MacBook Pro 2013 model 32GB possible?

zeblazed

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 25, 2014
10
0
I would appreciate some advice

Is it possible to upgrade a Macbook pro to 32 GB of ram?

The specs I have currently are



I understand that my ram is soldered to the motherboard but I can't currently afford to get a Mac Pro Desktop because the one I need is around 5k so upgrading my ram would be the best viable option for me.

I found these dimm's would they be compatible with my MBP?

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/969215-REG/crucial_16gb_204p_sodimm_pc3_12800.html
 

zeblazed

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 25, 2014
10
0
How would you go about removing the current chips and replacing them with larger ones?
I wouldn't per say. I would most likely hire someone who specializes in doing so. But can it be done?
 

JHUFrank

macrumors 6502a
Apr 16, 2010
645
54
Negative. RAM in the rMBP models isn't upgradable, not even by Apple. There is a possibility that a vendor will come out with a hard drive upgrade in the near future, but RAM is soldered to the mainboard.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
It can be done, but the cost in doing so is near what a new machine would cost and generally not worth it. There's also the risk of damaging the logicboard or having the replacement ram chips not fitting within the very tight design and operational tolerances of the OEM chips.
 

MCAsan

macrumors 601
Jul 9, 2012
4,526
410
Atlanta
There are no memory SIMM/DIMM slots. As you already said, memory is soldered in from the factory. 16GB is max.


What is wrong with a 2012 Mac Pro 5,1 with 8 or more cores that you can load up with tons of memory? Those should be available on ebay.
 

JHUFrank

macrumors 6502a
Apr 16, 2010
645
54
I want the link where it has been done :) Hypothetically doesn't count. Hypothetically I can create a moon rocket out of wood. ;)

It can be done, but the cost in doing so is near what a new machine would cost and generally not worth it. There's also the risk of damaging the logicboard or having the replacement ram chips not fitting within the very tight design and operational tolerances of the OEM chips.
 

MCAsan

macrumors 601
Jul 9, 2012
4,526
410
Atlanta
A 3.5GHz 27" iMac is more powerful than any Macbook, and you can put at least 32GB in it from Apple.
 

T5BRICK

macrumors G3
Aug 3, 2006
8,086
2,055
Oregon
I wouldn't per say. I would most likely hire someone who specializes in doing so. But can it be done?
No, the RAM chips themselves are soldered onto the logic board. Having someone unsolder the chips and replace them with higher capacity chips would cost a LOT more than you'd think. Additionally you'd void your warranty and possibly create an unstable computer.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
It hasn't been done to a retina Macbook Pro yet. But it has been done to an Apple TV 1G that also has soldered ram. The person soldered an extra four or eight, I don't remember, ram chips onto the blank pads on the logicboard and the Apple TV saw and used 512MB of ram, up from the OEM default of 256MB. I'm unable to locate the link for it right now, but it was a fascinating read with pictures.
 

zeblazed

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 25, 2014
10
0
Negative. RAM in the rMBP models isn't upgradable, not even by Apple. There is a possibility that a vendor will come out with a hard drive upgrade in the near future, but RAM is soldered to the mainboard.
What does the r stand for in MBP?

Yes I've called Apple multiple times and they kept saying no it isn't possible.

But why? doesn't that stop innovation?

I'm completely fine with my current hard drive space. All I need is more ram.
 

T5BRICK

macrumors G3
Aug 3, 2006
8,086
2,055
Oregon
I want the link where it has been done :) Hypothetically doesn't count. Hypothetically I can create a moon rocket out of wood. ;)
The CPU supports 32GB of RAM. Someone with the ability to remove and replace the BGAs would be able to swap them out. It wouldn't be cheap and it's risky.

----------

What does the r stand for in MBP?
Retina

Yes I've called Apple multiple times and they kept saying no it isn't possible.

But why? doesn't that stop innovation?

I'm completely fine with my current hard drive space. All I need is more ram.
There are no RAM slots in the computer. You can't remove the RAM that the computer includes without special tools and experience.
 

zeblazed

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Aug 25, 2014
10
0
Damn I'm in a corner then..

I guess the best option for me would be to sell it and save up for a Mac Pro 2014 Desktop.

Was afraid It would have to come to that. I really would rather upgrade my rMBP and pay the price

Can anyone give me a quote or is that out of the question.
 

