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Apr 12, 2001
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After Steve Jobs' passing last year, a number of so-called "lost interviews" with the iconic businessman were released, but Fast Company claims it has "a treasure trove of unearthed interviews, conducted by the writer who knew [Jobs] best."

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Since 1985, reporter Brent Schlender had covered Steve Jobs for Fortune and the Wall Street Journal and discovered three dozen tapes with recordings of interviews Schlender had conducted with Jobs over 25 years:
Rummaging through the storage shed, I discovered some three dozen tapes holding recordings of extended interviews--some lasting as long as three hours--that I'd conducted with him periodically over the past 25 years. Many I had never replayed--a couple hadn't even been transcribed before now. Some were interrupted by his kids bolting into the kitchen as we talked. During others, he would hit the pause button himself before saying something he feared might come back to bite him. Listening to them again with the benefit of hindsight, the ones that took place during that interregnum jump out as especially enlightening.
The interviews cover much of the time that Jobs spent at Pixar, which often gets forgotten because of what he did putting Apple on top of the corporate world. But, of all that Schlender shares of Steve Jobs is the change in Jobs after he marries Laurene Powell-Jobs and starts a family.
Even after he went back to Apple, there was nothing Jobs liked more than spending time at home. Not that he wasn't a workaholic. We were iChat buddies for several years, so his name would pop up whenever he was working at his computer at home. Almost invariably, he was in front of his Mac until after midnight. We'd occasionally have a video chat, and if it took place early in the evening, I'd often see one of his children in the background looking on.
The full article, "The Lost Steve Jobs Tapes" -- as well as the selected highlights from the interviews themselves -- are worth a read and show some of the personal and professional growth that Jobs experienced during his years at NeXT and Pixar.

Article Link: Lost Interviews Offer a Unique View of Steve Jobs
 

macus3r

macrumors regular
Aug 30, 2005
105
28
Tim's the man, but I think everyone can agree: there'll never be anybody else like Steve.

I miss the guy...
 
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Stouver

macrumors member
Mar 13, 2012
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I would be really interested to hear some of these if they were ever released.
 
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hobo.hopkins

macrumors 6502a
Jul 30, 2008
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I hope at least some of these are released. They sound fascinating. Love him or hate him he was definitely brilliant.
 
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appsforkids

macrumors member
Apr 7, 2012
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I would love to see these, Jobs always gave a great interview and you never knew what he was going to say next. Unlike most he controlled the direction of the interview.
 
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CFreymarc

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Sep 4, 2009
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While I'm sure there will be a release of a professionally edited with narrative commentary version. I'd love to hear a "raw dump" of these tapes streaming in my office as I work during the day. That is a subscription I'd gladly pay for over a few months.
 
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ProVideo

macrumors 6502
Jun 28, 2011
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While I'm sure there will be a release of a professionally edited with narrative commentary version. I'd love to hear a "raw dump" of these tapes streaming in my office as I work during the day. That is a subscription I'd gladly pay for over a few months.

I want a soundbyte of him saying "This is ****" on an infinite loop.
 
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IJ Reilly

macrumors P6
Jul 16, 2002
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Palookaville
Steve took very different approaches to his running of NeXT and Pixar during his out-of-Apple years. His total control-freak tendencies took over at NeXT and led to that company's lack of success. Curiously at almost the same time he ran Pixar with a much looser grip and it thrived. It it so difficult to reconcile this with his behavior on his return to Apple, which he ran much more like NeXT or Apple before 1985. What did Steve really learn during the NeXT and Pixar years that transformed him into one of history's great CEOs? I don't think the biography quite comes to grips with this issue. I'd like to know more.
 
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nexsta

macrumors 6502
Jul 21, 2007
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I bet it's not long before some people will start framing their email response from steve and hang it on their wall.
 
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mobi

macrumors 6502
Jul 26, 2004
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Penn's Woods
His vision and focus over the past 3 decades give me productivity and utility that I cherish every day!
 
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CupertinoRat

macrumors member
May 27, 2011
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Steve - your vision, your enthusiasm and your business acumen are greatly missed.

With the recently introduced uninspiring "new iPad" Apple is clearly headed in the wrong direction.

I fear for Apple in this post-Jobs era.
 
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BornAgainMac

macrumors 604
Feb 4, 2004
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Steve - your vision, your enthusiasm and your business acumen are greatly missed.

With the recently introduced uninspiring "new iPad" Apple is clearly headed in the wrong direction.

I fear for Apple in this post-Jobs era.

