My opinion of the iPad continues to evolve.

Discussion in 'iPad' started by spiderman0616, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. spiderman0616 macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2010
    #1
    Late last year, I decided I didn't want to own an iPad anymore. I had started working from home full time and was finding that without my train commute every day, I wasn't using the iPad nearly as much as I used to. When I did use it, I kept thinking, "I could have also done that very quickly and easily on the Mac." Long story short, I sold my Mac mini and my iPad Air to Gazelle and got a 13" retina Macbook Pro.

    I LOVE my rMBP. I use it almost daily for work, and at night and on weekends for playing games in my Steam library and recording/editing my podcast. It is the only proper tool for me for a lot of the things I do every day--too many compromises and weird workflows in iOS for a lot of my daily tasks.

    But after about a month of not having an iPad anymore.......my god, I missed that device. I kept running into situations where I used to use my iPad but now only had my iPhone or Mac as an option, neither of which was the ideal device for what I wanted to do. (reading in bed, watching shows on the couch, etc.) I was immediately back on the internet looking for another iPad and finally settled on a mini 3. I always wanted to try the mini form factor, and I found a good price for a brand new one on eBay, so I jumped on it.

    When the iPad Pro came out, that changed the equation a bit as far as what people want to do on an iPad, what Apple thinks we'll be doing with iPads in the future, and what people with "normal" sized iPads should expect to be doing in iOS 9 now that it's more focused on multitasking and productivity. I started wondering, "Will an iPad Pro be my next laptop? Was this iPad mini a bad choice?"

    The answer to both of those questions might actually be "no" for me. After selling my iPad, missing it like crazy, and getting another one, I was SO excited to have an iPad again. I was using it for everything. I even have a bluetooth keyboard I sometimes use with it to type documents and emails, and that works fine. I have no trouble working on the smaller screen, and an iPad Air screen really doesn't seem THAT much bigger than an iPad mini screen. But my "new device excitement" has died down considerably, and the iPad mini 3 has fallen back into the role my iPad Air used to occupy--my "sometimes" device. It can't fully replace my Mac and it can't fully replace my iPhone. It's the right tool for me for the fun jobs, but it's not usually the right tool for me for the important jobs. In a pinch, I can actually do all the things on it that I do on my other devices, including even my full time day job, but it's just not as good of an experience.

    (Quick Edit: Yes, I have extensively tried an iPad Pro several times, and I actually do LOVE the hardware.)

    So here I am, on my rMBP, typing up this long thread. My iPad mini is downstairs on my desk. I'm home with a sick kid today, and my device of choice for my all-day entertainment and communication needs ended up not being any of my iOS devices, but rather my one remaining OS X device. I don't need anything else while I'm just sitting in the kitchen waiting for my son to need something.

    After all the going back and forth last year about whether or not I even NEEDED an iPad anymore and then finally deciding that it wasn't a need but a major want, I have realized that I made the correct decision sticking with my iPad mini 3. The iPad Pro is about 20x overkill as far as what I use iPads for. The only way that can change in the future is if iOS itself dramatically changes. I don't necessarily care if there's a file browser or a trackpad, but there are a lot of other things I need iOS to do before I'm an iPad Pro owner. The iPad mini/Air on the other hand? Those are closer to my own personal vision of the future of tablet computing. My opinions continue to evolve, but that's where I'm at for now.
     
  2. ZombiePete macrumors 68020

    ZombiePete

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    #2
    Your experiences are your own and I understand that everyone is going to have a unique perspective, but I think that you like many others are underestimating the impact that the bigger screen of the iPP has on the experience of using one full time. The iPP "feels" like a full-fledged computer moreso than any other iPad, in my opinion, and its size is a major factor in that. You really can't compare it to an iPad Mini or Air and expect the experience to be the same, because it's really not.

    That is not to say of course that it's the right computer for everyone; I don't know what your "important" jobs are compared to your "fun" jobs, but for my needs it excels far more than I ever expected it could. I do absolutely understand the hesitation, though; I convinced myself (and allowed myself to be convinced by others) that the limitations of the iPP were causing me to miss out on features that I might need even if I rarely used them, and that scared me into returning it. After trying out the SP4 (bleh) and going back to my rMBP and iPad Air 2 for a few weeks, I found myself missing the "(almost) all in one" iPP.

