Late 2008 Macbook Pro Overclock [ UPDATED ]

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by lscangus, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. lscangus macrumors 6502

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    #1
    Updated story

    2.8 CTO MBP Later 2008, Overclocked to 3.25Ghz but i found out that the CPU actually throttles back, so basically it is overheated, so i decided to run a Test without overclocking, and it appears to me the MBP actually overheat without overclocking. So please Users, please post your idle temp of your CPU and do a test with prime95 and CoreTemp, so see whether your MBP actually throttles, if it does, then the thermal system on your MBP has a little bit of problem like mine does.

    My MBP CPU temp can reach 107'C in MacOSX.

    Angus
     
  2. Essjay macrumors regular

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    #2
    Temps?
     
  3. thechidz macrumors 68000

    thechidz

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    #3
    what do you mean by screams exactly? hd video encoding times?
     
  4. fleshman03 macrumors 68000

    fleshman03

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    #4
    It literally screams from the burns it's acquiring. :D
     
  5. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    Oct 24, 2007
    #5
    Use rivatuner to overclock the GPU.

    CPU and GPU are controlled by OS X. Overclocking really has never been a serious offering in the mac world due to lack of interchangable parts or general need :(
     
  6. J the Ninja macrumors 68000

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    Jul 14, 2008
    #6
    1. Pics or it didn't happen.

    2. Temps?

    3. What clock settings? Are you using 310Mhz x 10.5, or something else?
     
  7. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #7
    CoreTemp, CPU-Z, and HWMonitor pics NOW.
     
  8. LoneWolf121188 macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    ^^ A 425MHz OC on a Core 2? If it were a desktop chip, I'd consider that modest. It being a mobile chip, I'll believe it.

    I beg to differ. A modest 10% OC could reduce rendering time for a scene from 10 hours to 9 hours in FCP. That's huge. It's never been a serious offering because nobody has bothered to write an app to do it. Generally speaking, the people who write those apps are gamers, and since OS X is not the OS of choice for gamers, no one will take the time to figure out how to write an OS X OCing app.
     
  9. G4DP macrumors 65816

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    Mar 28, 2007
    #9
    I've OC'd my Mac Pro from 2.8Ghz to 3.25Ghz. Using the tool from ZDnet.

    Does work trying to find a tool to prove it, but there isn't CPU speed checker for Mac that I can easily find.
     
  10. andiwm2003 macrumors 601

    andiwm2003

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    #10
    at 3.25GHz it's a 16% increase in speed assuming the increase in GHz fully translates in real world speed.

    16% difference can hardly be called "it screams".

    In real life you won't notice that difference for the most part because memory, GPU, HD are the same.

    in transcoding it means a 1 hr task is done at best in 52 min.

    all in all not worth the trouble unless you're transcoding/rendering for money. but then you would invest money in a octocore mac pro and overclock that.
     
  11. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

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    Oct 24, 2007
    #11

    ???

    That's what I said. Gaming has always been the main catalyst for enhancing performance and most FCP users won't know how to code or general GPU programming anyway.

    I personally would overclock my machine for After Effects work but it's not that big of a deal (yet).
     
  12. J the Ninja macrumors 68000

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    #12
    Meh, IMO, a big part of overclocking is just the fun of seeing how far you can push it. It really doesn't make that big of a speed difference, but it is definitely fun to do.
     
  13. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #13
    Not to mention overclocking my 3850 to 770 MHz core means faster folding. :D
     
  14. fleshman03 macrumors 68000

    fleshman03

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    #14
    YaY cure for cancer and/or finding ET. Both would be awesome.
    /useless post.
     
  15. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #15
    I use my computer to heat my room. Why not? :rolleyes:
     
  16. fleshman03 macrumors 68000

    fleshman03

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    #16

    And going green! Nice.

    Am I slow or am I the only one who thinks doing this on a mobile platform (with the different CPU and smaller casing) kind of a big deal. Wouldn't it get crazy hot?
     
  17. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #17
    It's a very big deal given the form factor of the MacBook Pro and the chipset, GPU, and GPU being on the same heatpipe.

    If it's a big computer or even the iMac it's a little less risky. I remember pushing my Mobility X1600 on the iMac to the stock 470/470 MHz and beyond over in Windows.
     
  18. mustang_dvs macrumors 6502a

    mustang_dvs

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    #18
    Sure, the MBP will run at 3.25GHz, but for how long? 5 mins? 10?
     
  19. lscangus thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #19
    Screenshot.

    But i notice one thing during a stress test, the CPU jump to a 6X multiplier instead of 10.5X for 0.1 seconds, at a rhythm. This happens even when it is not overclocked. I wonder if it is the driver problem or it is my MBP defect.

    Angus
     

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  20. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #20
    Sounds like the CPU throttling itself to survive. That happens around 80-90 C on Intel processors and it depends on the model as well.

    What are the load temperatures under stock speeds? How are the fans holding up?
     
  21. Essjay macrumors regular

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    Jul 12, 2008
    #21
    90 C is hot for a mobile chip but I read that they can withstand 100+ C, I have seen my old SR go as high as 85 C on a normal clock...
     
  22. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #22
    Mobile processors throttle back at higher temperatures and are more robust. Then again you do pay for it. Remember I did say the following...

     
  23. Essjay macrumors regular

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    Jul 12, 2008
    #23
    Ah, ok thanks for the clarification.
     
  24. lscangus thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #24
    it measures up 105'C which is the throttle speed of my CPU

    But that happens when it is not overclocked....

    so, that means my MBP is defect probably.... or it may have toooo much termal paste on it, like the first gen MBP

    Angus
     
  25. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    #25
    In my testing Apple's SMC doesn't even throttle the fans until it's over ~90 C. The diode temperature readings are going to have a +/- slight deviation as well. I remember Intel releasing some documentation on Penryn's thermal diodes but the location escapes me right now.
     

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