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LG is working to supply Apple with OLED display panels for two iPad models before providing larger panels for the company's first OLED MacBook around 2025, The Elec reports.

Oled-iPads-and-MackBook-Pro-Notch.jpg

LG Display is reportedly aiming to supply Apple with Gen 8.5 OLED panels for Apple's first OLED MacBook. The device is said to be scheduled to launch "around 2025."

LG has been evaluating the deposition process to manufacture Gen 8.5 OLED panels at its Paju facility since December 2021, The Elec claims. The evaluation procedure will purportedly take up to a year to complete. Previous reports have indicated that LG's factory in Paju, South Korea, is instrumental in Apple's plans to offer iPads with OLED displays, as well as to increase its supply of OLED displays for future iPhone models.

The Elec also explained that LG is planning to use its Gen 6 OLED production lines for 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad models, which will debut at some time earlier than the first OLED MacBook. Since the launch of the OLED MacBooks around 2025 will come after Apple's first two OLED iPads, LG is planning to use larger substrates such as Gen 8.5 since more panels can be cut out per substrate in less time.

Yesterday, renowned Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo tweeted that the launch of Apple's first MacBook with an OLED display is dependent on the launch of 11-inch and 12.9-inch OLED iPad models in 2024, which correlates with today's report from The Elec:



LG is believed to be planning to begin mass production of LTPO OLED panels for iPads between 2023 and 2024, making the rumored 2025 timeframe for the launch of the first OLED MacBook plausible.

Article Link: LG Working to Bring OLED Displays to Future iPad and MacBook Models
 

BoneHead001

macrumors 6502a
Nov 13, 2013
526
243
Livonia,MI
I don't understand why OLED is on the roadmap. I thought mini-LED was the path forward, since it has the vast majority of the contrast advantages of OLED without sacrificing brightness or the risk of burn-in.
Yes, I agree. OLED has beautiful contrast, but brightness and burn-in are big set backs.
 

EugW

macrumors G4
Jun 18, 2017
11,572
9,043
I don't understand why OLED is on the roadmap. I thought mini-LED was the path forward, since it has the vast majority of the contrast advantages of OLED without sacrificing brightness or the risk of burn-in.

Mini-LED is not the path forward. It is an interim stop-gap product, supposedly before microLED.

The problem is that microLED appropriate for iPad Pros is still effectively vapourware.

The question is which will come first, OLED or minroLED, that meets Apple’s design requirements? I’d say we’re actually closer with OLED, OLED’s disadvantages notwithstanding.
 
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xxray

macrumors 68020
Jul 27, 2013
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I don't understand why OLED is on the roadmap. I thought mini-LED was the path forward, since it has the vast majority of the contrast advantages of OLED without sacrificing brightness or the risk of burn-in.

There has been no history of burn-in on any Apple OLED display. OLED brightness levels are already not far from brightness on mini-LED displays, and non-HDR content is actually brighter on iPhone and Apple Watch OLED displays than the iPad Pro and MacBook Pro mini-LED displays.

It doesn’t bother some people, but for me, blooming is a major issue on mini-LED displays. It’s my biggest complaint about my 2021 12.9 iPad Pro. I’d choose OLED over mini-LED anyday.
 

Jim Lahey

macrumors 68000
Apr 8, 2014
1,709
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Micro-LED in affordable consumer products is a bit like non-invasive blood glucose monitoring in smart devices...always just around the corner. OLED on the other hand is already maturing and has largely overcome its limitations. From my understanding, something pretty major will have to happen to micro-LED manufacturing processes for it to rapidly become a viable usurper to OLED. Not saying that can't happen, but even if it does, you can bet your last dollar that Apple will be at least five years late to that party as well. In other words don't hold your breath either way.
 

Moonjumper

macrumors 68030
Jun 20, 2009
2,685
2,699
Lincoln, UK
There has been no history of burn-in on any Apple OLED display. OLED brightness levels are already not far from brightness on mini-LED displays, and non-HDR content is actually brighter on iPhone and Apple Watch OLED displays than the iPad Pro and MacBook Pro mini-LED displays.

It doesn’t bother some people, but for me, blooming is a major issue on mini-LED displays. It’s my biggest complaint about my 2021 12.9 iPad Pro. I’d choose OLED over mini-LED anyday.
I agree. Blooming is a major problem when designing graphics for my games. It means miniLED is not an option for me.

OLED burn-in is getting near the levels it was on CRT monitors when done properly: Only an issue in certain circumstances, or if the screen is abused.

Dell are offering a 3-year warranty against burn-in on their new QD-OLED monitor, and they list it as flicker-free. It seems the problems really are going away. I hope Samsung starts to make QD-OLED monitor panels in formats other than curved ultra-wide soon (flat 3:2 at retina density would be perfect, but 16:9 will suffice).
 

julesme

macrumors 6502a
Oct 14, 2016
537
1,931
San Jose
I've been really impressed by the mini LED display in my 14" MacBook Pro, and I'd love to see something similar in the 11" iPad. Please Apple, let's get HDR on the 11".
 

darngooddesign

macrumors G5
Jul 4, 2007
12,888
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Atlanta, GA
There has been no history of burn-in on any Apple OLED display. OLED brightness levels are already not far from brightness on mini-LED displays, and non-HDR content is actually brighter on iPhone and Apple Watch OLED displays than the iPad Pro and MacBook Pro mini-LED displays.
Mac screens are regularly on for a full day, phones and watches are not. The chances or laptop burn-in are far greater.
 

Jim Lahey

macrumors 68000
Apr 8, 2014
1,709
3,208
Don’t forget that even without burn-in OLEDs can degrade unevenly over time and result in streaky or blotchy near-black performance. Especially at around 5% greyscale where they exhibit serious screen uniformity problems if they reach this point. It’s less of an issue now than it previously was, perhaps even totally eliminated, but personally I’d still be a bit nervous about using one as a computer monitor or laptop. Especially an eye-wateringly expensive computer monitor/laptop, as any Apple OLED will most certainly be.
 
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