    I'm more convinced than ever that this is the future of consumer computing.

    Again, I don't pretend that it's the right device/experience for everyone today, and it's not my "only" computer by a long shot. But what it easily became is my main computer, and since I bought it for the second time it's been the only computer I've used...happily.
     
  3. friedmud macrumors 65816

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    Jul 11, 2008
    #3
    Good post. I think a lot of people lose sight of the fact that there are MANY different workflows in the world and there are many ways to map the available types of devices into those daily workflows.

    So many people think that they want ONE device to do everything... but throughout a day/week we don't have the same types of tasks to do.

    Personally, I always carry a 15" rMBP, iPad Pro, iPhone 6+ and Apple Watch. I seamlessly swap back and forth between these devices all day long depending on what I'm doing. In my particular position there is no not any single device that can cover all of the tasks I run into every day.

    There are many options for computing now... and everyone just needs to find what works for them.
     
  4. spiderman0616 thread starter macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    Aug 1, 2010
    #4
    Specific examples:

    1. Podcasting. Still no iOS apps that allow me to use an iPad/iPhone as my portable recording studio. There's an app called Ringr that comes close. It has really good sound quality and is 100% designed to do a double ended podcast FOR YOU. It takes all the syncing work out of the equation and removes the need for Skype. But it also doesn't allow me to use my nice mic because it doesn't support lightning mics, and using the EarPods mic for podcasts results in sub par audio. Ferrite is another good one, but doesn't have built in telephony like Ringr does, so it's useless to me as well as far as iOS goes. It would be my go to for recording the show in the same room with someone else, but I rarely do that. Also, doing super precise editing and post production later on in GarageBand for iOS is a complete nightmare and adds hours to the job. Not ideal. I expect that this situation will be remedied in time. The folks over at Ringr have assured me that lightning support is coming. Once that happens, I could easily record a double ended podcast while on the go without having to bring my Mac. (I would still want to edit it and add things to it later on my Mac, but I don't usually do stuff like that on the go.)

    2. Steam. iOS doesn't run Steam or any of the games in my Steam library. And I LOVE my Steam library. Not wiling to give it up.

    3. Work. I can actually do my full time job comfortably from my current iPad for a lot of the things I do every day. The other day, I took my iPad with me to work while waiting for my car to be repaired, and that worked out fine. But on days where I have lots of conference calling, screen sharing, and heavy multitasking to do (and no, split screen on iOS does not cover it) I HAVE to have my Mac or my work PC hooked up to my two big widescreen monitors so I can have a million things going on at once. And this is not a niche use case. This is how a lot of office jobs are. Every one of my last companies has given every employee two monitors to work from because that's how a lot of people work these days. iPad Pro would need that kind of functionality for me to want to switch to it full time.

    I am by no means a nay sayer of the iPad Pro. I have tried it out several times extensively, and I think it's fabulous hardware. The speakers are amazing, the screen is gorgeous, and the guts seem to be super fast. But it's still iOS, and it's still an iPad. Just doesn't fit as my every day computer yet. That being said, I wouldn't be surprised if this rMBP eventually gets replaced by an iPad Pro sometime in the next couple of years. I'm just waiting for iOS to catch up with what I need to do.
     
  5. sracer macrumors 603

    sracer

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    #5
    Odd that you mention podcasting because IMO one of the best podcast apps is only available for iOS. Boss Jock Studio is terrific. I use my Samson Go USB mic or Blue Yeti (with powered sub hub) for recording on my iPad.
     
  6. spiderman0616 thread starter macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    #6
    Will it allow you to do a double ender though? My co-host is nowhere near me, and I like the sound quality to be as high as possible, so we do a double ender every week. Ringr allows me to do that, and the way it handles it is actually BETTER than how I do it on my Mac because the telephony is built in and all the syncing is done in the cloud and given to me when it's all synced up. But the support for my nice Lightning mic isn't there yet. So Ringr has the telephony and automated syncing functionality, but not the mic support. Ferrite, and many other apps, have the mic support I need but not the built in telephony. And NONE of them allow me to talk on Skype and record in another app at the same time like I can on a Mac. Also, after the recording, I like to add in clips and music intro/outro type stuff. That's still a pain in iOS--drag and drop from a file to GarageBand in OS X is way quicker.