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,682
2,103
27" Imac for you

Sell it and use the money to buy a refurbed 2013 top end imac that'll take 32gb of ram and will out perform your macbook in every area other than the screen (but the size is much better). Make sure you get one with ssd or fusion though.
 

simonsi

macrumors 601
Jan 3, 2014
4,849
716
Auckland
Run Mavericks, with its RAM compression you will have near 16GB addressable space without the hassle of building an MBP that Apple doesn't build.

As an example, my 8GB MBP can easily support 14GB with compression before starting to swap.
 

5to1

macrumors 6502
Mar 9, 2008
302
48
It hasn't been done to a retina Macbook Pro yet. But it has been done to an Apple TV 1G that also has soldered ram. The person soldered an extra four or eight, I don't remember, ram chips onto the blank pads on the logicboard and the Apple TV saw and used 512MB of ram, up from the OEM default of 256MB. I'm unable to locate the link for it right now, but it was a fascinating read with pictures.
The two aren't really comparable. When you have free pads to play with and a smaller less complex board, free hand rework is possible.

With a large complex logic board, BGA chips/etc you will find you will need to raise the temp of the entire board considerably. Before you do this you'll have to remove any components/plastics/etc that can't survive this base temp. You'll also have to ensure everything is kept very stable as obviously joints become less stable, even if the solder is still below reflow temp. You then need to heat the component to be removed, ball up the new component, clean up the pads and place the new component. Very careful local and overall temp control is imperative, in other words it can't be done by hand and needs an expensive rework machine/etc.

If you tried to do it without such equipment, you'd find the board would suck away the heat preventing the solder from melting. I've seen people try to rework such boards and scratch their heads why they can't get the component off or worse still pull a few pads off :(

Even if you find someone who is able to do it, it will be at your own risk and thats because there is a good chance the board will be toast by the end of the process. Generally complex boards are reworked using prep instructions from the manufacturer, who has intimate knowledge of the the entire board and optimal rework temps. Or third parties mess with worthless boards to perfect a specific repair, for example the dGPU repairs.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
The two aren't really comparable. When you have free pads to play with and a smaller less complex board, free hand rework is possible.

With a large complex logic board, BGA chips/etc you will find you will need to raise the temp of the entire board considerably. Before you do this you'll have to remove any components/plastics/etc that can't survive this base temp. You'll also have to ensure everything is kept very stable as obviously joints become less stable, even if the solder is still below reflow temp. You then need to heat the component to be removed, ball up the new component, clean up the pads and place the new component. Very careful local and overall temp control is imperative, in other words it can't be done by hand and needs an expensive rework machine/etc.

If you tried to do it without such equipment, you'd find the board would suck away the heat preventing the solder from melting. I've seen people try to rework such boards and scratch their heads why they can't get the component off or worse still pull a few pads off :(

Even if you find someone who is able to do it, it will be at your own risk and thats because there is a good chance the board will be toast by the end of the process. Generally complex boards are reworked using prep instructions from the manufacturer, who has intimate knowledge of the the entire board and optimal rework temps. Or third parties mess with worthless boards to perfect a specific repair, for example the dGPU repairs.
It's the most comparable thing at this time. For another thing that may be more comparable, is a person who took a CoreDuo Macbook1,1 and upgraded it to a Core2Duo. Of course he was skilled at doing that as it was his profession.
 

ABC5S

Suspended
Sep 10, 2013
3,395
1,597
Florida
Why would you want to OP? 16 GB is more than enough for VM and other intensive work, and 4 GB for those that do many normal tasks have no issues.
 

poematik13

macrumors 6502a
Jun 5, 2014
727
298
The 2015 Broadwell MBP will probably have an option for 32GB of ram.

16GB modules of DDR3 for notebooks dont exist, you can only get 8's
 

kappaknight

macrumors 68000
Mar 5, 2009
1,576
71
Atlanta, GA
What does the r stand for in MBP?



Yes I've called Apple multiple times and they kept saying no it isn't possible.



But why? doesn't that stop innovation?



I'm completely fine with my current hard drive space. All I need is more ram.

Limiting RAM doesn't necessarily stop innovation. It saves money and forces developer to write better code. We used to do so much with much less just 25 years ago.
 

jorgk

macrumors member
Mar 20, 2013
88
5
16 Gigabyte DDR3 on a single module

16GB modules of DDR3 for notebooks dont exist, you can only get 8's

That not true any more, see here.

However, I remember that because of the current BIOS (or firmware or whatever ...), they cannot be used in cMBP (or similar Macs that have exchangeable RAM bays), as to some message somewhere to find … (sorry, can't remember where I read that, apart from that I did indeed read it).


Found back that thread: Here.
Anyhow, this doesn't help the OP either.
 
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