Mac Pro 2010 Memory Upgrade: A Story

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by osxabsd, Apr 13, 2011.

  1. osxabsd macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    #1
    Here is my story of upgrading the memory in my Mac Pro 2010 hexa-core system, to help others.

    1. I bought a re-furbished Mac Pro 2010 hexa-core, to save some coin to use for the memory upgrade. It came with 3G RAM. I wanted to upgrade to 16G the listed memory maximum for future proofing (Although it is possible to upgrade to 32G, apparently not indicated by Apple, the cost is significantly more.)

    2. I needed to find a memory vendor. I looked a OWC, but found that a local vendor here in Vancouver (NCIX) was competitive in price (they were a few dollars more, and they only dealt in Kingston products for Macs, but given that I could physically go to their store if there was problems, and it was a Canadian company and so I did not have to worry about an international order, I went with NCIX. Also, I checked, and checked and double-checked to make sure that I was ordering the correct memory - dealing with OWC would have eliminated this paranoia. It is amazing how difficult it is to find a web-site that gives some sort of confirming indication that I was ordering the correct memory. The Kingston site was not too helpful, but third party resellers had indications that I order the correct chips. I had to wait for the order to arrive.

    3. Meanwhile, I got "Rember" for testing my new memory. I ran it against the existing 3G to see what it would produce. The existing 3G tested fine. At the same time I registered my Apple Care before upgrading. The logic behind this was to have Apple Care available to me before I started the upgrade. I read the Mac Pro manual, and watched the OWC video a few times on how to upgrade the memory.

    4. The memory arrived 10 days after I ordered it.

    5. On the day that I installed it I prepared my self. I wanted to ensure that I minimized the potential for static discharge. I used a wood desk. The floor was carpeted, so I put card board down. I was in bare feet.

    6. I made sure I unplugged the computer and brought it to the table. Removing the old memory was easy. I compared the old with the new just to make sure that they looked the same - my last paranoia test. I then grounded myself by touching the computer frame. However, putting the new memory in was physically harder than the OWC video indicated. I pushed the memory in with some effort, trying to ground myself, and not touch the leads on the chips by pushing on the top corner. The memory chips did not seat properly initially, but when I pulled them out and pushed them in, they snapped in. I checked the levers after to make sure the were in the notches and all lined up.

    7. After putting the processor tray back in a cabling it up it was time to power on. And the machine ... powered up! I got the little window indicating that the memory was installed properly. I checked what the operating system had to say, and 16G 1333Mhz were listed. I then ran Rember twice with no problems indicated. (And so I did not fry my machine by putting the wrong memory or rubbed a balloon on my hair and then touched the computer with the balloon.)

    8. I am keeping the original memory. If I ever have to bring it in for servicing, I will put the original memeory back in.

    Now on to installing the new 3T Hitachi hard drive, but that's a different story.:cool:
     
  2. Darien Red Sox macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Location:
    CT, USA
    #2
    I find that it is always best to ground yourself with an ESD wrist strap and work on a ESD mat if possible. After doing it for ~10 without ether of them without a problem I figured that I was pushing my luck.
     
  3. 100Years macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    #3
    Good job with the upgrade --- glad it worked out.... I've actually been planning on doubling-up my RAM as well....
     
  4. dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #4
    Hardly anybody uses things like that and none of them have any problems. Hardware isn't that fragile, you were definitely NOT pushing your luck ;)
     
  5. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #5
  6. Ca$hflow macrumors 6502

    Ca$hflow

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Location:
    London, ON
    #6
    Why don't you just get a whole house humidifier installed on your furnace so you can be comfortable in the winter and have no static electricity.:rolleyes:
     
  7. dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #7
    Exactly. I'd be more worried about other things and solve the problem, not work around it by using esd stuff. Even with a lot of static around you there is little to worry about. When handling the machine you mostly already discharge yourself anyway.
     
  8. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #8
    Whole house humidifier's are germ breeding petri dishes.

    I use a high end humidifier in my bedroom to sleep.
     
  9. FluJunkie macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    #9
    Or you live in an apartment, or rent...
     
  10. Ca$hflow macrumors 6502

    Ca$hflow

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Location:
    London, ON
    #10
  11. Ca$hflow macrumors 6502

    Ca$hflow

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Location:
    London, ON
    #11
    That's why there is a portable humidifier market.
     

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