Mac vs. P.C. Essay

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by cujoca, Sep 25, 2007.

  1. cujoca macrumors regular

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    Jul 24, 2006
    #1
    Hi everyone!

    I am a proud Mac owner and am loving it!
    For my grade 12 English class we have to write a comparative essay about something of our choice, so I chose to do Mac vs. a P.C.
    I know some of the major points of why Macs are better than a PC, but I was just wondering if you could highlight some other points besides the usual no viruses and no pop ups?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Dont Hurt Me macrumors 603

    Dont Hurt Me

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    #2
    Style ,package ,engineering, its all part of it along with a superior OS.
     
  3. Scarlet Fever macrumors 68040

    Scarlet Fever

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    #3
    Mention how easy it is it set up. With an iMac, you just have to take it out of the box, plug in the power, keyboard and mouse, and press the power button. And be sure to finish it with "Once you go Mac, you'll never go back" :D
     
  4. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    #4
    Search for some switchers stories here on the forums. Very insightful.
     
  5. cujoca thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jul 24, 2006
    #5
    those are some great points! I especially like the one, once you go mac you never go back!
     
  6. midtoad macrumors newbie

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    Calgary, Canada
    #6
    other advantages:

    • consistent user experience across all apps (they all look and work the same way)
    • easy to monitor and kill misbehaving apps
    • access to all the linux/BSD command-line tools
    • superior wireless networking (Windows doesn't have the concept of Location)
    • the Apple file-system is more robust than the FAT file-system used by Windows
     
  7. ZeratulsAvenger macrumors newbie

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    Apr 16, 2005
    #7
    One of the things that helps make a good argument, or at least helps people believe what you are saying, is to concede a few points (at least I think so.. if someone says something is the best of the best and tells me why, then they are selling something that I ain't interested in). Don't make Apple a supreme conquering force in the computing world, since they aren't. I love Macs, but you can't just decide something is better or worse, and the general public along with businesses, etc still have more Windows based machines than Macs, so telling them they are wrong for this, that, and another reason doesn't seem helpful.

    How broad are you going? Mac vs. PC, the everyone vs everyone debate, or are you going to focus in on the "general consumer" and discuss the pros/cons for their purposes?

    I have been told that you really can't be to focused with your topic, so I would try something a little more narrow than Mac vs PC for everything.

    What does a normal person do on a computer? Maybe some online games (web-based or small programs, not thinking HL2), store photos, movies, music, and browse the internet? Maybe tax software as well. So is the availability and familiarity there for a PC user that would be switching? Does the switch make sense for what they do (time to relearn what programs they are supposed to use, migrate data over, etc)?

    I'm just trying to give you ideas. I'd shoot for an objective analysis of the two platforms (excluding Linux) and a select market and let the discussion roll. Unless of course it's just a "What I want for Christmas" type essay, where it's purely opinion, in which case you can go Mac-crazy. ;)
     
  8. FF_productions macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

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    #8
    Don't get too technical in this essay.

    Don't talk about UNIX and it's super MACH technology and crap like that.


    Write about the basics, how it is so easy on the surface of things.

    Even include a history lesson on how Microsoft has copied Apple all these years and how they are more successful than Apple (licensing).
     
  9. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    May 21, 2007
    #9
    Your thesis should focus on comparing and contrasting several attributes, as this will give your essay the best structure. For example:

    Macs and PCs are both personal computers meant to make our lives easier, however, several factors, including style, ease of use, design, the operating system, and maintenance burden set the Mac apart as the clearly superior machine.

    Your essay should then outline the points as follows:

    I- Style:
    II- Ease of use:
    III- Design:
    IV-etc

    And don't forget the conclusion!!!!!
    Also, proofread your grammar and spelling. Feel free to PM me if you want me to read it and give feedback:)
     
  10. mrgrieves macrumors newbie

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    Sep 19, 2007
    #10
    Everyone here has been giving one side of the story. Personally I'm a little sick of one sided articles on the matter, one way or the other.

    If I were you I'd give an honest appraisal from both sides.

    Examples of some pro PC points (as I'm sure this forum will have no problem supplying you with the pro apple points):
    -Price (HUGE difference, upwards of for example $500 in the laptops, for equivalent hardware)
    -Availability of software (Not just games, not by a long shot. Look for specialized programs to do any of an infinite variety of obscure things, and you will be hard pressed to find mac OSX equivalents. If your counterpoint is that you can install Windows on a Mac, then add another few hundred bucks to the Apple tax for an XP/Vista license)
    -Possibility of a discoteque inside your computer case (kidding)
    -Having the hilarious dorky guy from The Daily Show represent you rather than the snobby college kid

    I'm out of pros, but honestly there aren't that many aspects to a computer. Price, power, and what you can do on it pretty much cover it all.
     