For years the iPod line has been minor. The iPad will grow by it's uses and software. The hardware and form factor need not change much. Steve gone will not change Apple as much as you think. I miss the keynotes and the email responses though.
 
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AmpSkillz

macrumors regular
Steve took very different approaches to his running of NeXT and Pixar during his out-of-Apple years. His total control-freak tendencies took over at NeXT and led to that company's lack of success. Curiously at almost the same time he ran Pixar with a much looser grip and it thrived.

Technically both companies were pretty much failures in the beginning and successes in the end. Although Pixars success came just before being acquired and Nexts success being a direct result of acquisition. Success is success, failure is failure, so I dont know why you are insinuating that they had completely different outcomes.
 
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CFreymarc

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Sep 4, 2009
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I bet it's not long before some people will start framing their email response from steve and hang it on their wall.

This is already done with Steve Jobs business cards. One guy in Los Gatos I know has four framed in his den. They are the six colored Apple business card, NeXT, his Pixar business card (was told quite rare) and his metal Apple business card.

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Technically both companies were pretty much failures in the beginning and successes in the end. Although Pixars success came just before being acquired and Nexts success being a direct result of acquisition. Success is success, failure is failure, so I dont know why you are insinuating that they had completely different outcomes.

If you profit form it personally, professionally or revenue wise, it is a success. Many people have have "failures" that gave them experience and positions that would have never achieved if they didn't try.

I recently interviewed on gal and on her resume nothing but middle management positions on only Fortune 500 technology companies. This was a fifty people emerging company. I just read the resume, sighed and said to her "You really played it safe for your career. Why you coming here?" Her look was in amazement and disgust.

The interview was very polite, she dodged all the intrusive questions and I walked her out the front door. Never heard for her again and didn't bother to contact her.
 
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JHankwitz

macrumors 68000
Oct 31, 2005
1,911
58
Wisconsin
How can these interviews possibly be released if they're "lost". I think they should have used "recently found" interviews. It's no wonder people have such a difficult time communicating when they constantly misuse terminology.

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While I'm sure there will be a release of a professionally edited with narrative commentary version. I'd love to hear a "raw dump" of these tapes streaming in my office as I work during the day. That is a subscription I'd gladly pay for over a few months.

It's unfortunate that most everything we see and hear has been filtered and redefined through multiple perspectives and editors before we get it. As everyone throws in their own perspective colors, we all get to see either a bland gray or some obscure vivid color nowhere near the original.
 
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IJ Reilly

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Jul 16, 2002
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Palookaville
Technically both companies were pretty much failures in the beginning and successes in the end. Although Pixars success came just before being acquired and Nexts success being a direct result of acquisition. Success is success, failure is failure, so I dont know why you are insinuating that they had completely different outcomes.

Success in business is defined as profitability. I don't think NeXT was ever profitable. It was kept afloat by repeated capital infusions, mostly from Steve himself. In fact when the company was purchased by Apple the general reaction was astonishment at the price given that the company was unprofitable and had no other prospects. That "success" (if you want to call it that) was really only made possible by Jean Louis Gassee's highly inflated idea of what Be was worth, and that he thought the deal was in the bag.

Pixar went through a couple of major transformations before it became profitable, but it did become a big money-maker long before the merger with Disney. That company was a success in business terms. So yes, the outcomes were very different.
 
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DisMyMac

macrumors 65816
Sep 30, 2009
1,087
11
I wonder if someone had challenged his illegal parking, maybe he'd have given 'em the car or something. Not trying to make excuses... it's just curious why someone would do that.
 
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Igantius

macrumors 65816
Apr 29, 2007
1,241
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Success in business is defined as profitability. I don't think NeXT was ever profitable. It was kept afloat by repeated capital infusions, mostly from Steve himself...

Although Jobs did invest money at different times as you say, the bulk of the money came from other sources - e.g. Canon's first investment was $100 million. Jobs' total investment was a little over $30 million, I think.
 
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IJ Reilly

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Jul 16, 2002
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Although Jobs did invest money at different times as you say, the bulk of the money came from other sources - e.g. Canon's first investment was $100 million. Jobs' total investment was a little over $30 million, I think.

Ross Perot also invested a large sum. But according to the book, Steve had to recapitalize the company several times.
 
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tomsamson

macrumors member
Mar 7, 2012
54
6
I´m among those missing Steve. I feel like Apple is already changing (for the worse). "The new iPad" sounds kinda quite uninspired to me and handing out dividends to shareholders (instead of wisely reinvesting them into the company) sounds very un Jobs to me, too.
Well, i hope Tim and the others grow into leading Apple the way we´d all like it to be but yeah, in either case, more than for the business decisions i´ll miss Steve since he was so great at doing such inspiring talks and just being a very inspiring person.

