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Apr 12, 2001
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After North Dakota tried and failed to pass legislation that would have paved the way for third-party App Store options, Minnesota and Arizona have introduced new bills that would loosen Apple's control over App Store developers.

app-store-blue-banner.jpg

A Minnesota bill shared by Star Tribune would force Apple and Google to keep products from Minnesotan developers on their app stores even if those developers sell them directly or through other channels, skirting current in-app purchase rules.

Supporters of the bill believe the bill would allow developers in Minnesota to avoid the commissions collected by Apple and Google.
"A lot of people are concerned about the increased influence and power that Big Tech has, and I think there's a lot of interest in trying to make sure that we have a fair and open digital economy," said Rep. Zack Stephenson, DFL-Coon Rapids, who is sponsoring the bill in the House.
Lobbyists for Apple and Google have allegedly already started aiming to stop the proposal. "They are loading up," said Minnesota Representative Zack Stephenson. "I understand that they have been reaching out to some of my colleagues. I heard whispers of that occurring throughout the Capitol. I think we got someone's attention."

Apple does not allow developers to use their own in-app payment systems, instead requiring all apps that sell digital goods and subscriptions to do so through Apple's in-app purchase system. Apple collects a 15 to 30 percent fee from all in-app purchases.

Under the terms of the Minnesota bill, Apple and Google would not be allowed to retaliate against a developer for using an alternative system to charge customers, which is something that Epic Games tried to do last year. Epic attempted to use a direct payment option, violating Apple's App Store rules and resulting in the Fortnite app being removed from the App Store.

A similar bill in Arizona would also prevent developers from being forced to use Apple and Google's in-app purchase options. As highlighted by The Information earlier this week, the bill was advanced by the Arizona House committee and will now go to a broader vote.

North Dakota's failed bill would have allowed for third-party App Stores, also giving developers an alternative to Apple and Google's in-app purchase systems and fees, but it did not pass.

Apple Chief Privacy Engineer Erik Neuenschwander advocated against the North Dakota bill, telling the senate that it "threatens to destroy the iPhone as you know it" by requiring changes that would "undermine the privacy, security, safety, and performance" of the ‌‌iPhone‌‌.

U.S. antitrust regulators last year held an investigation into Apple's App Store fees and policies. The inquiry ultimately resulted in a 450 page report from the U.S. House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee recommending new antitrust laws to address Apple's monopoly over software distribution on iOS devices. That report has not yet led to any new laws.

Article Link: Minnesota and Arizona Bills Aim to Let Developers Skirt Apple's In-App Purchase Rules
 

itsmeaustend

Suspended
Apr 27, 2016
332
816
Do they plan to pay for the server resources to host the games? Fortnite was free on the App Store, IAPs was the only way Apple was profiting from it. You don't sell your product in a physical store and expect to do so for free, no, the store gets a cut too. It's just how life works (and how it should remain).
 

natnorth

macrumors newbie
Jan 22, 2021
6
69
Maybe they'll come out with a two-tier system where if you pay the 30% you get all the benefits of the store (recommendations, being in the Top 100 lists, etc) and if you don't then you are on the app store but just using all the promotional opportunities.

Or pay-per-need.... if you want push notifications or something else then there is a fee for that. I'm sure these numbers would add up quickly for most when they see all they are getting!
 

jclardy

macrumors 68040
Oct 6, 2008
3,690
3,093
Will this also mean we can buy stuff on Amazon without paying Amazon? Yay!
No but did you pay Microsoft or Apple when you used your Mac or PC to shop on amazon? No? Why not?

Because it is an operating system. Just like iOS and iPadOS.

Apple should have the right to police their own App Store, even to the extent they do today...as long as users can choose to "shop" in other App Store if those rules become too draconian. People should own the devices they purchase, not corporations.
 

Quu

macrumors 68040
Apr 2, 2007
3,113
5,701
It really seems like the wind is turning against closed ecosystems. Apple especially is facing legislation like this in multiple countries and states and the EPIC lawsuit which is essentially about the same thing.

