Linksys Debuts Its First 2-in-1 Cable Modem and Wi-Fi Router

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Linksys today introduced its first 2-in-1 wireless router and cable modem. The emphasis should be on "cable" in that sentence, as Linksys already sells a handful of routers with built-in DSL modems for internet over a telephone line.


The Linksys CG7500 supports many of the latest wireless standards, including 802.11ac Wi-Fi, IPv6, and beamforming technology. The AC1900-speed router has 3X3 internal dual-band 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz antennas, 24x8 channels, four Gigabit Ethernet ports for high-speed wired connections, and one USB 2.0 port.

The modem is DOCSIS 3.0 certified, meaning it is compatible with Comcast Xfinity and Charter Spectrum in the United States, and many other major cable providers, for internet plans with theoretical speeds of up to 300 Mbps. Linksys says it can be used with 12+ devices at once without any lag or buffering.

2-in-1 modems and routers are often considered worse than a separate router and modem combination, but the CG7500 is worth considering for anyone that wants to stop renting a modem from their cable company. For most people, it'll likely provide good enough Wi-Fi in a medium-sized house or apartment.

Linksys is accepting pre-orders for the CG7500 on its website for $199.97 in the United States. It'll be available from Amazon, Best Buy, B&H, Micro Center, New Egg, Office Depot, Target, Walmart, Fry's, and Meijer on May 15.

Competing 2-in-1 options include the NETGEAR AC1900 Nighthawk for around the same price of $198.99, and the Arris SURFboard SBG6900-AC with a reduced 16x4 channels for a current sale price of $167.99 (regular $199.99).

Article Link: Linksys Debuts Its First 2-in-1 Cable Modem and Wi-Fi Router
 
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OldSchoolMacGuy

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Use to work for both Time Warner and Comcast. I'd highly suggest NOT going with a 2 in 1 combo.

Cable modems are sensitive hardware. There are often minor power fluctuations within the cable system and these can cause your modem to be damaged (resulting in fun stuff like flapping, microrefractions, and more), which can lead to service issues.

When you rent a modem from the cable company, they replace it when it blows out. The other option is to buy an inexpensive one (about $100), though with the rate many people go through them, they may never recoup the price.

At least with a standalone router, you don't have to replace 2 pieces of expensive hardware should there be any flux on your line.
 
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justperry

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Linksys today introduced its first 2-in-1 wireless router and cable modem. The emphasis should be on "cable" in that sentence, as Linksys already sells a handful of routers with built-in DSL modems for internet over a telephone line.
The
Linksys CG7500
supports many of the latest wireless technologies, including 802.11ac Wi-Fi, IPv6, and beamforming technology. The AC1900 router has 3X3 internal dual-band 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz antennas, 24x8 channels, four Gigabit Ethernet ports for high-speed wired connections, and one USB 2.0 port.​

Linksys is crap.​

The modem is DOCSIS 3.0 certified, meaning it is compatible with Comcast Xfinity and Charter Spectrum in the United States, and many other major cable providers, for internet plans with theoretical speeds of up to 300 Mbps. It can be used with 12+ devices at once, including Macs, PCs, iPhones, and iPads.

Hahaha...ha....ha, can't stop laughing, I have one which supports up to 200 devices.(Not Linksys)


Use to work for both Time Warner and Comcast. I'd highly suggest NOT going with a 2 in 1 combo.

Cable modems are sensitive hardware. There are often minor power fluctuations within the cable system and these can cause your modem to be damaged (resulting in fun stuff like flapping, microrefractions, and more), which can lead to service issues.

When you rent a modem from the cable company, they replace it when it blows out. The other option is to buy an inexpensive one (about $100), though with the rate many people go through them, they may never recoup the price.

At least with a standalone router, you don't have to replace 2 pieces of expensive hardware should there be any flux on your line.

You know, they won't cost them (ISP) the price you normally pay, if you pay $100 for a Modem they very likely have them for half of that (Or less) just because they buy them by the millions.
 
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OldSchoolMacGuy

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Linksys is crap.​




Hahaha...ha....ha, can't stop laughing, I have one which supports up to 200 devices.(Not Linksys)
You're super cool bro. I bet everyone wants to be your friend.

This router can support well over 100 devices. They point out it can support 12+ devices simultaneously without lag or buffering. That's thanks to the 3x3 AC and isn't something every wireless router can do.
[doublepost=1494522725][/doublepost]
You know, they won't cost them (ISP) the price you normally pay, if you pay $100 for a Modem they very likely have them for half of that (Or less) just because they buy them by the millions.
What you've written A) doesn't make sense, B) nor does it matter here.

Yes, the ISP pays less for their modems than you do as they buy in very large quantity. Why does that matter? It doesn't change the price the consumer pays if they want to buy their own modem nor does it change the price the consumer pays to rent one. It's a totally moot point.
 

iReality85

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I'm surprised Linksys didn't offer one previously.

