Legal way to stream my movies at home?

iriejedi

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Oct 4, 2000
807
116
Nor Cal
Over the year I've amassed a really large DVD library.

Anyway to make it so I can stream it with a new Mac Mini or other hardware set up? So I can pick and choose without finding the disc and a disc player?

Seeking legal method for personally owned DVDs. Do not need online or remote - just in the house with various Apple TVs or smart TVs or even the new Mini I'm ordering....
 

hwojtek

macrumors 65816
Jan 26, 2008
1,133
236
Poznan, Poland
In most legislations you are allowed to create a backup (.iso file) or just a plain rip of the disc and then use it to stream from a NAS to an app like Kodi.
 

Ideanj

macrumors member
Apr 30, 2013
70
39
I rip all of my DVD's and Blu-Rays using MakeMKV (free!) and an external Blu-Ray drive. After running the file through MKVToolNix to add/remove any data (Chapters, titles, etc), I upload the file to an external hard drive connected to my Time Capsule and stream it through Infuse on my Apple TV and iOS devices. Works great and Infuse is simply beautiful (and affordable!)
 

iriejedi

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Oct 4, 2000
807
116
Nor Cal
I use a Plex server that streams it via Ethernet to any device logged in.

https://www.plex.tv/
Is there a few bullet point summary of how the DVDs get on the PLEX Server? Would you be so kind to make a 'shopping list" of soft and hardware required? Budget is around professional hobbyist level - high grade toy in a nice to have situation.
 

hwojtek

macrumors 65816
Jan 26, 2008
1,133
236
Poznan, Poland
1: DVD drive
2: MakeMKV

If you do not have a Mac with a DVD drive nor an external USB DVD drive, expect some $20 investment.
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
5,116
Handbrake is a nice app to use. It is free and more user-friendly than MakeMKV imo.

The downside is that it does not work with BluRays. It is great and easy for DVDs!
 
  • Like
Reactions: darkcompass

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,517
435
Estonia
Handbrake is a nice app to use. It is free and more user-friendly than MakeMKV imo.

The downside is that it does not work with BluRays. It is great and easy for DVDs!
I think the DeCSS library is not bundled in the HandBrake package, so you won't really be able to rip DVD's unless you find and set the missing DRM pieces up yourself.
MakeMKV comes armed with it all...
 
  • Like
Reactions: hwojtek

thisismyusername

macrumors 6502
Nov 1, 2015
346
430
legal method
There is no legal method in the US since you need to break the DVD's encryption to rip it and that's against the DMCA... or you could do what everyone else does and ignore that. Rip with MakeMKV and use Plex or Infuse to serve/stream/watch them. Compress with handbrake if storage space is an issue.

Would you be so kind to make a 'shopping list" of soft and hardware required? Budget is around professional hobbyist level - high grade toy in a nice to have situation.
That depends on your budget. I went the extreme overkill route when I built my server a few years ago (which does more than just run Plex)... Xeon processor, ECC RAM, 24TB in a ZFS raidz2 configuration. There are much cheaper alternatives and Plex doesn't require a ton of horsepower. You could, for example, build a cheap Linux box for a few hundred dollars. Lots of people here also use Mac Minis for this; you mentioned you just bought one so you could just use that along with maybe external HDs for storage.

I watch them on various devices including Rokus, Apple TVs, iPhones/iPads, and web browsers both at home and when we're traveling.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: niteflyr

BODYBUILDERPAUL

macrumors 68000
Feb 9, 2009
1,527
1,208
Barcelona
For ripping DVDs to your Mac, the nicest and easiest app that i've ever used to MDRP Mac DVDRipper Pro. It's just so straightforward to use and the quality seems excellent. It was recommended by a few of the guys a few years ago here on MacRumours. I use to use HandBrake a few years ago but the MALWARE scare from a year ago put me off for life. It was horribly shocking especially for non IT guys.

