Need help handling photos

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by tawcat, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. tawcat macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    #1
    I just uploaded photos from a recent trip. Now I am trying to go through and edit/delete them. Is there an easier way than having to open each pic via Preview to edit them?

    I was hoping there was a way I could open the entire folder and navigate each photo. Just seems like a lot of double clicks for such a simple task.

    Or is iPhoto the best way to store, view, and edit photos?

    I feel so so stupid.
     
  2. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #2
    I use iPhoto

    But you can open a folder and select a photo
    Press the spacebar for QuickView
    Use the up and down arrow
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    You can highlight all the photos, then right-click and open with Preview. That way, they're all in Preview and you can navigate through them, make individual or global changes, etc.
     
  4. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #4
    Perfect, I knew I could do it. Just don't do it enough to remember. Thank you so much.
     
  5. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #5
    The other way to do it... and I am working from memory here since I don't use iPhoto anymore...

    Open the album with all your vacation picks. I believe you can use the arrow keys to move to the next photo, iirc. Use the key combo to "rate" each photo. One strategy is to start at the 1st photo, and if it is not a complete dud give it a 1 star rating. Don't think about each photo... the goal is to move through all the photos as quickly as possible, and to give 1 star to all the photos that are not the inside of the lense cap, your feet, totally blurry, photos of the inside of the backpack, etc. Basically...you are eliminating the non-photos as quickly as possible. Should only take about 1 second or less per photo... so it's quick. No thinking.

    Use the filter function, and delete the ones that didn't get starred. Start at photo 1 again and give a 2nd star to anything that you will want to go back to. So... don't star anything that is a crap photo. Again - don't think about it... the crap photos will stand out... just skip them. Anything not a complete dud gets the 2nd star. This should take about 1 second per image.

    Do a search on just 2+ stars. By now you should have eliminated a far number of images very quickly. Start at #1 and give a 3rd star to anything that may be a contender. Now you start thinking a bit - but not too much. But be critical. Don't zoom in yet. Just look at the overall composition, etc. Anything you may want to look at again gets the star - otherwise, no star. This could take a couple of seconds each as a little thinking is required.

    At this point, without much time taken, you should have things narrowed down quite a bit. Plus you really know the collection of images. Filter on 3 stars, and with this much smaller selection of images you can now start zooming in to check focus, exposure, details. The really good ones get 4 stars... otherwise they stay at 3.

    Sometimes I cheat and on the initial sort (1 star) I will bump something to 3 stars if it's just obviously really good.... so there is some flexibility here. I read about this strategy on the Adobe site. It may seem like a lot of work at first, but if you motor on through the 1st star and 2nd star as quickly as possible and detach your "judgemental" brain ... you can get to a short list very quickly, where you can spend time being critical.

    Luck.
     
  6. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #6
    snberk: Thanks for that. You are so right, I spend much time trying to decide, this seems like a quick way to make up one's mind.
     
  7. Dave Braine macrumors 68040

    Dave Braine

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    Mar 19, 2008
    Location:
    Warrington, UK
    #7
    Some would say not. However, if you have nothing else on your Mac to do the job, then yes it is. Much easier than using Preview.
     
  8. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #8
    Being a long time PC user, I like to keep all my stuff in separate folders, but I think you're right iPhoto is much easier.
     
  9. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #9
    Just gonna have to practice with iPhoto. Seems to be pretty good. Thanks to all.
     
  10. AverisDaddy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2011
    #10
    How do I get photos from the "Pictures" library to iPhoto to view them?

    I also figured out how to quick view/look but pressing space bar and/or the up and down arrow does nothing. Thanks in advance.
     
  11. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
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    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #11
    To use iPhoto efficiently, imho, you need to completely change the way you think about storing your photos. This is not a 'Mac' vs 'PC' thing. iPhoto is a Digital Asset Manager - Aperture is another one, and so is Lightroom. It's just that iPhoto is a 'light' version of a DAM, and only available on a Mac.

    With a DAM - like iPhoto - it's better to let the application store your photos within it's own folder structure and to only ever access them through the DAM. If accept the DAM's way of working you will have much easier time finding photos, organizing photos, and collecting photos than you ever thought possible.

    With a DAM you have two primary ways of organizing your images: Keywords and Albums (Collections in Lightroom). Since your images are already sorted into folders, recreate the folder structure with the albums/collections. By doing this you've got your transitional bridge from what you used to do to a new way of doing things.

    One of the (many) things that is different about a DAM is that your images are imported - and then never touched. It's called non-destructive editing. Along side the folder structure is a catalogue/database. Every thing (meta-data, keywords, image edits, etc) is recorded in the database. The editing changes are only applied on export or when the image is displayed. This means you can also go back to square one... you can't screw up an image. As long as you never touch it with anything but the DAM.