I've owned an Arris (Motorola) Surfboard, the $169 model for two years now, and won't be going back to a split modem/router setup. It's nice to have, if for none other than convenience. If you happen to move you just simply call up your ISP and they'll do everything on their end over the phone to hook you up. No need to have them come out, unless they've never serviced the property before.

Plus, you own it. I have a thing about using refurbished equipment that has been used (abused?) in other people's households. And who knows how old of a model you'll get. Besides, if you opt for high speed internet (like FIOS or pretty much any 50MB+ speed) and don't own one of these, your ISP will come out and set you up with one anyway. And you'll have to pay rent on it, so you might as well get your own. That's what prompted me to finally just get one.

You should check with your ISP's approved vendor list before buying one to make sure a particular model is supported.
 
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BeefCake 15

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Linksys is crap.​

Prey tell why?


Hahaha...ha....ha, can't stop laughing, I have one which supports up to 200 devices.(Not Linksys)

Is that also a home router? Have you tested it under 200 devices load, seems like a nice marketing gimmick with theoretical possibilities but I may be wrong too....





You know, they won't cost them (ISP) the price you normally pay, if you pay $100 for a Modem they very likely have them for half of that (Or less) just because they buy them by the millions.
 

justperry

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You're super cool bro. I bet everyone wants to be your friend.

This router can support well over 100 devices. They point out it can support 12+ devices simultaneously without lag or buffering. That's thanks to the 3x3 AC and isn't something every wireless router can do.

What you've written A) doesn't make sense, B) nor does it matter here.

Yes, the ISP pays less for their modems than you do as they buy in very large quantity. Why does that matter? It doesn't change the price the consumer pays if they want to buy their own modem nor does it change the price the consumer pays to rent one. It's a totally moot point.

Linksys is (IMHO) still crap, there are far better choices out there, I don't like nor recommend any consumer router/Modem just because they are of inferior quality.

And it wasn't a moot point because you said this:

though with the rate many people go through them, they may never recoup the price.
If they pay far less than what you pay it's much easier for them to recover their costs.
 
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bbrks

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Linksys is crap.​




Hahaha...ha....ha, can't stop laughing, I have one which supports up to 200 devices.(Not Linksys)





You know, they won't cost them (ISP) the price you normally pay, if you pay $100 for a Modem they very likely have them for half of that (Or less) just because they buy them by the millions.
Hmmmm, I see you hate Linksys big time.....may I ask why....traumatic childhood, or anything similar :)

I mean, above explanation of yours is crap.....could you try to be more specific :)
BTW, I think, they have great product......hope you understand :)
 
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justperry

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Hmmmm, I see you hate Linksys big time.....may I ask why....traumatic childhood, or anything similar :)

I mean, above explanation of yours is crap.....could you try to be more specific :)
BTW, I think, they have great product......hope you understand :)
It's just consumer grade stuff, had a few of them, always gave me headaches.
And no-one here uses Linksys anymore, or very little, hardly ever see a (WIFI) router when out and about.
[doublepost=1494524078][/doublepost]
Is that also a home router? Have you tested it under 200 devices load, seems like a nice marketing gimmick with theoretical possibilities but I may be wrong too....
I use/have Ubiquiti, not expensive and lots better.
 

iReality85

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I don't mean to question Linksys's expertise in decent networking hardware, but DOCSIS 3.0 -compliance is... ancient by today's standards. And so is USB 2.0...
Every ISP requires DOCSIS (and usually 3.0), so there has to be compliance. It's been around awhile. Most people aren't even aware of the standard since they rent their modems from their ISPs, rather than own them.
 

briloronmacrumo

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Article seems close to a cut/paste of the manufacturer's announcement. Nothing wrong with that but some added value would be nice. For example, was the writer able to successfully use it with their Mac ( presumably nothing on the Mac would exclude its use but having a positive statement is nevertheless helpful ), iDevice and their service provider( ISP ). Does it achieve the manufacturer's claims ( for speed, compatibility, range etc. ). Thank you to MR for making us aware of this new option.
 
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ksnell

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Use to work for both Time Warner and Comcast. I'd highly suggest NOT going with a 2 in 1 combo.

Cable modems are sensitive hardware. There are often minor power fluctuations within the cable system and these can cause your modem to be damaged (resulting in fun stuff like flapping, microrefractions, and more), which can lead to service issues.

When you rent a modem from the cable company, they replace it when it blows out. The other option is to buy an inexpensive one (about $100), though with the rate many people go through them, they may never recoup the price.

At least with a standalone router, you don't have to replace 2 pieces of expensive hardware should there be any flux on your line.
I wholeheartedly agree. This is a PSA: Buy these devices separately so they can be upgraded/replaced separately when they get damaged, go obsolete, or you change internet service to something else.

Often times buying a cable modem so you don't have a leasing fee will pay for itself within the 1 year warranty period of the device.
 
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thebeans

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Use to work for both Time Warner and Comcast. I'd highly suggest NOT going with a 2 in 1 combo.