    Once that kind of stuff falls into place on iOS though? I will never need to bring a Mac with me for the purpose of podcasting ever again. That day is coming very soon, and I'm looking forward to it. But it will also not necessitate me buying an iPad Pro. All I need to do is plug in the mic, join the session, and talk. Screen size doesn't matter in that case. In fact, I barely need an iPad at all to do that--I could just bring my mic and my iPhone and do all the nitpicky editing and stuff later on my Mac.
     
  7. Mac2me, Jan 7, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016

    Mac2me macrumors 6502a

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    #7

    I'm like you. When out and about I'm with my iPhone 6+ and Apple Watch. Right size and cabilities for what I might do while traveling about during the day.

    My iPP just replaced my iPad 2 and it's perfect for when I'm laying in bed (or on the couch) and wanting to go on the internet or read emails there. My iPad 2 was too small for me to comfortably watch movies in bed so I'm loving my iPP for that now and hubby and I can both comfortably see the screen. Just got my Pencil and had fun using it last night and can see that being used for a number of drawing situations now (haven't use my old tethered Wacom tablets for many years now, not work related, more personal use).

    I do like having my 15" rMBP for other things. I don't use the cloud so my MBP is my main storage for photos and such. Just started playing a bit with Garage Band and I know it has different capabilities on the OS than the iOS. I also like having it for keyboard use. Honestly for much of what I do on the internet I don't need to have a keyboard and probably won't bother with a keyboard for the iPP. When in bed I'd much rather use my iPP than a bulkier device with keyboard--too much surface real estate there for where it's being used and more awkward to hold.

    I'm not looking for an all-in-one device. If I only used it for one thing in my life I could see that but I find the choice of form factors to be desirable. I am loving the added capabilities and size of the new iPP so for me upgrading has been a big plus from my old iPad 2. I think Apple has a nice range of products to address everyone's needs, and with the ability to share among devices Apple has really moved in the right direction to make picking up whatever device you want to use a more or less seamless experience. I'm sure it will only get better.
     
  8. Eric5273 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #8
    I'm trying to make my iPad Pro work as my only computer. I still have a 2010 Macbook Pro which I have kept "just in case", but I'm hoping to make my decision over the next month and then sell the Macbook if I think I can manage with the iPad Pro as my only computer.

    What I've learned is the hardware is certainly capable, it's just a question of the software and having the right combination of apps. As more and more people attempt to make this transition, I think more and more good apps will come out. So far there is only one thing that I have not found the perfect app for. There is a round about way of accomplishing what I need, but it's not ideal. However, this specific task is one that I only do once every few months, so I think I can live with the slight inconvenience. For my daily tasks, between the various programs from Readdle and the Microsoft Office apps, I'm able to handle everything surprisingly easy, and in some cases easier than I did on my Macbook Pro.

    I definitely think iOS is the future of computing, and I think for sure in 10 years there will be no more OSX. All the best features of OSX will be slowly integrated into iOS, as we have seen happening over the past few years.
     
  9. Smeaton1724 macrumors 6502a

    Smeaton1724

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    #9
    I agree, the major limitation for me is submitting apps and content to the app store via iOS, it cannot be done. OSX is the feeder OS.
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #10
    Overall my opinion of the iPad Pro is evolving from being a great looking tablet but not much difference then an iPad Air, to one that I think could be more useful then I originally intended.

    I'm still not ready to buy, but I think for some, its a great device. For me, I'm on the fence.
     
  11. Eric5273 macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    That is surprising that Apple would not make a way to submit apps in iOS.
     
  12. Steve686 macrumors 68030

    Steve686

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    #12
    Bottom line.

    Nobody even "needs" Apple products. We could all get our work done on any platform from Windows to Linux.

    Fact is, we choose what platform or devices we use to do our daily tasks or just be entertained.

