Maximizing Windows? How could Apple miss this?

MarkF786

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 21, 2006
36
0
I'm a convert to Mac OS X and though I love the OS, their's one major flaw; when I hit the "zoom" green button, the window does not maximize like on Windows. Instead, it seems to only maximize top-to-bottom, not side-to-side. When I maximize a window, I want it to fill the entire screen. The problem seems to exist with all applications I've tried.

Is there a trick or fix for this? It's quite annoying having to manual resize a window to fill the screen every time I open an application.

Thanks!

Mark
 

bill4588

macrumors 6502a
Feb 2, 2006
588
0
Kennesaw, GA
there's not a fix that i know of. but after a while i started to enjoy not having the window maximized. I like seeing all my open apps on the screen.
 

someguy

macrumors 68020
Dec 4, 2005
2,315
8
Still here.
I never understood the need to "maximize" a window. As long as it is big enough for what's inside it (or what it's being used for), that's all the space it should need to take up.

The green button is for this purpose, I believe. Meant to resize the window to fit its contents.
 

atszyman

macrumors 68020
Sep 16, 2003
2,437
1
The Dallas 'burbs
This is the intended behavior for Macs. In Windows the main reason I see to maximize a window is that then only that application's menus are visible. I've often clicked on the wrong menus because I don't often maximize Windows even when using XP. However since the Mac puts the active application menus at the top of the screen regardless of which applications are visible maximizing does little to avoid this confusion since that is taken care of by only having one applications menus visible at a time.

I myself prefer not to maximize windows so I can quickly move to another open app by just clicking on whichever corner of the window is visible.
 

Eidorian

macrumors Penryn
Mar 23, 2005
29,080
287
Indianapolis
Maximizing = Doing it Wrong

I find it's only useful for video. Otherwise you lose a lot of screen space due to ONE program taking up the ENTIRE screen.
 

7on

macrumors 601
Nov 9, 2003
4,940
0
Dress Rosa
someguy said:
I never understood the need to "maximize" a window. As long as it is big enough for what's inside it (or what it's being used for), that's all the space it should need to take up.

The green button is for this purpose, I believe. Meant to resize the window to fit its contents.
yeah, why someone would want +3" of white on either side of a website is beyond reason. If you like wasting 6" of screen then you can drag the lower right hand corner of windows.
 

MacBoobsPro

macrumors 603
Jan 10, 2006
5,115
6
7on said:
yeah, why someone would want +3" of white on either side of a website is beyond reason. If you like wasting 6" of screen then you can drag the lower right hand corner of windows.
I bet hes got a 30" ACD too :D
 

Butters

macrumors 6502
Jan 7, 2006
256
0
UK
I agree that maximizing is kinda pointless

but I do know of a fix for Safari.

Make a new bookmark, give it a name like "Maximize" or "+" and the url "javascript:self.moveTo(0,0);self.resizeTo(screen.availWidth,screen.availHeight);"

then whenever you visit that bookmark all do will be is maximize the window, nothing more, nothing less.
 

rvernout

macrumors member
Jun 23, 2003
57
0
Amsterdam
someguy said:
I never understood the need to "maximize" a window. As long as it is big enough for what's inside it (or what it's being used for), that's all the space it should need to take up.

The green button is for this purpose, I believe. Meant to resize the window to fit its contents.
I mainly agree, but options are good. It would be nice if you were able to maximize to full screen regardless of the content of the window. Something like [apple] click the green button.
 

CommonMan

macrumors regular
Sep 27, 2006
140
0
Midwest
Limits

ya, I am finding it odd that maximizing does not fill up the whole screen. Maybe this is so you can see the other windows? I'm new to the apple operating system and I'm just now learning the ropes.
 

MarkF786

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 21, 2006
36
0
I have a MacBook which doesn't have a lot of screen real-estate, IMHO. If I'm working on only one app, I prefer to have it fill the screen. Also, many programs will utilize the larger window when you expand it (a word processor, for example).

NOT maximizing the window for me is like having overlapping TV channels, none of them filling the screen. And if you were watching a wide-screen movie, would you like to see the last channel you were watching on top and the bottom rather than the black bars? It's a distraction! :eek:

Mark
 

2nyRiggz

macrumors 603
Aug 20, 2005
6,159
66
Thank you Jah...I'm so Blessed
I see no need for max window when half of it is not being used fully. Using apps like word and etc..still feels like wasted space when maxed.

If you want that window max then drag it to the desired size.



Bless
 

QuarterSwede

macrumors G3
Oct 1, 2005
9,164
1,129
Colorado Springs, CO
CommonMan said:
ya, I am finding it odd that maximizing does not fill up the whole screen. Maybe this is so you can see the other windows? I'm new to the apple operating system and I'm just now learning the ropes.
Thats because you are used to how Windows works. In OS X the green button isn't a maximize button, its called zoom and that's exactly what it does. Now that I use OS X I rarely have wanted to maximize a window. The reason non maximized windows suck in Windows is because the windows have no depth (no shadow) so it makes it hard to look at. But in OS X the windows do have depth so you are looking at an object that is above the desktop like in life.

... if you were watching a wide-screen movie, would you like to see the last channel you were watching on top and the bottom rather than the black bars? It's a distraction!
Sounds like you have a focusing problem. Seeing the desktop behind this (Safari) window doesn't bother me. In fact, I don't even notice it because my mind ignores it and I focus on the window in front of me.
 

Tymmz

macrumors 65816
Jan 6, 2005
1,430
157
It's called Windows, but a lot of people maximize the windows, that means, there is something wrong with Window(s) not OS X.
 

