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Last year, Apple announced a major update for its high-end MacBook Pros, with the new machines featuring a complete redesign, larger mini-LED displays with ProMotion, an HDMI port and SD card slot, full-sized function keys, and more. The new machines contain one of two all-new scaled-up variants of the M1 System on Chip (SoC), the M1 Pro or the M1 Max.


When choosing your MacBook Pro configuration, should you choose the M1 Pro or M1 Max? Despite both being powerful Apple silicon chips with some overlap, they do have different capabilities. Our guide helps to answer the question of how to decide which of these two chipsets for the high-end MacBook Pro is best for you.


Comparing the M1 Pro and M1 Max

The M1 Pro and M1 Max feature the same basic architecture based on the M1 chip, resulting in the same core functionality. Apple lists these identical features of the two SoCs:

Similarities

  • Up to 10-core CPU with eight performance cores and two efficiency cores
  • 16-core Neural Engine
  • Media engine for hardware-accelerated H.264, HEVC, ProRes, and ProRes RAW
  • Video decode engine

Apple's breakdown shows that the two chips share most of their basic features, but they have several differing capabilities.

Differences


M1 Pro
  • Up to 16-core GPU
  • 200GB/s memory bandwidth
  • Support for up to 32GB of unified memory
  • ProRes encode and decode engine
  • Video encode engine


M1 Max

  • Up to 32-core GPU
  • 400GB/s memory bandwidth
  • Support for up to 64GB of unified memory
  • Two ProRes encode and decode engines
  • Two video encode engines


Real-World Performance

Our in-depth tests of the entry-level 14-inch MacBook Pro with an M1 Pro chip and the high-end 16-inch MacBook Pro with an M1 Max chip shows what you're getting with the upgrade to the M1 Max.

Priced at $1,999, the base 14-inch MacBook Pro features an M1 Pro chip with an 8-core CPU, a 14-core GPU, 16GB unified memory, and a 512GB SSD. The $3,499 high-end 16-inch MacBook Pro we compared it to has an M1 Max chip with 10-core CPU, 32-core GPU, 32GB unified memory, and 1TB SSD. The two machines represent the most affordable and the most expensive stock MacBook Pro models that don't take into account upgrade options.

In our testing, the M1 Max unsurprisingly outperformed the lower-end M1 Pro chip, but what was a bit of a surprise was how well even the base M1 Pro chip did in our tests.



In Final Cut Pro, a video export test saw the M1 Max machine export a 6-minute 4K video in one minute and 49 seconds, a task that took the M1 Pro 2 minute and 55 seconds. When it comes to 8K RAW footage, both machines were able to handle the load. The M1 Max MacBook Pro performed close to flawlessly, while the M1 Pro had a few issues with dropped frames and stuttering, but was ultimately able to keep up.

For comparison's sake, the 2017 Mac Pro that we have is not able to handle 8K footage as well as the base model 14-inch MacBook Pro with M1 Pro chip. The M1 Max ultimately did better with our Final Cut Pro testing because of the 32 GPU cores, but the M1 Pro machine offered impressive performance.

In a Blender test, a complicated image of a classroom was rendered in just 8 minutes and 23 seconds on the M1 Max MacBook Pro, a process that took the M1 Pro MacBook Pro 10 minutes and 58 seconds.

We tested the memory in both machines by opening up a series of apps that one might use in a video editing workflow, like Final Cut Pro, Lightroom, Chrome, Safari, Music, and a few others, and there were zero performance hiccups across either MacBook Pro model. Intel machines with 16GB RAM often see issues with this same setup, so again, even the low-end MacBook Pro is doing well here. Both the 512GB SSD in the base model and the 1TB SSD in the 16-inch MacBook Pro performed about the same, with a 128GB file transferri... Click here to read rest of article

Article Link: M1 Pro vs. M1 Max Buyer's Guide
 
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strayts

macrumors regular
Oct 5, 2011
227
337
I honestly don't think I need either of these. The 13" M1 might be enough for me. I was looking to upgrade my 2018 i9 15", but now I'm not so sure. The only intensive tasks I do are photo editing in Lightroom, and that's not super often. I really wish they'd offered the larger screen size with the M1 chip.
 