    It's kind of an unanswerable debate about each individual Apple product and why "I don't 'need' it for what I do.". Everyone has their own interpretation of how much power, real estate, or portability is required in their daily lives.

    I tend to think people tend to start these threads to merely justify and convince themselves why, or why not, they choose each Apple offering. That's fine as nothing Apple-branded is cheap.

    I don't bother with trying to justify and just buy the products, use, and enjoy them. If it works for what I do, great. If not, it gets returned.

    Just my simplistic opinion.
     
  13. Smeaton1724 macrumors 6502a

    Smeaton1724

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    #13
    Refreshing opinion to have. I must admit I used to be like that, now I waste far too much time deciding a specific use case. I'm pretty sure I'd be more productive to just go with the flow and purchase what I like the look of.

    :apple::)
     
  14. spiderman0616 thread starter macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    Aug 1, 2010
    #14
    My main problems in this "debate" are ALL software based. I don't have any problem with the lack of USB or drives or track pads or anything like that. And I'm not married to having a file system--I barely use Finder as it is now. Furthermore, the actual apps I need are pretty much all present in iOS.

    The problem for me is what those existing apps can/can't do compared to their OSX counterparts, and whether it's an issue of the app just needing more work, or the inner workings of iOS itself PREVENTING those apps from doing what I need them to do. I have experienced instances of both.

    There are cases where Apple needs to make some concessions to developers and there are other cases where developers just need to make their apps more feature complete. Either way, I'm sure of three things: 1) I am NOT ready for iOS to be my main platform, 2) iOS is the way forward, OS X will eventually go away, and 3) Initially selling my iPad last year was a huge mistake. I love the iPad in all of its sizes. I just need iOS to catch up with me before an iPad is my main machine.
     
  15. Nausicaa macrumors 6502a

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    Jan 11, 2007
    #15
    It took me a few weeks to adjust to iPad Pro from my Air, but at this point I won't ever buy a smaller iPad again. iOS 9 shines on the larger screen and it improves the devices functionality and usability so much. The size and weight were my biggest sticking points, because the Air is pretty much weightless, but again I've gotten used to it and it's still a very light device, and the usability more than makes up for it. It can't *do* everything my desktop can, but I find I can use it the same way I use my desktop for most things, which I didn't feel about my other iPads. The bigger keyboard is awesome, and doesn't obscure nearly as much of the screen content as on an Air, the speakers are awesome and it's great for media, and multitasking is easy. I love having News in slideover and Safari open while I eat my breakfast in the morning. Email is easy and much better than on my Air. And oc course, Pencil is amazing. I love it. I actually take it out of the house MORE than I did my Air.
     
  16. MartyCan macrumors 65816

    MartyCan

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    #16
    I used to own an iPad Air, iPad Mini, MB Air and my work computer is a rMBP. The mini I only really used when I was going out. It was small enough to fit in the pocket of most of the coats or jackets I might wear. But I finally decided it was a bit redundant as around the house I would carry both with me everywhere so I sold it. My daughter now uses the MB Air.

    When the IPP came out I thought I would not be interested. Then I made the mistake of going into an Apple Store. I liked the drawing stuff with the pencil. I liked the Smart Keyboard. I lasted about a week then went out and bought an IPP and sold my iPad Air. It does feel closer to a computer with the keyboard but mostly offers more. If Excel functioned on it at a higher level I could do away with a computer.

    But now I feel like I'd like a mini again for an easy to tote toy but truth is my 6+ is really enough for on the go use.
     
  17. profmatt macrumors 65816

    profmatt

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    #17
    I have an addiction to Apple products but lately have tried to figure out a coherent portfolio of devices.

    What I think I've settled on is this.

    I had a rMBP and an IPP. That seemed like a duplication to me. Although I've never figured out what iPads are actually for, I get the IPP: I know what I want it for and where it fits in. So the rMBP is going. But I need OSX: for Adobe CS and for Excel -- the iOS version doesn't do everything I need. So I've just ordered an iMac. That's a clearly different device to my IPP: its big screen and OSX make it clear to me what it's for -- what it can do that the IPP can't.