Good luck with all of the ripping. I wouldn't call it a nice thing to spend your valuable time on - I'm all in for iTunes, Vimeo and streaming for the last 10 years. The simplicity and reliability is just top notch :)
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
5,116
I think the DeCSS library is not bundled in the HandBrake package, so you won't really be able to rip DVD's unless you find and set the missing DRM pieces up yourself.
MakeMKV comes armed with it all...
Handbrake uses VLC to circumvent DRM DVDs. It does it automatically if VLC is installed on the computer. You might have to open VLC one time though, but after that, Handbrake automatically uses VLC to do the ripping.

It is much easier and user-friendly than MakeMKV.

To the OP: I suggest downloading Handbrake, VLC, and MetaZ for tags. All are very easy to use and free. There is a ATV setting on Handbrake, so it is very hard to screw it up.

If you use PLEX, you might not need to do your own tags, but I use PLEX and I still tag the encodes myself.

Seeking legal method for personally owned DVDs.
There is no legal method in the US since you need to break the DVD's encryption to rip it and that's against the DMCA
As for legality, I really don't know. I feel like it is a grey area, if you own the physical DVD, you should be able to choose the way you want to store and watch it. But, what I feel should be right, and what the law says is probably totally different.
 

Tech198

macrumors G5
Mar 21, 2011
13,944
1,636
Australia, Perth
Over the year I've amassed a really large DVD library.

Anyway to make it so I can stream it with a new Mac Mini or other hardware set up? So I can pick and choose without finding the disc and a disc player?

Seeking legal method for personally owned DVDs. Do not need online or remote - just in the house with various Apple TVs or smart TVs or even the new Mini I'm ordering....
AppleTV is needed.. unless want to connect Mac mini via HDMI port directly..

Mac mini may all that's needed. I have mac mini connected to HDMI, only because i screen share remotely, and unfortunately i hate how Apple changes the resolution to mach a laptop, just because the HDMI port is not connected.

Enable Home sharing, buy an external DVD (if you wanna convert DVD's) and run Handbrake or Ripit on Mac mini to convert

Handbrake uses VLC to circumvent DRM DVDs. It does it automatically if VLC is installed on the computer. You might have to open VLC one time though, but after that, Handbrake automatically uses VLC to do the ripping.

It is much easier and user-friendly than MakeMKV.

To the OP: I suggest downloading Handbrake, VLC, and MetaZ for tags. All are very easy to use and free. There is a ATV setting on Handbrake, so it is very hard to screw it up.

If you use PLEX, you might not need to do your own tags, but I use PLEX and I still tag the encodes myself.





As for legality, I really don't know. I feel like it is a grey area, if you own the physical DVD, you should be able to choose the way you want to store and watch it. But, what I feel should be right, and what the law says is probably totally different.
I don't think Handbrake does circumvent DVD's without libdvdcss , even with VLC installed.

This is only a "grey area", just like getting around geo-blocking, only because not because they don't know.. I personally reckon they know, but they wanna wait until the time comes then you'll find out.

Calling it a grey area, but not revealing why "yet"
 
Last edited:

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
5,116
I don't think Handbrake does circumvent DVD's without libdvdcss , even with VLC installed.
I just recently found this out to be true, but there is a super easy work around.

I just recently updated my Mac to MacOS 10.13, having used 10.11 for a long time. Handbrake used VLC for libdvdcss on 10.11, but in 10.12, this was no longer possible.

To the OP: Here is a super easy work-around on MacWorld.

I have used a few different rippers/encoders, and Handbrake seems to be the easiest to me, and it is totally free. I know a lot of ppl recommend MakeMKV for ripping, but Handbrake can rip and encode with a much easier UI. Plus MakeMKV costs $50ish.
 

Ideanj

macrumors member
Apr 30, 2013
70
39
I just recently found this out to be true, but there is a super easy work around.

I just recently updated my Mac to MacOS 10.13, having used 10.11 for a long time. Handbrake used VLC for libdvdcss on 10.11, but in 10.12, this was no longer possible.