    Another difference - that will make your life oh so much easier - is that you can put an image into as many albums/collections as you want ... and it's the same image. That's because the image itself is not being duplicated/moved... just notations in the database/catalogue. For example - with your folder based system - have you ever wanted to put a photo into more than one folder? Does the photo with your cousin visiting the office Xmas party go with the family folders? The work folders? Or the holiday folders? Did you duplicate the photo to put it into each? How do you keep track of which copy has the most recent edits? Do you keep copies of the full sized version plus the ones for emailing? With a DAM like iPhoto life becomes easy. You still have the folders for Family, Work, and Xmas - and you put the photo into each one. This doesn't create duplicates - it merely adds an entry to the database. When you edit any of the copies, you are editing all of them.

    You also don't make copies for emailing, uploading, etc. When you need to email/upload/etc you "export" the image at the resolution you need. Once it's mailed/uploaded/whatevered you delete the copy you exported...it's redundant. Preset exports save the day here because you can have a preset for each common export you need. No more trying to remember what sizes each service requires.

    Once you've done this you've already have a better system than the old "folder based" system. And you haven't even touch key wording, ratings, and colour labels. Or - Smart Albums/Collections.

    If you are good about key wording a DAM will find every single images of your cousin Irene regardless of whether she appears in the work, family, party, or vacation albums/collections. Smart Albums/Collections are simply permanent searches.

    Hope this helps...

    Luck.
     
  12. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #12
    snberk: Thank you for that detailed explanation. I just need to sit down and familiarize myself with iPhoto.

    It all sounds and looks so simple. I found out yesterday that I cannot, or at least I don't think I can, import saved files to iPhoto. They must be imported via a medium, i.e. camera, flash drive, or memory card. Other thing I found is that I cannot email a video directly from iPhoto. So my thoughts here are to save my videos, few that I do, to a folder on the Mac.

    Took me a while to figure out how to create albums and move files. And the importance of rating and titling each photo became very apparent.

    Thank you again for sharing your expertise.
     
  13. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    Oct 22, 2007
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    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #13
    You are welcome. As you can see, I am a bit of an evangelist about DAMs... I am a naturally disorganized person. I love taking photos - passionately - but I often hated the experience of trying to find them and print them later on. Current projects were OK, but the old stuff I wanted to revisit were murder for me. I started with iPhoto, and then went to Lightroom - I work at this professionally - and now I have complete control over my images. So.. I can get a bit passionate about it. I often see people using a DAM wrong, and they hate it. There was nothing wrong with it... but it was like watching someone trying to eat soup with a knife. Good tool, just not being used as intended.
    OK... this is a Mac thing (I believe). Take a folder with photos in it, and just drag and drop it onto the iPhoto icon.... if the folder trick doesn't work you may need to select all the photos and drag those.... but I think the folder will work.
    I dont' do videos... so I have no experience. Sorry. However, there is a very good iPhoto over at the Apple support website. Less fun than a MacRumours forum, but sometimes the advice is more focussed.
    Again.... my pleasure. Wait until you've discovered creating book. For special trips or events we create a book instead of popping photos into a photo album. It's a great gift to give to someone too.
     
  14. Batt macrumors 65816

    Batt

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    #14
    I don't understand this. The "Import to library" command allows me to import pretty much anything I want into iPhoto. What am I missing here?
     
  15. Dave Braine macrumors 68040

    Dave Braine

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    Mar 19, 2008
    Location:
    Warrington, UK
    #15
    Just drag and drop them into the main iPhoto window, and they will be imported.

    See above.
     
  16. tawcat, Jul 4, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 4, 2012

    tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #16
    snberk103: Thanks again, and gosh it does appear that I can just move an entire folder from the Mac to the iPhoto icon. Guess I read wrong when I was reading about importing.

    Here is another dilemma. I'll post a screen shot below. If you look at my menu, towards the top you'll see two labels Just Us, same date range and total pics; towards the bottom you see Ann's House, same dates and pics. When I attempt to cut the duplicate, it comes right back. How do I go about delaying these duplicated entries? I have no idea how they duplicated, so I am real really lost. Thanks.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #17
    Your Welcome. Sometimes 'easy' is the best, eh?

    Don't know about the duplicates... it's been a while since I've used iPhoto extensively. In Lightroom there is a setting to warn you before imported duplicates.... try looking for a similar setting. However, just delete the duplicates... Just be sure you read the warning dialogues. You want to make sure you delete the duplicated entries (in the database) Not the photos themselves, unless these master photos are also duplicated.

