Macbook pro retina Turbo Boost function working?

keviig

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 7, 2012
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I have the base model 2,3 GHz Macbook pro Retina running the GM build of ML. I decided to try and put the CPU at 100% load by using the "yes > /dev/null" (1 for each core) command in Terminal to see if it triggered the Turbo Boost function, which should've brought it up to 3,3 GHz. Thing is, even at 100% load for minutes it would (according to the Ministat widget) not go anywhere above the normal 2.3 GHz. (see the attached screenshot) I wasn't able to trigger the Turbo Boost function by any other means either.

Is the widget lying to me or is this an actual issue with the Macbook Pro Retina?
 

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jav6454

macrumors P6
Nov 14, 2007
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Remember, Turbo Boost only works when the CPU is trying to execute a single threaded action quickly.

In other words, the other 3 cores of the CPU will "shut off" temporarily in order to boost the single working core to a higher clock rate.

If you want to see this happening try using a single thread load.
 

keviig

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 7, 2012
498
225
Remember, Turbo Boost only works when the CPU is trying to execute a single threaded action quickly.

In other words, the other 3 cores of the CPU will "shut off" temporarily in order to boost the single working core to a higher clock rate.

If you want to see this happening try using a single thread load.
Allright, did not know that. However, i just tried exporting a movie from iMovie, which only uses 1 core, and still no luck.
 

terraphantm

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Jun 27, 2009
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Remember, Turbo Boost only works when the CPU is trying to execute a single threaded action quickly.

In other words, the other 3 cores of the CPU will "shut off" temporarily in order to boost the single working core to a higher clock rate.

If you want to see this happening try using a single thread load.
I don't think that's true, because Intel has turbo boost frequencies defined for 1,2, 3, and 4 cores. This is the list for desktops:http://www.intel.com/support/processors/corei7/sb/CS-032279.htm?wapkw=core+i7+table

I cannot find a similar list for notebooks, but I think you can get the information within the OS itself.
 

keviig

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 7, 2012
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Me think iMovie was updated with Grand Central taken into account which means multi-threaded performance.
You sure? It won't go over 25% load when exporting movies, which would be odd if it was using all the cores.
 

jav6454

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Nov 14, 2007
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I don't think that's true, because Intel has turbo boost frequencies defined for 1,2, 3, and 4 cores. This is the list for desktops:http://www.intel.com/support/processors/corei7/sb/CS-032279.htm?wapkw=core+i7+table

I cannot find a similar list for notebooks, but I think you can get the information within the OS itself.
Yes there is turbo boosting for 3, 2 and 1 core. But at 4 cores enabled, it is hard since all power is equally distributed. Remember, Turbo Boost works because with a core shutting down, the power used by that core is redirected to the other cores and hence a speed bump is gained.


You sure? It won't go over 25% load when exporting movies, which would be odd if it was using all the cores.
Encoding/Decoding is still a CPU intensive task...
 

charlieroberts

macrumors 6502a
Feb 5, 2007
590
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Im guessing the widget only reads which processor you have on your machine, it doesn't give a real time reading on the frequency.

I don't think you can get that on a mac. Maybe try windows
 

imladris

macrumors member
Aug 3, 2011
35
2
You could try Intel's MacCPUID to see which frequency the CPU is running at. In the application there is a "recalculate" button that I guess can be used to check if the frequency has changed (it doesn't do it in real-time). I don't have any frequency stepping on my computer so I can't test it.
 

theSeb

macrumors 604
Aug 10, 2010
6,963
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Poole, England
You could try Intel's MacCPUID to see which frequency the CPU is running at. In the application there is a "recalculate" button that I guess can be used to check if the frequency has changed (it doesn't do it in real-time). I don't have any frequency stepping on my computer so I can't test it.
Unfortunately that app does not show the actual frequency. It only shows the base frequency.