Cosmosent

macrumors 68020
Apr 20, 2016
2,315
2,693
La Jolla, CA
FYI ...

justTheTable.png
 

laurim

macrumors 68000
Sep 19, 2003
1,985
970
Minnesota USA
I've been waiting for the long-rumored travel-size version of the MacPro because I design and operate high-res (up to 8k) motion graphics for LED walls at live events all over the US and occasionally overseas. Sounding like a tricked out M1 Max would be enough rendering/playing power and multiple high-res monitor outputs all while being even MORE easy to travel with!! Want to see a comparison with the new MacPro. Don’t expect it to be equal but if it’s anywhere close I’m all in!
 

mendicitis

macrumors newbie
Oct 17, 2021
2
52
Honestly most people would be well served by the M1 MBA. And 99% of people would be fine with the Pro Base Model. That said, many more people will buy the Max who will never come close to needing all of that power.

I went with the M1 Pro Base model but upped the ram to 32 and storage to 1TB which is probably overkill. I keep laptops for at least 5 years and that will be just fine for 5 years and maybe even 10.
 

CarpalMac

macrumors 68000
Nov 19, 2012
1,618
3,986
UK
Honestly most people would be well served by the M1 MBA. And 99% of people would be fine with the Pro Base Model. That said, many more people will buy the Max who will never come close to needing all of that power.

I went with the M1 Pro Base model but upped the ram to 32 and storage to 1TB which is probably overkill. I keep laptops for at least 5 years and that will be just fine for 5 years and maybe even 10.

If I was in the market for a computer right now, bar software limitations, I just cannot possibly imagine myself going with anything other than an M1 (or M1 XXX) powered computer right now. They are just in another league performance and power efficiency wise.

My Surface Pro hasn't been switched on since I got my MBA.
 

rs-mac

macrumors member
Sep 29, 2021
31
40
The chips are scaling quite nicely. By the time I'm ready for a new Mac (two years), should have a pretty impressive lineup. Curious to see if they end up with two pro desktop models (iMac Pro replacement plus Mac Pro), or just the Mac Pro.

64 GB is much better, but I'd still want a 128 GB part. On my iMac Pro, I have 128 GB plus 16 GB on the video card (so 144 GB total). Though the RAM is a bit overkill and if there was a 96 GB option, I would have done that.
 

mabhatter

macrumors 65816
Jan 3, 2009
1,022
388
It's worth noting that if you wanted to just upgrade the processor, you can't, you have to take 32GB ram, which is also like 400. So the difference is almost $1000
Correct.
The M1 Pro is only 16GB or 32GB of RAM.
the M1 Max is only 32GB Or 64GB of RAM.

the RAM is built onto the Processor package as a unit, so there's only a minimum number of options.
 

mabhatter

macrumors 65816
Jan 3, 2009
1,022
388
Honestly most people would be well served by the M1 MBA. And 99% of people would be fine with the Pro Base Model. That said, many more people will buy the Max who will never come close to needing all of that power.

I went with the M1 Pro Base model but upped the ram to 32 and storage to 1TB which is probably overkill. I keep laptops for at least 5 years and that will be just fine for 5 years and maybe even 10.
I can't see Apple keeping all those bins of the M1 Pro. Unless they have a lot of fallout on two CPU cores and two GPU cores Apple must be "soft" binning these chips for the lower price points.
The "real" M1 Pro is the 10 CPU/16 GPU/16GB RAM model at the $2499 price point.

we'll have to see if the lower spec M1 Pro has some other thermal/power throttling like the difference between M1 Air and M1 Pro last year.
 

QCassidy352

macrumors G5
Mar 20, 2003
12,028
6,036
Bay Area
In my experience, the top of the line models I've had over the years usually keep their resale slightly better than the other models. For that reason the Max is probably the better choice.
My experience is the opposite. The stock or lightly upgraded models resell better (as a percentage of their original cost, of course) just because the market for the maxed out models is so small. I remember a guy here selling a high end Mac pro during the pandemic and getting a pitiful return. I felt badly for him, but most people buying serious pro computers aren’t buying them second hand.
 

ShiggyMiyamoto

macrumors 6502a
Mar 29, 2004
619
31
Just outside Boston, MA.
I don't do much "pro" work, but I do on occasion cut together a video vlog style or otherwise...(I'm otherwise a content consumer and somewhat traveler, esp since COVID is becoming more manageable more and more lately.) I'm leaning towards the higher spec'd base 14" model (with the M1 Pro, 10 Core CPU, 16 Core GPU and 16 GB RAM). My M1 Mac mini has 16 GB of RAM and I've had very few issues if any at all, so I think I'd be okay with only 16 GB on a 14" M1 Pro? I don't know... What do you guys think?
 
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