    There is away to ask iPhoto to show you the location of the original photos. Check to see where a few of the photos are in each of the two duplicated albums. If the master photos are duplicated in two different folders, then use iPhoto to delete the master photos. If both albums point at the same set of original photos, then use iPhoto to delete the library entries only.

    Think of it as an old-fashioned book library, that used index cards in the card catalogue. When you are looking at the thumbnails in iPhoto (and albums and folders) you are just seeing the card catalogue cards.... not the books. The screen shot above seems to show a 2nd set of card catalogue cards... what you need to figure out is if there are actually 2 of every book on the shelves, or if there is still just one book - but there is a 2nd card catalogue card for each book. The card catalogue cards represent the book - but are not the book. In the same way, the iPhoto previews represent the photo - but are not the actual image. Hope this helps....

    I suspect I can wish you a Happy Fourth of July, eh?!
     
  18. tawcat, Jul 4, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2012

    tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    #18
    Thank you again! And yes 4th wishes are appropriate and appreciated.

    I muddled around a bit and found that if I view these via "events" I can highlight the event and delete it. More learning ahead. Thank you for sharing the knowledge and your time.
     
  19. DewGuy1999 macrumors 68040

    DewGuy1999

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2009
    #19
    Maybe this Apple Support iPhoto page will be helpful.
     
  20. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #20
  21. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #21
    So I downloaded the app Duplicate Annihilator. After 5.5 hrs it finished it's search of some 12,000+ photos. Found 1,100 duplicates and marked them " duplicate.". I did a search in iPhoto and once they came up, I proceeded to delete them.

    I think I did it right, if not, I'll be missing photos!!
     
  22. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #22
    You have a back up copy, right? :)
     
  23. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #23
    Yup!:D
     
  24. tawcat thread starter macrumors regular

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    May 3, 2011
    #24
    Well, I finally think I've got some of iPhoto figured out. Did some editing, cropping etc, it was a breeze. I edited the photos in the album so I'm not sure if that edit affects the original photo or not.

    I'll continue to play and eventually I may even understand what I'm doing!!!!!

    Thanks for all your help.
     
  25. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
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    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #25
    Good for you. iPhoto can be a powerful tool, if you get to know it.

    The way editing works in iPhoto (and Aperture and Lightroom) is by 'non-destructive' editing. The photo is imported, and a catalogue entry made in a database. Everything you do to that photo is noted in its database listing. Nothing is ever done to the original photo, including edits.

    When you view the image on your screen, iPhoto has taken the unaltered image, applied the edits you've made, and shown you the results. That edited image only "exists" (at that moment) on your screen (and in RAM, I suppose - for the nitpickers :) ).

    If you merely look at that photo and then move to next photo then the edited photo no longer exists. If you were to use the Finder to look at the photo in the iPhoto library it would be the original, unedited, photo. Just as it came out of the camera.

    However, while looking at it in iPhoto, if you decide to do something with this edited photo then iPhoto then a new photo is created, with the edits applied. If you decide to print the photo - then the only copy of this new and edited photo exists as a print on paper. On the computer, there is still just the original unedited image and the catalogue notes.

    If you email the edited photo from within iPhoto, then the only copy of the edited photo exists as an email attachment. It will exist only where that attachment is.

    If you "export" the edited image to your desktop, then the final edited images exists only on your desktop. The original untouched photo is still in your iPhoto library.

    ---

    If you put a photo into a number of albums, the original unedited photo 'exists' only in the iPhoto library - and is there only once. The only thing that gets created when you put a photo into multiple albums are notes in the database. It simply says that image P1000457.jpg can be found in the Albums "Family; Vacation; Rome; Silly Party Hats". If you subsequently add that photo to another album - then the only change is that another entry is made to the list. If you edit a photo in one album, then those edits are visible in all albums. If you want to create a new image, independent of the original then you need to create a duplicate.

    In Lightroom (and I believe iPhoto, so I mention it here) you can duplicate or create "virtual copy" of an image. What this does is merely duplicate the database entry - there is still just one image in the library. This means your already large image library doesn't bloom into something even more gigantic. The duplicate copy inherits all of the "metadata" (keywords, albums, flags, stars, etc) and edits of the original. At that point it looks like you have two identical images side by side. However, from this point the duplicate becomes independent. For instance, you can now make one image monochromatic and leave the 2nd image in full colour. Two independent images. However - still just one untouched image stored in the library. The only thing that is changing is the database. You can create a whole lot of different images this way, to test and try out things, without needing additional storage space. You can have different duplicates in different albums. The only real linkage between these images is that you can't delete the original untouched image without deleting all of your duplicates as well. But you can delete any of the duplicates without affecting any of the other duplicates.

    Cheers - Good Luck.
     

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