You can check if turbo boost is enabled without installing Windows. Open the Console.app (in utitilies) and then click on All Message. In the search box type in "AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement"

Look for a line that says:

11/07/2012 21:50:47.000 kernel: AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement: Turbo Ratios 889A
(This is from my rMBP)

Depending on the computer, the ratios will be different. For example my 2011 MBA has 008B

The way you read this is turbo boost on 4 cores/3 cores/2 cores/1 core

So on the MBA... the first two zeros make sense, since it only has two cores. The numbers are hex and you times them by 100 MHz. Therefore the MBA has 800 MHz turbo boost enabled on 2 cores and 1100 MHz on one core (B = 11 * 100 = 1100 MHz). Effectively this means that the MBA is running at 2.6 GHz turbo boost on two cores and 2.9 GHz turbo boost on 1 core, which matches Intel's specifications.

The rMBP 2.6 has 800 MHz on 4 cores, 800 MHz on 3 cores, 900 MHz on 2 cores and 1000 MHz on 1 core.

So it's 3.4 /3.4/ 3.5/3.6 on 4/3/2/1 core(s) respectively. This again matches Intel's specifications. If I recall correctly, the last time Apple released computers which had CPUs with disabled features was in 2010. I am glad that they've stopped playing these games.
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
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The core temp has to be right too it's a combination of factors.
 

terraphantm

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Jun 27, 2009
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507
Pennsylvania
Yes there is turbo boosting for 3, 2 and 1 core. But at 4 cores enabled, it is hard since all power is equally distributed. Remember, Turbo Boost works because with a core shutting down, the power used by that core is redirected to the other cores and hence a speed bump is gained.




Encoding/Decoding is still a CPU intensive task...
No, I mean there are different frequencies depending on how many cores are being used. But turbo boost functions even when all 4 cores are in use. Intel's FAQ on it says as much. It is not limited to single threaded applications.

Anandtech's review has the frequencies listed. I think it's 3.6 GHz with 1 core being used, 3.5 for 2 cores, 3.4 for 3 cores and 4 cores are active. For the 2.6GHz processor that is.

Intel is calling this "Turbo boost 2.0". Perhaps the original version functioned in the manner you're talking about.
 

jav6454

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Nov 14, 2007
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No, I mean there are different frequencies depending on how many cores are being used. But turbo boost functions even when all 4 cores are in use. Intel's FAQ on it says as much. It is not limited to single threaded applications.

Anandtech's review has the frequencies listed. I think it's 3.6 GHz with 1 core being used, 3.5 for 2 cores, 3.4 for 3 cores and 4 cores are active. For the 2.6GHz processor that is.

Intel is calling this "Turbo boost 2.0". Perhaps the original version functioned in the manner you're talking about.
Yes, perhaps that is what I am thinking about. When Turbo Boost came out this is how it was explained.

However, if the block increases of frequencies are like this, then good going. I stand corrected.
 

c-bass

macrumors newbie
Jul 22, 2012
1
0
how to turbo boost rmbp?

I'm just wondering how to enable turbo boost for my rmbp?
 

TickleMeElmo

macrumors regular
Jun 19, 2012
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0
Remember, Turbo Boost only works when the CPU is trying to execute a single threaded action quickly.

In other words, the other 3 cores of the CPU will "shut off" temporarily in order to boost the single working core to a higher clock rate.

If you want to see this happening try using a single thread load.
Turbo boost functionality never involved putting the other cores in idle states or power gating them. It has always been the processor boosting frequencies while trying to stay within a specified TDP (in this case 45W)
 

jav6454

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Nov 14, 2007
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Turbo boost functionality never involved putting the other cores in idle states or power gating them. It has always been the processor boosting frequencies while trying to stay within a specified TDP (in this case 45W)
That is essentially what it is in the early days... re-read again please. Why do you think Anandtech did a whole article on clever silicone techniques that could successfully power gate cores when idle and prevent power loss.
 

polygaryd

macrumors newbie
Nov 8, 2015
1
0
running el capitan, i have a 3337u processor and my turbo ratios are showing as 0079. That doesnt seem right when the processor should be 1.8ghz normal and turbo up to 2.7ghz or am i not understanding how to figure out the turbo frequencies from the 0079 numbers?