  11. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    May 21, 2007
    #11
    I'm sorry, but the price difference is no longer that large. Macs are very competitive now; they have been since the Intel switch. The only time when a Mac begins to be expensive is when it's near the end of its product cycle. At that point, they are a bit overpriced.

    Software is easier to find on Windows, but the argument about being able to run both is critical for those who want or need to run both. There are some people who like having both as an option. It doesn't make a Mac any more expensive than a PC, because PCs are incapbable of running OS X.
     
  12. mrgrieves macrumors newbie

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    Sep 19, 2007
    #12
    Same specs as the mid range 15.4" MBP, except for a CPU that is 200 mhz slower. ~$800 price difference

    (This is just what I was able to find within a few minutes)

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16834220182

    PCs can run OSX, and the variety/depth of software available for the PC dwarfs OSX to the point where it can be argued that you can do everything in Windows that you could try to do in OSX, but not the other way around.

    For a random link I just googled on how to install OSX on a PC:

    http://uneasysilence.com/os-x-proven-hacked-and-running-on-an-ordinary-pc/
     
  13. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    May 21, 2007
    #13
    Compare the weight, size, and other options on the laptop, and then determine if they are equals. Plus, that link shows a nearly $1800 notebook. Just how is that $800 less than the base mbp?

    It is physically possible, but not legally, and therin lies all the difference in the world;)
     
  14. mrgrieves macrumors newbie

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    Sep 19, 2007
    #14
    ($1,738.99 after $40.00 Mail-In Rebate)

    So $761 less than the mid range MBP, which is a more fair comparison imo due to the hard drive capacity and video ram.

    As for dimensions
    ASUS:13.9" x 11.2" x 1.5" 6.8 lbs.
    MBP:14.1 by 9.6 by 1.0 inches 5.4 lbs

    As you can see, the Asus is actually smaller in width, considerably larger in (uh, length? not sure if i'd call it length), and only half an inch thicker, while being 1.4 lbs heavier.

    I'll leave it up to debate as to whether those differences warrant the price gap, but I feel that most consumers wouldn't agree that they do.


    I don't know of any legal restrictions against installing OSX on a non apple machine, but if they exist, then =[, I believe you can still perform all activities on Windows software.
     
  15. contoursvt macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 22, 2005
    #15
    I'm sure there are plenty of mac users who have tried a "special version" of XP in their computers. I'm confident that not all have gone out to purchase licenses.

    Having said this, you are right, its not legal in any shape or form to have OSX on a PC but it can be technically done - painful but possible. Now as far as XP and Vista on a mac....fans dont run well in Windows and must be set wth SMC fan control within OSX which may be a bit of a pain so I dont see XP or Vista being perfect on a Mac. You also cannot run Windows only without OSX on the machine because the fans cannot be set therefore there is a much easier chance to run into probs since the fans are not properly controlled.

    Pros for Mac
    -stylish
    -niche market (imac - all in one type machine or mini). While they are available on the PC side, they are not as well done
    -OSX if thats what you prefer
    -Competetive pricing if you're dealing with the Mac Pro vs HP / Dell workstation class machines.


    Cons
    -overpriced for entry and middle market segment
    -less availability of hardware that are compatible (with OSX at least)
    -some software not available and in general less options for software. Some argue that software is of higher quality but still, users need to try and choose. Maybe the crappy one is what someone actually likes
    -locked in for service and repairs. If your motherboard goes, you're at Apple's mercy and will have to pay huge. Leaky G5's anyone?
     
  16. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    #16
    It seems that the notebook you linked to is a 13.3". Yet, it's weight is a full 1.4lbs heavier. That to many people is a deal breaker. Did you ever wonder why many people pay out more than $2000 for lighter notebooks? It makes them easier to carry around. I wouldn't pay $1800 for a nearly 7lb notebook. That doesn't say "portable" to me;) Then again, there are a few people who would buy one, but it's not in the same class as the mbp. Now Sony Vaios and Thinkpads are probably a better comparison to the mbp, because they have similar specs in terms of power, weight, and features. Compare the prices on those notebooks, and you will see that there isn't much of a difference.

    OS X is explicitly stated to be Mac only. Read the software license again. It's very clear.
     
  17. mrgrieves macrumors newbie

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    Sep 19, 2007
    #17
    ASUS G Series G1S-A1 NoteBook Intel Core 2 Duo T7500(2.20GHz) 15.4" Wide SXGA+ 2GB DDR2 667 160GB 5400rpm DVD Super Multi NVIDIA GeForce 8600M GT - Retail

    People willing to pay $2000 more for a lighter laptop with the same hardware capabilities are, by far, a minority.

