macOS update with non-flashed GTX-1080ti????

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by rmt37, May 15, 2017.

  1. rmt37 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #1
    I just got caught in a bad place.

    I installed a new GTX-1080ti a couple of weeks ago and I'm very pleased with it. It's multiple times faster than the flashed GTX-680 that it replaced.

    Today, I saw a new update on the Apple store, so I decided to update. I should have thought about it a little longer before I did that.

    After the update, macOS reverted to the native macOS video drivers, as there are no compatible nVidia drivers for the current build. This resulted in a non-working 1080 card.

    Fortunately, I still have the 680. I don't have room in my 5.1 to run both cards, so I had to physically remove the 1080 and re-install the 680. Looks like I will have to run the 680 until a new driver is released by nVidia.

    Two questions:
    1) This seems like a chicken/egg problem for non-flashed nVidia cards. Even if a new nVidia driver is available, I can't install an nVidia update until I've installed a new macOS update. So, if I don't have the 1080 flashed, I will always have to swap cards whenever I want to update macOS to the latest build. Is that a true assumption?
    2) I flashed my 680 when I first bought it. It was an easy process. I'm not keen on shipping my new 1080 card and having to wait for it to get back. I can't imagine it's rocket science. Is there a way for me to flash it myself? I don't mind paying a license fee to whomever developed the new bios code. I'm a bit peeved that I've got to pay UPS shipping + labor on top of the license fee on top of buying the card in the first place.
     
  2. Gazember macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2017
    #2
    Unlike the 680, the required ROM changes for the 1080 are not in the public domain. You have to pay MacVidCards to flash it for you.
     
  3. rmt37 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #3
    What about question #1? I have a mac-mini in another part of the house. Could I remote into the Mac Pro after a macOS update has been applied and install the nVidia drivers remotely?
     
  4. MisterAndrew macrumors 6502

    MisterAndrew

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2015
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #4
    The nVidia web driver 378.05.05.05f02 is not compatible with MacOS Sierra 10.12.5. It just popped up a dialog for me saying that after I updated (I'm using an Apple/ATI HD 5870, but I have the nVidia web driver installed). So you're out of luck. You'll need to restore back to 10.12.4 from your latest backup.
     
  5. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #5
    In most cases you can do screen sharing, assuming that you have properly prepared the computer ahead of time, and you follow the update procedure correctly and exactly. However that is not a 100% solution since there are scenarios where the OS won't finish booting. And if it doesn't finish booting, you also cannot screen share, and so you'll still need the other card as a backup.
     
  6. rmt37 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #6
    Not a newbie here. Yes, I realize what I would need to do if I wanted to keep using the 1080 today. But what I'm after are the future scenarios. What do I do the next time? I know I'll wait until the new nVidia are available after a new macOS release. But what is the best way to apply the macOS fixes if I don't want to swap video cards?
    --- Post Merged, May 15, 2017 ---
    That makes sense. total PIA. I wish nVidia would step up to the plate and offer a flashable bios. They are restricting their own market by single threading everyone through a sole, aftermarket bios flash provider.
     
  7. ActionableMango, May 15, 2017
    Last edited: May 15, 2017

    ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #7
    I understand, yes.

    You might consider a few of things, (1) if you flash the 1080ti you can sell the 680 instead of keeping it as a backup, which will get you around $150-$200. (2) Some day when you sell the 1080ti you will recoup more money than you would for a straight PC card, I think at least a $50 difference.

    Given that 1 and 2 put $200-$250 back in your pocket, the flash's "Total Cost of Ownership" is not anywhere near as high as it seems. In fact, it's pretty close to zero. The extra functionality, convenience, and piece of mind were well worth it to me.
     
  8. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #8
    @Synchro3 wrote a procedure for getting the Nvidia installer to ignore all requirements:
    https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...k-nvidia-drivers.1853748/page-5#post-20878271

    In theory you could download the new Nvidia driver and install it before installing the MacOS update, then after reboot both the driver and MacOS would be matching versions.

    But I say "in theory" because I have not tried this personally as I've always had cards with Mac EFI.
     
  9. MisterAndrew macrumors 6502

    MisterAndrew

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2015
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon
    #9
    Apparently, you can modify the driver so it works in 10.12.5. I apologize for the misinformation. I'm a newb with the web drivers. :) I would take the drive out and boot from it in an external enclosure with your Mac mini, modify the driver, and then put it back. Or you could probably boot from it with it still inside your Mac Pro from your Mac mini using Target Disk Mode over Firewire.

    https://forums.macrumors.com/thread...re-compatibility.2045795/page-4#post-24580403
     
  10. Fl0r!an macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    #10
    I don't think Nvidia cares that much about classic Mac Pro users, as they'd have to make an official "Mac Edition" GPU. Publishing just the ROM would be difficult as most cards are going to need a custom one (to reflect port layout, core/memory clocks, fan profile, etc...).

    I'm quite sure that the Hackintosh install base is a lot bigger by now, and they don't need any special EFI ROMs...
     
  11. Cindori macrumors 68040

    Cindori

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Location:
    Sweden
    #11
    Flashing the card does not make it work in macOS. It simply gives you the gray boot screen.

    You're asking whether you can Install nVidia drivers before you reboot. Yes. Instead of downloading macOS updates through the App Store, you download the Combo Update .pkg from Apples website. Since it is a .pkg, you can still use macOS while it's installing, and install your nVidia driver before pressing the "Reboot" button at the end.
     
  12. Fl0r!an macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    #12
    Well it does, just without any 3D acceleration. OS X will utilize the EFI video driver, allowing you to install the Nvidia WebDriver without any tricks.
     
  13. Synchro3 macrumors 65816

    Synchro3

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2014
    #13
    I must point out that this procedure was for older Nvidia web drivers, for OS X 10.8 and 10.9, to bypass the installer restrictions, in order to install the drivers to another Mac than the Mac Pro, especially for eGPU use.

    Newer Nvidia web drivers don't need this procedure anymore. One can install the drivers on any Mac.

    Other issue: If you want to install Nvidia web driver to a non-matching OS X system, you have to edit the build number: https://www.tonymacx86.com/threads/...drivers-only-work-with-1.205881/#post-1359039
     
  14. theitsage macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    #14
    Can we use Software Update Tool via Terminal? This is the current workaround for Polaris 10 GPU to prevent a forced restart when upgrading through the App Store. Instead of doing kext edits for AMD cards, you can download and run newest and compatible Nvidia web drivers.

    [sudo softwareupdate -i -a]
     
  15. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #15
    I don't think it's that simple.

    The ideal procedure will be as follow.

    1) use terminal to update the OS

    2) install Nvidia web driver

    3) reboot

    However, step 2 is not the simple. When you install the OS update from terminal, the system files changed. However, the operating OS version is still the old OS. That means, when you want to install the new Nvidia web driver. It won't let you install, because the OS version doesn't match. So, you can either reboot, let the running OS become the correct version (which make the terminal update totally meaningless). Or mod the Nvidia web driver installer to make it able to install on a "wrong" OS.

    TBH, compare to black screen. I prefer to mod the Nvidia installer.
     
  16. theitsage macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    #16
    I've done the software update through Terminal and new Mac OS version reflected without a reboot.
     
  17. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #17
    Interesting, good to know that. Then I really wonder why no one go through this route with the Nvidia card.
     

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