To the OP: Here is a super easy work-around on MacWorld.

I have used a few different rippers/encoders, and Handbrake seems to be the easiest to me, and it is totally free. I know a lot of ppl recommend MakeMKV for ripping, but Handbrake can rip and encode with a much easier UI. Plus MakeMKV costs $50ish.
MakeMKV is free while in Beta, you just need to go to the forum and input the registration code into the app every 30 days. Also, I find MakeMKV much easier to use than HandBrake (not that HandBrake is difficult). It's 1 button to decrypt the disk, and after you select the file with the right length and amount of chapters (which is often apparent in the application itself) it's 1 click to rip. The only issue I see is MKV is the only format it supports, however if that's what you're looking for it's a no-brainer.
 

Longkeg

macrumors 6502
Jul 18, 2014
294
107
S. Florida
FYI: Plex, Infuse AND VLC will auto tag files so long as the standard naming/numbering protocols are followed. I haven’t had to tag a file in years.
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
5,116
after you select the file with the right length and amount of chapters (which is often apparent in the application itself)
This is the main issue I have with MakeMKV. the right file, with the right audio, and right subtitles always seemed much more difficult than Handbrake.

The only issue I see is MKV is the only format it supports
Another benefit of handbrake is having the presets for ATV, making it very easy to encode to a format that will work on iTunes. Although, I use Plex now and would recommend that.

FYI: Plex, Infuse AND VLC will auto tag files so long as the standard naming/numbering protocols are followed. I haven’t had to tag a file in years.
I mentioned this in an earlier post for Plex, but I sometimes prefer my tags over what is auto tagged in Plex. Sometimes, there is stuff missing, including posters.
 

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,517
435
Estonia
The only issue I see is MKV is the only format it supports,
Not exactly. I use the backup feature with decrypt option and get a 1:1 verbatim bluray m2ts file that plays as if coming from optical disc. As a backup, you will get the full disc structure actually, wrapped into ISO file.
Sans metadata and Dolby Vision, sadly. But these are the peculiarities BDA has created into the format.
Screenshot.jpg
 
Last edited:

ignatius345

macrumors 68020
Aug 20, 2015
2,320
3,077
Once ripped and tagged, you can park all your video files in iTunes and use Home Sharing to stream to Apple TV. Been doing this this way for years and it works quite well, provided you have a Mac running somewhere on your wifi network. Doesn't even have to be a very powerful Mac or anything. I was running a crusty old 2011 Mini for a while and it was totally fine -- even though my media external drive was connected though USB 2.0 :eek:. Even that was fast enough to stream 1080p video nicely.

Tagging is a bummer of course if you try to do it manually, so you want to use something that does it automatically. I've been using a transcoding/tagging app called iVI for a while now and it is generally quite reliable.
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
5,116
Once ripped and tagged, you can park all your video files in iTunes and use Home Sharing to stream to Apple TV. Been doing this this way for years and it works quite well, provided you have a Mac running somewhere on your wifi network. Doesn't even have to be a very powerful Mac or anything. I was running a crusty old 2011 Mini for a while and it was totally fine -- even though my media external drive was connected though USB 2.0 :eek:. Even that was fast enough to stream 1080p video nicely.

Tagging is a bummer of course if you try to do it manually, so you want to use something that does it automatically. I've been using a transcoding/tagging app called iVI for a while now and it is generally quite reliable.
I’m curious, why use the home movies section of iTunes versus the movies or TV show section?

Is this to keep it separate from content you purchased?
 

Ideanj

macrumors member
Apr 30, 2013
70
39
This is the main issue I have with MakeMKV. the right file, with the right audio, and right subtitles always seemed much more difficult than Handbrake.
I had this issue as well, however when setting the time limit to 3500 seconds or greater, it usually outputs 1-3 options to choose from. In Disney's case it's almost always the first file. Often times only 1 title displays as an option. It is overwhelming at first, I definitely agree with that.