I'm starting to wonder if the days of them controlling the only gateway onto the iPhone is coming to an end.
 

natnorth

macrumors newbie
Jan 22, 2021
6
69
No but did you pay Microsoft or Apple when you used your Mac or PC to shop on amazon? No? Why not?

Because it is an operating system. Just like iOS and iPadOS.
Why would we pay? We don't pay Amazon for the privilege to buy from their store, we just buy! Sellers on Amazon pay Amazon not only to be able to sell on their platform but also a commission on each sale. it's the same with Apple, Steam, Google, etc... you want to sell in the store then you pay for that.

You are free to use your iPhone/iOS/Android/whatever without using the store if you don't want to... no charge!
 

The Cappy

macrumors 6502
Nov 9, 2015
462
816
Dunwich Fish Market
Supporters of the bill believe the bill would allow developers in Minnesota to avoid the commissions collected by Apple and Google.Lobbyists for Apple and Google have allegedly already started aiming to stop the proposal. "They are loading up," said Minnesota Representative Zack Stephenson. "I understand that they have been reaching out to some of my colleagues. I heard whispers of that occurring throughout the Capitol. I think we got someone's attention."
Sometimes, it seems like that's the point of most legislation: not that it was a good idea or a wise idea, but that you got attention for it.
 

Realityck

macrumors 68020
Nov 9, 2015
2,371
3,378
Silicon Valley, CA

Political Posturing​

Ultimately, however, even though the bill seems slightly less draconian than what was on the table in North Dakota, it still seems like little more than posturing on the part of state politicians, who are trying to portray this as a way to help Arizonans and small businesses by “fighting Big Tech,” yet at the same time citing examples of other multi-billion dollar big tech companies like Epic Games and King as being the underdogs — “small app developers” who “have to absorb the cost and struggle to survive or pass the tax onto their consumers.”
From Arizona Is the Next State Lining Up Against the App Store ‘Monopoly - IDropNews 2/24/21

How can multi-billion dollar companies be the underdogs?
 
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Seoras

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2007
661
1,567
Scotsman in New Zealand
Forcing Apple to drop the in-app payment exclusivity will change nothing - hopefully (I don't want iOS cracked open, insecure and not protecting my privacy.)
As a developer I'm happy to continue using Apple's payment system. 15% seems like a lot but it isn't. PayPal takes 6%.
On top of that I don't have to deal with people wanting refunds and users get a better purchase experience using Apple's payment system because it is full integrated into iOS. 15% is worth it I think.
I also think the users will probably convert better with apps that continue to use Apple's payment system because of this.
If they bust open iOS for any payment in-app I won't be switching.
 

I7guy

macrumors Penryn
Nov 30, 2013
27,421
15,752
Gotta be in it to win it
It really seems like the wind is turning against closed ecosystems. Apple especially is facing legislation like this in multiple countries and states and the EPIC lawsuit which is essentially about the same thing.

I'm starting to wonder if the days of them controlling the only gateway onto the iPhone is coming to an end.
It ain't over till it's over. I have a hard time believing that Apple would allow legislation where:
1. the end purchaser is no longer secure with their payment options and would have to be aware of the who they are purchasing from and,
2. allow goverments to dictate their revenue. That's already been tried and failed over the course of time.

Hope Apple has some tricks up it's legal sleeve.
 

jclardy

macrumors 68040
Oct 6, 2008
3,690
3,093
Why would we pay? We don't pay Amazon for the privilege to buy from their store, we just buy! Sellers on Amazon pay Amazon not only to be able to sell on their platform but also a commission on each sale. it's the same with Apple, Steam, Google, etc... you want to sell in the store then you pay for that.

You are free to use your iPhone/iOS/Android/whatever without using the store if you don't want to... no charge!
I don't think you read the post I replied to, it's in the quote...

What I am asking you and everyone, is what is the difference between MacOS and iOS. On a Mac, I can sell my app in the Mac app store. I can sell it via SetApp. I can sell it via Steam. I can sell it on my own website. On iOS? The App Store is literally the only option.
 
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