MarkF786

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 21, 2006
36
0
You guys are all fanboys ;-)

I'm OS agnostic; I use Windows & innumerable UNIX/Linux variants, and now OS X. I used to use System 7.5.1 and previous versions (I don't think it had this "issue"). All modern OSes I can think of use the "maximum" paradigm. In terms of a UI, I think it maps closer to reality...

If I'm working with real documents, I would just have one in front of me and the other set to the side. I would not pile them in a random stack and just write on whatever's on top.

If I were dicing vegatables, I would have one vegetable on the cutting board at a time... I would start chopping carrots on top of thed diced tomatoes.

Though you might be able to think of some activity in life where everything is jumbled up in a big pile in front of you, I would not think it's typical.

As a person who often has 10+ apps open at a time, it can get quite messy when they are all visible.
 

Tymmz

macrumors 65816
Jan 6, 2005
1,430
157
MarkF786 said:
You guys are all fanboys ;-)

I'm OS agnostic; I use Windows & innumerable UNIX/Linux variants, and now OS X. I used to use System 7.5.1 and previous versions (I don't think it had this "issue"). All modern OSes I can think of use the "maximum" paradigm. In terms of a UI, I think it maps closer to reality...

If I'm working with real documents, I would just have one in front of me and the other set to the side. I would not pile them in a random stack and just write on whatever's on top.

If I were dicing vegatables, I would have one vegetable on the cutting board at a time... I would start chopping carrots on top of thed diced tomatoes.

Though you might be able to think of some activity in life where everything is jumbled up in a big pile in front of you, I would not think it's typical.

As a person who often has 10+ apps open at a time, it can get quite messy when they are all visible.
I wouldn't consider myself a fanboy, but I find Apple's solutions way better.

If you don't want to have certain windows visible why not minimize it to the dock? Just press the yellow button or double click on the top of the window or press control + m.
 

emptyCup

macrumors 65816
Jan 5, 2005
1,482
1
It is a difference in philosophy which has been endlessly debated. I am in the mac way camp, and I think filling the whole screen will become more pointless as screens continue to get larger.

However, resize the window manually to fill the screen and most apps will remember that when you start them.
 

Tymmz

macrumors 65816
Jan 6, 2005
1,430
157
Off topic, but try following: press ctrl + scroll (mouse wheel or two finger on glide pad).

Just discovered that and had to share.
 

MarkF786

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 21, 2006
36
0
Googling the topic gave a lot of info. Apparently this is one of the top "annoyances" most people point out in OS X. Also, there are a few utilities to fix it. I'll have to try them out.

Mark
 

awhitaker

macrumors newbie
Sep 8, 2006
29
0
I like the fact that I can click on a word document that's peeking out on the left side of my firefox window. Or click on Lotus Notes which I always have at the top of the screen. I always Firefox in the center and Itunes at the bottom, so all my apps are just a click away. I could use the toolbar to click between apps but it's habit forming how each person clicks between apps and this the way I do it.

Also, I was wondering what this green button everyone is talking about and just discovered it. Cool. I've never used that before.

The one thing I hate is when I open a web page in a new window rather than a tab, and it resizes the new window too big. It covers up my other apps and it pisses me off. I'm sure there's a fix for this in the Mozilla preferences but it doesn't bother me enough to find out.
 

yellow

Moderator emeritus
Oct 21, 2003
16,033
1
Portland, OR
MarkF786 said:
Googling the topic gave a lot of info. Apparently this is one of the top "annoyances" most people point out in OS X. Also, there are a few utilities to fix it. I'll have to try them out.
I think one should replace "people" with "switchers" and this might be accurate.

The reason (IMO) that the Mac OS is like this (and always has been) is because the Finder and the Desktop are a very important resource. Not so much in Windows, though moreso with XP. But it's integral to the Mac (moreso in pre-OS X), and if you're full screening Word or Safari, it's a little more difficult to get to the Desktop quickly. Just my theory.
 

someguy

macrumors 68020
Dec 4, 2005
2,315
8
Still here.
yellow said:
I think one should replace "people" with "switchers" and this might be accurate.

The reason (IMO) that the Mac OS is like this (and always has been) is because the Finder and the Desktop are a very important resource. Not so much in Windows, though moreso with XP. But it's integral to the Mac (moreso in pre-OS X), and if you're full screening Word or Safari, it's a little more difficult to get to the Desktop quickly. Just my theory.
Hence, the birth of Expose. :)
 

decksnap

macrumors 68040
Apr 11, 2003
3,070
70
MarkF786 said:
You guys are all fanboys ;-)

I'm OS agnostic; I use Windows & innumerable UNIX/Linux variants, and now OS X. I used to use System 7.5.1 and previous versions (I don't think it had this "issue"). All modern OSes I can think of use the "maximum" paradigm. In terms of a UI, I think it maps closer to reality...

If I'm working with real documents, I would just have one in front of me and the other set to the side. I would not pile them in a random stack and just write on whatever's on top.

If I were dicing vegatables, I would have one vegetable on the cutting board at a time... I would start chopping carrots on top of thed diced tomatoes.

Though you might be able to think of some activity in life where everything is jumbled up in a big pile in front of you, I would not think it's typical.

As a person who often has 10+ apps open at a time, it can get quite messy when they are all visible.
When you get around to multitasking you'll find it's much easier to not have things maximized. I mean, what's the point? To hide things that aren't in your way anyway?

Your analogy seems to apply to people who only do one thing at a time, or whose projects are contained in a single app only. OS X realizes that you should only make things as big as they need to be, no more, no less.
 

yellow

Moderator emeritus
Oct 21, 2003
16,033
1
Portland, OR
someguy said:
Hence, the birth of Expose. :)
Indeed. But I think that was more because OS X is such a good multi-tasker (as opposed to pre-OS X), and people tend to have a lot more open and working at one time.