More memory means more time to boot?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by zoran, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. zoran macrumors 68030

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    #1
    My iMac (27", 2.93GHz) had 4GB (2x2GB) from the beginning. Recently i purchased an extra 16GB (2x8GB) module. I took off the 4GB, placed the 16GB and i noticed that boot time takes longer. The chime was heard a 4.8sec and now with the more memory placed its heard at 7.9sec. Users window at boot used to appear at 25.8sec now its appearing at 37.1sec.

    Is it normal for boot time to take longer when one places more memory?

    Is there some app that i can check with, the speed of my imac?
     
  2. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #2
    Actually something else might be causing your problems. More memory helps the boot process. Check your HDD, as that is the first thing to be related to boot time increases.
     
  3. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #3
    Memory must be the issue here because when i switch back to the 4GB it boots faster. And when i say "boots" my time measuring is made up to the chime sound and the user screen appearance not when desktop appears!
     
  4. dangerly macrumors regular

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    Oct 27, 2009
    #4
    You can try to install the two memory modules in different slots than they are now.
    Should install one in Bank0 and one in Bank1.
    You can check in which banks they are installed now from the Apple menu-About this mac-More information-Memory
    And then install them in a different memory slot.
     
  5. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #5
    Are they the rated speed or slower?
     
  6. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #6
  7. benwiggy macrumors 68020

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    #7
    Traditionally, on computers, yes, as the RAM is usually checked in some way at boot.
    However, as modern computers get faster, the time difference gets smaller and smaller.
    I don't know whether those times are typical. I upgraded my Mini from 4 to 16Gb -- but I've never timed it to within 1 tenth of a second!

    If your computer runs normally once booted, and is not slow in any other way, then I would relax and get on with my work.

    You can check Activity Monitor to see if any process is hogging the CPU. Apart from that, programs that provide you with up-to-the-minute monitoring of various parameters are nothing but distractions and a cause for worry.
     
  8. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #8
    RAM is not only measured by capacity but by speed as well. Right now, Macs have either 1333MHz or 1600MHz RAM speed support. If the rated speed of the memory you bought is slower (say 1066MHz), then your computer's logic board will adjust to that speed and instead of running at the fast speeds it will cap itself at 1066MHz.

    In other words, you slowed down your system. You have to ideally get the same speed as your logic board supports or if not, a faster speed (don't worry, your computer won't slow down or speed up, just your RAM will slow down to your computer's maximum speed).
     
  9. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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  10. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #10
  11. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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  12. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #12
    The Mid 2010 iMac can use 1333Mhz (PC3-10600) DDR3 RAM. The modules you listed are the ones required, so you are ok on that end. However, slow downs are not.

    At this point try using one or the other. It seems you might have gotten a bad module.
     
  13. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #13
    How can i check the modules quality? use memtest or remember?
     
  14. Failurbydesign macrumors regular

    Failurbydesign

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    #14
    Those work well, rember is memtest in application form. I used tech tools 7 to scan my memory when I was having issues.
     
  15. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #15
    "tech tools 7" is the name of the app?
     
  16. Raima macrumors 6502

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    #16
    No it's not something else. It's memory. When the system switches on, it does a memory test. The more memory you have, the longer it takes before it proceeds to boot up. Simple as that.
     
  17. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #17
    so you say that its not an issue, its normal. The more memory installed the more it takes time to prepare for boot?
     
  18. Raima macrumors 6502

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    #18
    That is correct. It does a quick integrity check before proceeding. My iMacs behave the same way, both of them with 32gb of ram.
     
  19. comatory macrumors 6502a

    comatory

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    #19
    did you do PRAM reset after installing new RAM? i think you are supposed to do that...
     
  20. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #20
    how do i do that?
     
  21. comatory macrumors 6502a

    comatory

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  22. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #22
    what are PRAM reset side effects though? will i see any changes of the standard values of my computer?
     
  23. comatory macrumors 6502a

    comatory

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    Apr 10, 2012
    #23
    no there are no "side effects" as far as i know.
     

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