Leopard pricing?

Nuks

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 25, 2006
504
0
How much is Leopard going to be for existing Mac users? Tiger is $90 at the Canadian education store. Will it be the same for Leopard, or will it be an upgrade type thing (a la Vista) where you pay a reduced price if you own the previous OS.

Thanks.
 

yellow

Moderator emeritus
Oct 21, 2003
16,033
1
Portland, OR
It will not b an upgrade thing..

In the US it's $129 for OS X, non-edu pricing.

Expect Leopard to be the same.
 

Aperture

macrumors 68000
Mar 19, 2006
1,877
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PA
It should cost as much as Tiger right now; there will be no upgrade price unless you buy your mac within like a week of the release. Although EDU pricing will be available.:)


Edit: Beat me!
 

WildCowboy

Administrator/Editor
Staff member
Jan 20, 2005
17,209
1,106
Leopard will in all likelihood be the same prices as Tiger. There will probably be a single license version at US$129, a family pack at US$199, and educational prices that may vary depending on your school.

No one knows for sure, but they've consistent over the last few releases...no reason to think they'll change.
 

gnasher729

macrumors P6
Nov 25, 2005
16,574
3,153
schaef2493 said:
It should cost as much as Tiger right now; there will be no upgrade price unless you buy your mac within like a week of the release. Although EDU pricing will be available.:)


Edit: Beat me!
To be more precise, all Apple operating systems for sale have always been upgrades - it just wasn't printed on the package. So for Leopard, you are going to pay exactly the same upgrade price as for Tiger, Leopard or Jaguar. And this time, it will say "upgrade" on the package.

Should Apple decide to produce a non-upgrade version as well for people who don't own Tiger, I would expect it to cost something like $399, whereas Macintosh users will pay $129 for an upgrade.
 

WildCowboy

Administrator/Editor
Staff member
Jan 20, 2005
17,209
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gnasher729 said:
To be more precise, all Apple operating systems for sale have always been upgrades - it just wasn't printed on the package. So for Leopard, you are going to pay exactly the same upgrade price as for Tiger, Leopard or Jaguar. And this time, it will say "upgrade" on the package.

Should Apple decide to produce a non-upgrade version as well for people who don't own Tiger, I would expect it to cost something like $399, whereas Macintosh users will pay $129 for an upgrade.
This is not true...all retail versions of OS X allow both full installs and upgrade installs at the same price. You do not have to have a prior version of OS X in order to install from the discs.
 

GimmeSlack12

macrumors 603
Apr 29, 2005
5,395
7
San Francisco
WildCowboy said:
This is not true...all retail versions of OS X allow both full installs and upgrade installs at the same price. You do not have to have a prior version of OS X in order to install from the discs.
I 2nd this notion.

$399!? What do you think we are talking about? Windows?
 

zulgand04

macrumors regular
Jul 16, 2002
240
6
Northborough, MA
gnasher729 said:
To be more precise, all Apple operating systems for sale have always been upgrades - it just wasn't printed on the package. So for Leopard, you are going to pay exactly the same upgrade price as for Tiger, Leopard or Jaguar. And this time, it will say "upgrade" on the package.

Should Apple decide to produce a non-upgrade version as well for people who don't own Tiger, I would expect it to cost something like $399, whereas Macintosh users will pay $129 for an upgrade.
Nope totally wrong. The only time theres ever a upgrade only disk is if u buy a computer after the new os is released then u qualify for the upgrade only disk. The retail versions are full versions.

-Neal
 

screensaver400

macrumors 6502a
Jan 28, 2005
834
0
Well, in a sense they have all been upgrades. That is, you can't use Mac OS X on any computer other than a Mac, and all Macs come with a copy of Mac OS X. As long as you have a prior copy of Mac OS X, you're okay.

Windows upgrade versions are different. Since you can slap together a PC from standard parts, there is a need for a "full version" and an "upgrade." However, even the Upgrade includes a full install. It just checks for ownership of a prior copy (you can put an old Windows CD in the drive to validate an "upgrade").
 

milo

macrumors 604
Sep 23, 2003
6,887
511
WildCowboy said:
This is not true...all retail versions of OS X allow both full installs and upgrade installs at the same price. You do not have to have a prior version of OS X in order to install from the discs.
But at this point, 10.5 will probably only run on machines that shipped with OSX. In theory, if you can find a machine that runs it but still only has OS9 on it, you could install it. But there aren't really any of those left, so pretty much every user buying 10.5 will be upgrading an earlier version of OSX.

You can look at it as all upgrade or no upgrade, but it's really the same thing - there's only one category of person buying, so there's only one price.
 

yellow

Moderator emeritus
Oct 21, 2003
16,033
1
Portland, OR
milo said:
But at this point, 10.5 will probably only run on machines that shipped with OSX. In theory, if you can find a machine that runs it but still only has OS9 on it, you could install it. But there aren't really any of those left, so pretty much every user buying 10.5 will be upgrading an earlier version of OSX.
Not sure I'd go there.. the final days of the dual-boot (OS X/OS 9) MDD G4s will definitely take 10.5 and shouldn't be too hard to find.. oh hey, I have 2 under my desk! ;)
 

Le Big Mac

macrumors 68030
Jan 7, 2003
2,589
166
Washington, DC
milo said:
You can look at it as all upgrade or no upgrade, but it's really the same thing - there's only one category of person buying, so there's only one price.
Exactly. Who would be the person paying $400 for the "full" version? I don't think such a person exists.

If you mean to raise the question of whether OS X will ever run on a non-apple produced computer (i.e., a Dell or something), that's a different question debated many places. And, yes, if that were ever to happen, hte pricing might be different. Or it might not.