Another benefit of handbrake is having the presets for ATV, making it very easy to encode to a format that will work on iTunes. Although, I use Plex now and would recommend that.
Very true as well. In my case I use an external hard drive connected to my Airport Time Capsule and stream on the Apple TV using Infuse, which reads and decodes MKV formats on the fly. Works amazingly well and looks beautiful while doing it.
[doublepost=1542323394][/doublepost]
Not exactly. I use the backup feature with decrypt option and get a 1:1 verbatim bluray m2ts file that plays as if coming from optical disc. As a backup, you will get the full disc structure actually, wrapped into ISO file.
Sans metadata and Dolby Vision, sadly. But these are the peculiarities BDA has created into the format.
View attachment 804393
Ahh yes, I forgot it had this capability as well. Thank you for the reminder!
 

vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
3,915
5,116
I had this issue as well, however when setting the time limit to 3500 seconds or greater, it usually outputs 1-3 options to choose from. In Disney's case it's almost always the first file. Often times only 1 title displays as an option. It is overwhelming at first, I definitely agree with that.
I would do little tricks like this, but not only did I sometimes still not be able to find what I was looking for, it didn't work as well for TV Shows, and special features, as those files would typically be much smaller, and would blend in with the "dummy" files.

A trick for DVDs that works perfectly for Handbrake and most likely MakeMKV as well is using the Mac's DVD player app and then play what ever I am trying to encode, such as a movie, special feature, tv show episode, and on the menu bar click on "Go" then "Title" to see exactly what one you need to choose.

That works great for DVDs and works every time for Handbrake, but for BluRays on MakeMKV, it was a crapshoot.
 

Ideanj

macrumors member
Apr 30, 2013
70
39
I would do little tricks like this, but not only did I sometimes still not be able to find what I was looking for, it didn't work as well for TV Shows, and special features, as those files would typically be much smaller, and would blend in with the "dummy" files.

A trick for DVDs that works perfectly for Handbrake and most likely MakeMKV as well is using the Mac's DVD player app and then play what ever I am trying to encode, such as a movie, special feature, tv show episode, and on the menu bar click on "Go" then "Title" to see exactly what one you need to choose.

That works great for DVDs and works every time for Handbrake, but for BluRays on MakeMKV, it was a crapshoot.
Great tip! I tried doing this with VLC but needed a plugin to read Blu-Rays and never finished the set up. I'll give this a go.
 

bt22

macrumors 6502
Feb 15, 2009
299
5
Alabama
Wanted to point out that MAKEMKV will rip an exact copy of the Blu-Ray or DVD. So if the Blu-Ray is 40GB your MAKEMKV will also be 40GB. Not sure of your storage options. Handbrake will compress the video... So the 40GB Blu-Ray will now be 5-10 GB and your DVD will be 1-2 GB.
 

ignatius345

macrumors 68020
Aug 20, 2015
2,320
3,077
I’m curious, why use the home movies section of iTunes versus the movies or TV show section?

Is this to keep it separate from content you purchased?
? I tag movies as movies. Home Sharing (if that’s what you were referring to) is just Apple’s name for the feature that lets you stream content from iTunes to other devices on the same wifi network.
 

Sele

macrumors newbie
Nov 16, 2018
1
0
I have two solutions for you.

Option 1: Use Vudu to turn your DVD discs to digital videos. This is a more legal way to stream your DVD movies. All you have to do is scan the barcode on the DVD box. And it’ll check whether this movie is available on their website. A single SD movie costs about $2 and one movie in HD needs $5. However, Vudu is not that economical if you have tons of DVD discs or love watching the HD videos.

Option 2: Rip the DVD with some DVD ripper like HandBrake, MacX DVD Ripper Pro, MakeMKV, etc. The first tool is a free open source one but it can not decrypt the DVDs. The second and third tools are not free but you can use them for a lifetime after the purchase.