    An essay like this should probably be tailored towards the average user, at least in terms of likely budgets.

    For most people I know, and mind you the majority of people are not well paid professionals, even $2000+ is too much to spend on a computer.

    In this case, for value, versatility, and power, I believe the PC is still king.

    With all that said, I plan to switch to a 17" high res MBP within the next few weeks (my first mac), but I fully admit that my purchase is almost entirely motivated by aesthetics. =p
     
  18. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

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    #18
    Whoops, sorry. It's getting late:eek:

    They always will be. However, their demands are usually correlated to lighter, smaller, and more powerful.
    Value is very different from lowest price. Sure, a PC vendor can supply you with a cheap workable computer, but it won't have good value. The mid range white macbook is probably one of the best value machines out there. It's powerful, will last a long time, and has good features for its price. Remember, value doesn't always correlate with lowest price.
     
  19. mrgrieves macrumors newbie

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    Sep 19, 2007
    #19
    Value, by definition, must correlate with price. A bentley for $1,000,000,000 is a much poorer value than a Toyota Camry for $20.

    Value will be a formula taking into account PRIMARILY resources invested, then work saved. Longevity isn't an issue as it's just a factor of work saved (ex: you have a computer that is twice as fast as another computer that lasts twice as long, both cost the same and are used at maximum capacity for their entire lifespan, they both had the same value).

    Of course, convenience will factor into the work formula, but such a miniscule difference in dimensions and weight will not be a big factor, especially not for the majority of consumers.

    It's of no use to discuss these sorts of issues from the point of an elite few, if we were, we could argue that Alienwares/Voodoos are the way to go as they are supercomputers compared to anything else.
     
  20. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    #20
    They only correlate with respect to cost of ownership, not in initial outlay.
    Let's use an example using non-computer merchandise.

    Say, for example, you go out and look at cars. You've narrowed your choice down between a Ford Focus and a Honda Civic. The Ford Focus has an asking price of about $12,500, while the Civic has an asking price of $15,000. Let's assume all things are equal (ie, all other features except quality are the same; gas mileage, options, etc). Now, standard tests done by JD Power and Associates shows us that the Ford Focus lasts about 6 years without having any major problems, while the Civic lasts about 10 years before having any major problems. Now let's do a little math:

    Ford Focus: $12,500/6=$2,083.33 per year of ownership before problems arise.

    Civic: $15,000/10=$1,500 per year of ownership before problems.

    Now, if we were to take the simplistic view and say that each car will last twice as long as it's first problem, we get:

    Ford Focus: $12,500/12=$1041.67 for each year of ownership.

    Civic: $15,000/20=$750 for each year of ownership.

    Clearly, the Civic offers a better value because it costs less to own (ignoring other maintenance for argument's sake). In the long run, the Civic will be a better buy because it is a superior car.

    Now, aside from Apple's recent QA problems, Apple has historically made good quality products. At the very least, the OS is supported on computers that are decently old, and those older machines are still quite capable (as many veteran members will tell you about their iBooks and Powerbooks). Just as with the car example, the Mac will provide a better value because it will cost less over the course of several years. The initial outlay is higher, but the cost of ownership is not.

    The same is true if you go to a warehouse store. It is more expensive in outright terms to buy a whole crate of cereal, but over the long run (as you consume the cereal) it is cheaper, and hence, a better value.

    As I said before, those who need/want smaller and lighter notebooks will tell you that the one you linked to is too large and heavy. When a notebook crosses the $1500 mark, demands from consumers are quite high. Obviously the mbp is meeting a lot of those demands, because it's selling quite well.

    Yes, these are important to value too. What the product can do for you over another product is an important measure of value.

    Meanwhile, the OP has several talking points to work with now (which was the original topic:eek::)).
     
  21. elppa macrumors 68040

    elppa

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    #21
    Edited for accuracy.
     
  22. JMax1 macrumors 6502

    JMax1

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    #23
    Don't forget to point out that on a Mac you can run Windows (Bootcamp, Parallels, etc) for all your Windows needs, but a PC won't run OSX and peripherals.
     
  23. Pressure macrumors 68040

    Pressure

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    #24
    Remember to list the advantages of both "religions", it will make you look less biased and make it seem well thought out.

    The general way to provide feedback is first to discuss the "sore" points of both systems (the negative things) and end up by showing the positive sides of them.

    They both have their shortcomings and advantages.
     
  24. GSMiller macrumors 68000

    GSMiller

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    #25
    A big plus for me is Apple makes the hardware. Not so much the individual components (such as RAM and hard drives) but they assemble the computers themselves so the hardware works flawlessly with the operating system. Even Windows runs better on a Mac :)
     

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