Maybe a silly question:, can Apple TV be a router too?

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by mugwump, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. mugwump macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2004
    #1
    For some reason I can't find this info, but if I wire into an Apple TV with ethernet, can it also act as a wireless internet router? I'm trying to kill two birds with one proverbial stone here.
     
  2. goblin macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    #4
    Any idea if the ATV would work the other way as a router? Connect wirelessly and use its ethernet port to connect to something else? Yeah, I know, a stretch even thinking this might work, but it would be nice. :)

    I keep my Home Theater components isolated to one "insured" Monster Cable power/connection source in case there is a powerout or lightning strike, otherwise I could run an ethernet cable direct. The Monster Cable box doesn't filter/protect ethernet.
     
  3. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

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    Sep 3, 2004
    Location:
    London, UK
    #5
    Think of the :apple:TV as a small computer with a special video card capable of playing HD content. It can't act as a router any more than your Mini can.
     
  4. roland.g macrumors 603

    roland.g

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
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    #6
    A Mini actually can act as a router.

    If wireless came into a mini it can share that internet across its ethernet port and vice versa, if connected via ethernet it can share its internet wirelessly.

    But that would still be a no on the Apple TV.
     
  5. rendezvouscp macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Long Beach, California
    #7
    Stampyhead: a Mac mini can share its Ethernet connection wirelessly, so it's not that far of a stretch to think that the TV could do the same under your school of thought.

    mugwump: the closest you could get is putting an AirPort base station on top of your TV and then connecting the TV to the base station with an ethernet cable.
     
  6. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2004
    Location:
    London, UK
    #8
    Yes, you're both right. I guess the point I was trying to make is that the OP seemed to be comparing the :apple:TV to an Airport Extreme in his mind whereas it would make more sense to compare it to a Mini. So I guess mine was a bad analogy.
     
  7. strachanjm macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #9
    Just to clarify...

    So I can't use the ethernet port on the :apple:TV to connect my 360 to my network like I can with my Airport Expres? That's kinda lame.
     
  8. Cave Man macrumors 604

    Cave Man

    #10
    Why is it lame? The ATV is an endpoint of an A/V distribution chain.
     
  9. strachanjm macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #11
    Lame probably wasn't the best word, but still, its kind of annoying to me. I wanted to replace my airport express behind the TV with the :apple:TV and now I have both back there. I understand that its an endpoint, but my little airport express can function both as an endpoint and as a bridge. It's got audio out and an ethernet port, which sounds a lot to me like an :apple:TV without video output. All I'm saying is that it connects to me wireless network with the faster 802.11n speed, and it has an ethernet port. Just seems lame that the ethernet port on my Express can do it, but my :apple:TV can't.

    One last question though, regarding the symbol above the ethernet port on the :apple:TV, what does that symbol mean. Based on the symbols on the AEBS, I assumed that symbol meant it could share an internet connect, while the symbol above the plug for the internet on the AEBS meant you could only input an internet connection on that port. I'm posting picture below for reference. Apparently I misunderstood the symbols, but can someone clarify? The same image appears above the ethernet port on the AE.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #12
    It's the same symbol as the AEBS LAN port. If you are using the AEBS as a router, your modem would go into the WAN port. The other ports are just a hub off the router.

    edit: The Express only has one port, but since it can be used as either a router or a bridge, it makes sense to use their LAN symbol.
     
  11. jgreshes macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    #13
    No, it is lame.

    >Why is it lame? The ATV is an endpoint of an A/V distribution chain.

    It is completely lame that AppleTV can't be a router because all the AppleTV is, other than lacking an optical drive, is a Mac Mini with a slower processor and different A/V ports. Anything a mini can do, the AppleTV can do unless artificially crippled by Apple to not cut into other sales.

    With a mini you can plug your cable/DSL modem into its ethernet port and share the connection wirelessly. Hardware-wise the AppleTV is certainly capable of doing the same thing, and it would be pretty damned neat if it did because it is usually going to be located right next to the cable hookup. But Apple doesn't want to lose a possible Airport sale, so the internet sharing functionality is removed the version of OS X shipped with the AppleTV. Just like Apple makes it hard to play AVIs over a SAMBA mount--why make it easy to play the most-downloaded format when you can make buying from iTunes the easiest route?
     
  12. VanFruniken macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2003
    #14
    Actually, it doesn't require much processing power AT ALL for a computer to bridge 2 ethernet networks. In a previous life I once configured a PC 8088 to do this and it bridged 10Mbps beautifully. Today's machines can easily do hundreds of Mbps and still have ample time to spare for other tasks.

    On another topic, isn't Airplay just the video version of Airtunes? Hence aTV could be the new Airport Express.
     
  13. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #15
    Holy resurrected threads batman.
    this thread is over 4 years old, long before the aTV 2 came out.

    not really,
    airtunes re-encodes the audio as apple lossless and sends it over the network.
    airplay sends the video file to be played locally.

    people had video cheats working long before audio, even though audio had been out for several years. Someone finally broke into an express last april, and got the key that the express uses to authenticate itself for airtunes.
     
  14. bpaluzzi macrumors 6502a

    bpaluzzi

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    Sep 2, 2010
    Location:
    London
    #16
    EDIT: Sucked in by thread resurrection. Sorry!
     
  15. whooleytoo macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #17
    It may be an old thread, but it's a good question. It'd be interesting if the ATV could serve as a router - I wonder if that would help reduce the latency a little with Airplay gaming.
     

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