Needing to scrape food stuffs off my plate into the bin is BS. British... savages! :p

    I talked my in-laws into getting one installed (which caused much hilarity to the guy who was unfamiliar with them) when they renovated their kitchen. They love it. I need to get one installed.
     
  13. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #13
    The purpose of a disposal is to grind up small bits of stuff that happen to make their way into the sink via dirty dishes, pots and pans, etc.

    If you have to take coffee grounds out of the coffee maker and put them somewhere, it's best (for the sake of your disposal and your plumbing) to put them into the trash instead.

    I never understood why people (thinking about Mrs. Tomorrow and many others) go out of their way to put something into the sink to dispose of it when it's just as easy to put it into a trash can. :confused:

    I don't know how things are in your part of the world, but here we don't have recycling facilities for cookie crumbs, egg shells, or small bits of pasta. So we rinse our plates into the sink and let the disposal take care of it.
     
  14. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #14
    I had one in my house in the South East (of the UK, in case there is any doubt ;) ) and that place was built in 1989. It failed about 10 years later and the cost of replacement was too much so I removed it. They are handy for rushed households.
     
  15. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #15
    Coffee grounds tend to clean a drain, tea leaves tend to clog it.
     
  16. KnightWRX macrumors Pentium

    KnightWRX

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    #16
    You don't have composting ? :confused:

    Gee, what remote and backward part of the world do you live in ? Composting has been around for literally ages.
     
  17. wpotere Guest

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    Oct 7, 2010
    #17
    As an American that has lived abroad for many years, I miss that about Europe. We stuff everything down the garbage disposal and into the trash rather than recycle. When I lived in Germany we had a bin specifically for Bio as well recycle for paper, plastic and glass. I can't believe how behind we are here in the USA when if comes to recycling.
     
  18. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #18
    So you want me to throw this stuff into my backyard and let it rot there? :eek:

    What do I do with it then? Let it...rot...even more? I don't have any use for it, I don't want to smell it, and I'd rather not have the vermin it attracts.
     
  19. wpotere Guest

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    Oct 7, 2010
    #19

    You don't have flower beds or a garden? Composting is a great way to get free nutrient rich stuff for your beds. As for the vermin, you don't put it against your house, you put it as far out as you can and it really doesn't openly smell if done right.
     
  20. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #20
    No, as a matter of fact, I don't. And I don't want any. More work than it's worth.

    Okay, so I set it out against the back fence, which is all of 30' or so from the house. Then not only do I get to smell it, but several of my neighbors do, too. The raccoons, opossums, armadillos, skunks, etc. that it attracts would be everywhere. And at the end of it all, I don't even have a use for it. No thank you.
     
  21. wpotere Guest

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    Oct 7, 2010
    #21
    Then in this case, the bio bin is the way to go. In Germany I had a small yard at one place and was given a bio bin. This was where we dumped out greens etc... "no meat or bones" which was picked up by the city and taken to a city compost heap. Then, you could go there for free to get some if you needed it. I was never a "green" person until I saw how easy it was while living in Germany and now know that most of it is just us being lazy or the misconception that it is difficult and smelly.
     
  22. xUKHCx Administrator emeritus

    xUKHCx

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    #22
    Where I live you can put meat and bones in there too :)

    Our waste is taken here to be converted into compost.
     
  23. KnightWRX macrumors Pentium

    KnightWRX

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    Quebec, Canada
    #23
    Hum... no. Most cities in the civilized world gives you a bin for biological waste and they will do the composting themselves and sell it to farms that need the compost (or firms that will make residential compost for people with home gardens/flower beds).

    Wow, you do live in a backwards place. You can't even figure this simple concept out. I guess you also think recycling needs to be done in your backyard where you will turn used paper into blank sheets of paper by chewing on the old paper to turn it into paste and roll it using a rolling pin ? :rolleyes:

    Burn your leaves/grass much ?
     
  24. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    #24
    well coffee grounds you could just toss on the ground since it is so much like dirt any way and if you have a garden you could just toss them out there. It would break down pretty quickly and give good nutrients to the planets.

    As for putting them down the garbage disposal generally not the best idea.
    I personally will take my reusable filter dump it out in the trash then rinse out the rest in the sink.
    Reason I use a reusable filter is because it is just easier to make sure it always works. No paper to fold over or get screwed up. It is not for cost savings or environmental reasons as filters are dirt and I mean dirt cheap like 2 bucks for 1k worth of them.
     
  25. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    Oct 9, 2006
    #25
    umm I think you are thinking of CA. Most cities in the US do not do that. We have recycling bins and trash cans and that is it.
     

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