Cable modems are sensitive hardware. There are often minor power fluctuations within the cable system and these can cause your modem to be damaged (resulting in fun stuff like flapping, microrefractions, and more), which can lead to service issues.

When you rent a modem from the cable company, they replace it when it blows out. The other option is to buy an inexpensive one (about $100), though with the rate many people go through them, they may never recoup the price.

At least with a standalone router, you don't have to replace 2 pieces of expensive hardware should there be any flux on your line.
I signed up for Comcast internet in spring 2011. They charged $7.00 per month then for the modem. I bought a Motorola surfboard for about $70 at that time. Still going strong. I would have paid $504 in rental fees by now. Don't think for a minute that you will save by renting. Even if you need to replace a time or two in 6 years you are still way better off buying your own. If you are having to replace frequently, have your grounding and power checked.
 

flurffmeister

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Dec 3, 2008
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Use to work for both Time Warner and Comcast. I'd highly suggest NOT going with a 2 in 1 combo.

Cable modems are sensitive hardware. There are often minor power fluctuations within the cable system and these can cause your modem to be damaged (resulting in fun stuff like flapping, microrefractions, and more), which can lead to service issues.

When you rent a modem from the cable company, they replace it when it blows out. The other option is to buy an inexpensive one (about $100), though with the rate many people go through them, they may never recoup the price.

At least with a standalone router, you don't have to replace 2 pieces of expensive hardware should there be any flux on your line.
Buy better hardware I guess?

I bought an $80 modem 3.5 years ago, haven't had a single problem with it (Motorola Surfboard SB6141)
 
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Weaselboy

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According to the Linksys web site, that cable modem uses the Intel Puma 6 chipset. There is a long DSL reports thread documenting lag issues with that chipset that I believe has still not been fixed. If you Google "puma 6 chipset bugs" there are a lot of articles on this.

For now, I would stay away from this unit.

Screen Shot 2017-05-11 at 12.00.38 PM.png
 

Scott6666

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It doesn't seem to reference a phone port. So if you have Comcast Triple Play (because they practically force you to get phone service) then this does not work?
 

Weaselboy

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It doesn't seem to reference a phone port. So if you have Comcast Triple Play (because they practically force you to get phone service) then this does not work?
It would work, but only for your Internet service. You would need to put on a coax splitter and run another cable to the old modem (eMTA combo) to run your phone service.

I ran into this with Time Warner when I switched to my own modem to save the monthly fee. They activated my cable modem and disabled the Internet part of the old box and left the MTA phone portion of the old modem active for phone service.
 
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iReality85

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I signed up for Comcast internet in spring 2011. They charged $7.00 per month then for the modem. I bought a Motorola surfboard for about $70 at that time. Still going strong. I would have paid $504 in rental fees by now. Don't think for a minute that you will save by renting. Even if you need to replace a time or two in 6 years you are still way better off buying your own. If you are having to replace frequently, have your grounding and power checked.
Yeah same here. I don't understand people's arguments for buying separately.

I've convinced at least two coworkers since I bought mine to go with a cable modem, and they love it and have no regrets.

Basic math says that unless you're wrecking your modem every 1-2 years, you're better off buying your own cable modem than paying $6-8 in rent per month, and it's extremely unlikely your ISP is going to show up and give you a brand new one out of the box.

As I said in my other comment, you're likely to get someone's reused/refurbished one, and who knows what it's been through. I've already owned mine for 2 years, so the $169 I spend on my Surfboard is already paying itself back. Haven't had one ounce of trouble. Not really sure what's not to like about cable modems.
 
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Eorlas

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I have an Arris 6191, and prior to that a 6141. I've been with Comcast for years and have never used their hardware, for which the $10-12/month lease fee has easily paid for both of these as I got them on big sales.

I've got an ASUS AC3100 that replaced an N66U, and I have 0% issues with connectivity. Netflix can be streaming in 4k one spot, and I can be streaming a game in ultra quality settings to a Steam link while laptops & phones, etc will be connected as well.

Can't really speak for the benefit of going with a hybrid setup unless the load upon the gateway is going to be relatively low.
 
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macduke

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Sounds like twice the heat. These sorts of devices aren't really known for being very reliable since they're constantly in use, so I'd also say double the chance of failure. Although my modem has been a champ, just the WiFi has had issues over the years. Furthermore, DOCSIS 3.0 doesn't seem very modern. My current modem is DOCSIS 3.0, and I bought it around 2010, but it's fine for now because I'm only on a 200Mbps connection. But if my current modem died, no way I'd get something that maxes out at 300mbps when my AC router is like 1.3Gbps.
 
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Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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Linksys is crap.​




Hahaha...ha....ha, can't stop laughing, I have one which supports up to 200 devices.(Not Linksys).
I honestly can't take your post as serious, nor truthful. It's an opinion at best. One anecdotal opinion about Linksys says nothing in terms of what it's capable of. And there support has been stellar with ANY issues I have encountered, which says milestones about the Company.
 
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