Besides all that: I want to hear those tapes, come on.
 
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reallynotnick

macrumors 65816
Oct 21, 2005
1,030
688
I´m among those missing Steve. I feel like Apple is already changing (for the worse). "The new iPad" sounds kinda quite uninspired to me and handing out dividends to shareholders (instead of wisely reinvesting them into the company) sounds very un Jobs to me, too.
Well, i hope Tim and the others grow into leading Apple the way we´d all like it to be but yeah, in either case, more than for the business decisions i´ll miss Steve since he was so great at doing such inspiring talks and just being a very inspiring person.

Besides all that: I want to hear those tapes, come on.

The new iPad is exactly like Apple, they are dropping the numbers just like every other product they sell (besides the iPhone).

Though I agree the dividends is kind of upsetting, but I don't think Apple actually had that much needing investing. They are a very focused company and aren't looking to become a mess by buying a bunch of companies and they already seem to have R&D down.

I do REALLY want to listen to those tapes though, I would just love to hear Steve in free flow. The only time's I really heard him speak was his keynotes everything else was transcribed.
 
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Duncan-UK

macrumors 6502
Sep 17, 2006
387
630
Re Jobs' "passing" - what did he pass??

Why the ridiculous tip-toeing around the subject - the man DIED - simple as that.

Why cant the article say - after Steve Jobs died?
 
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mdriftmeyer

macrumors 68040
Feb 2, 2004
3,376
1,107
Pacific Northwest
Success in business is defined as profitability. I don't think NeXT was ever profitable. It was kept afloat by repeated capital infusions, mostly from Steve himself. In fact when the company was purchased by Apple the general reaction was astonishment at the price given that the company was unprofitable and had no other prospects. That "success" (if you want to call it that) was really only made possible by Jean Louis Gassee's highly inflated idea of what Be was worth, and that he thought the deal was in the bag.

Pixar went through a couple of major transformations before it became profitable, but it did become a big money-maker long before the merger with Disney. That company was a success in business terms. So yes, the outcomes were very different.

We were going ahead with our IPO as a Web Services Corporation and OS Systems solution via Openstep 4.2/WOF 4.0/EOF2.x etc.

We had a crap load of IP and unreleased R&D to draw upon.

Steve's $125 Million he took with him from Apple did not become the bulk of the venture capital. That came from Perot and Canon, neither of which were around after 1993 when Hardware ceased.

NeXT was actually profitable for the last couple of years before we were about to announce our IPO.

One of my friends, who initiated the pitch to Hancock [and who gets very little credit in the ball rolling] took a risk and it paid off in spades.

Steve was spending 99.9% of his time at PIXAR because it was a successful Fortune 1000 company with a stock over $50+ per share and a string of successful Movies, long before Disney woke up and worked with Steve after the Merger of NeXT/Apple and his return to Apple full-time.

Several NeXT developers pitched in at PIXAR and later at Apple to develop an array of software tools for PIXAR to use. At NeXT we had quite a large pool of in-house productivity software never released, 3 versions of Openstep and a lot more goodies that we demoed to Amelio and company.

The IBM ThinkPad at MacWorld '97 that Steve demonstrated multiple copies of NEXTTIME running fully pre-emptively was a custom version of Openstep and the same machine I got dumped on my desk at 7pm on Friday with Forstall later ranting and raving nothing had been set up for Avi's demonstration to Amelio and later was used by Steve after Amelio's embarrasingly boring Keynote with that lame Cesna/Powerbook demo.

Myself, Ali Ozer and Mark Bessey [All NeXT/Apple] got unreleased drivers, custom kernel, custom AppKit/Foundation Kit and more on Forstall's desk by 3 am. Fun times. We ordered Pizza, had a small party with the late night bridge club in Engineering and Professional Services/SQA getting it ready.

We all showed up in our NeXT Black shirts to MacWorld to part the sea and everyone watched Steve blow the doors off the crowd and Amelio's presentation.

We all knew right then and there he was going to flip the focus and be 99.9% Apple and .1% PIXAR. He tasted it and wanted back in. Fred Anderson's plan to get Amelio out and Steve in was brilliant.

Instead of a Web Services Corporation we have Apple Inc. 2.0. I'd say the World got a huge bargain that resulted in break-even for all VC, including Steve.
 
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