    The plan is to treat the IPP as a laptop replacement. With bells on: I have the Apple Pencil. And I'm getting the Smart Keyboard, so I have touchscreen and keyboard options. (And split-screen works so well on the IPP's large screen.)

    Then I have my iPhone 6S for when I'm out and about or my IPP is out of reach. The large screen makes it a usable device. (My old iPhone 5 seems laughably small.)

    And my Apple Watch for when I'm out and don't want to use my iPhone.
     
  18. Robnsn2015 macrumors regular

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    Jul 12, 2015
    #18
    I agree. My career is actually based off of Microsoft product that don't even natively run on Apple products. I buy Apple stuff because I like their stuff. I do try to justify these expenses, though.

    Anyway, I think the iPad Pro is an interesting experiment. I think that, over time, the traditional PC will get less use in people's personal lives. Ironically, the Personal Computer will become a Corporate/Enterprise Computer, while the smartphone will become the true "personal computer" for a lot of people. Technologies and approaches discovered on the iPad Pro will probably migrate over to smartphones, which will make for interesting times.
     
  19. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #19
    I keep getting drawn into the iPad Pro, yet I don't need it, and I have a 12" (seems slightly smaller) tablet - the Surface Pro 3. I have more options with the SP3 then the IPP, yet maybe because of the apple logo, I'm getting tempted. I don't see high usage from this and given its high price point, its hard to justify.
     
  20. Jasmynp macrumors 6502

    Jasmynp

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    #20
    I actually just sold my SP3 for an iPad Air 2. I found the SP3 to be very capable, but it was a terrible tablet and I don't especially need a laptop. I can do most of my work froman LTE iPad. I wish the Microsoft app handled macros, but other than that, I'm thrilled.
     
  21. mattopotamus macrumors G5

    mattopotamus

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    #21
    For personal use, an iPad mini is the only thing I own. It's my everyday computer basically.
     
  22. jossix macrumors newbie

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    Mar 17, 2013
    #22
    I was planning on returning my ipp mainly because i could not hold it comfortably in my hands.Yesterday i tried the apple smart cover and silcone case combo. Problem solved i am keeping the ipp.
     
  23. seadragon Contributor

    seadragon

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    Toronto, Canada
    #23
    How do find the weight? With the case and cover, I found the IPP a bit too heavy for my liking (I think it's over 2 lbs with this combo). Plus, I found the silicone slippery and combined with the weight, it would constantly be sliding downwards when completely hand-held unless I gripped it uncomfortably tight.

    I think the pro is a nice device for a lap or desk, but I just found it too big and heavy as a hand-held device.
     
  24. spiderman0616 thread starter macrumors 68030

    spiderman0616

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    Aug 1, 2010
    #24
    Same here. For the specific tasks that I personally can fully accomplish in iOS, the iPad Pro's screen size does not have any advantages over the iPad mini. I don't work in Excel or Word much, and I don't do any hardcore audio, video, or photo editing in iOS (or in OS X really for that matter). My full time job mostly consists of teleconferencing and email, both of which I can comfortably do on a mini.

    And I did want to add--I am not one of those people who thinks the iPad cannot do "real work". I do real work on it all the time. I'm actually typing this post using my fold-up Bluetooth keyboard with my iPad, rather than my MacBook Pro which is 10 feet away from me. But I do distinguish between OS X work and iOS work. There is a big difference in my mind as far as what can be done on each OS. Neither is better than the other, they are just different.

    More often than not, I choose my iPad or iPhone over my MacBook Pro. There are other times when the Mac is the clear winner. And yet there are other times where I really hem and haw over which device I need to bring with me to best get the job done. That tells me that in my life, there is still a need for OS X. I think what we're seeing lately is the existence of the iPad Pro helping a lot of people justify why they have fully replaced their laptops with an iPad. I actually have no problem with that concept--in fact, I'm a little jealous of the people who can pull it off with no barriers or compromises. I wish my daily workflows were fully do-able in iOS. Unfortunately, they just aren't.
     
  25. mattopotamus macrumors G5

    mattopotamus

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    #25
    Oh and my printer supports AirPrint, so I really am covered for everything I do :)
     

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