Need some advice on US plugs

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by paperclip777, Mar 3, 2015.

  1. paperclip777 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    #1
    Hi there, can anyone tell me what is the standard US plug?

    Is it 2 pin, 3 pin?

    Cheers
     
  2. AAPLinc macrumors 65816

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    Jul 27, 2012
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    Hollywood, CA
  3. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    Inside
    #3
    They are both standard. The three prong is used for devices that need grounding. They can usually work with just the two prongs, but not as safely.
     
  4. aristobrat macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #4
    Current wall outlets are 3-pin, although many things that plug into these outlets only use two pins.

    You'll see 2-pin outlets in older buildings.
     
  5. paperclip777 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    #5
    Cool thanks.

    For 3 pin, does anyone know the exact type I need?

    When I google there's so many types.

    I'm having an appliance made in China, I just want to make sure it's safe, thanks.
     
  6. JAT macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2001
    Location:
    Mpls, MN
    #6
    What appliance? Electrical cords and plugs are rated based on the amount of electricity running through them. If you are talking about a clothes dryer, you need a serious cord that is not the same as the standard cords discussed in this thread so far. If it is a blender, pretty much anything is fine.
     
  7. paperclip777 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    #7
    Cheers, it's a bug zapper.

    2 x 20w bulbs with 2,000v on the zapper grid.

    It's small, 16x12 inches. So maybe 2 pin is ok?
     
  8. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #8
    I believe the plug you want is a NEMA 5–15P plug. It's rated for a maximum of 15 amps at 120 volts. Most home appliance bug zappers use this plug/outlet.
     
  9. KUguardgrl13 macrumors 68020

    KUguardgrl13

    Joined:
    May 16, 2013
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    #9
    What kind of appliance? Some appliances like refrigerators run on 220v instead of 110v. They also use a much larger plug. You can buy them separately at stores like Best Buy and Home Depot though.
     
  10. paperclip777 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 20, 2012
    #10
    Thanks Intell, this one looks right, 3 pin.
     
  11. paperclip777 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 20, 2012
  12. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #12
    Make sure the lead is outdoor-rated, to withstand the effects of UV and rain. Definitely want a 3-prong for outdoor use, in fact any outdoor-rated extension cord will be 3-prong so the 3-prong cord you choose for the zapper will have no problems plugging in.
     
  13. moonman239 macrumors 68000

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    Mar 27, 2009
    #13
    See if your local Apple store has any plug adapters for international travel.
     
  14. jdechko macrumors 68040

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    Jul 1, 2004
    #14
    More importantly, the NEMA 5-15p is internally grounded. That's what the 3rd pin is for. It's not strictly necessary, and some Darwin-award candidates have taken it upon themselves to remove the ground conductor, but needless to say, it's a bad idea. This is the one you'll want to use, especially for an outdoor application like a bug zapper.

    Additionally, you have 2 different types of the "standard" 2-pronged plugs in the US. The first is unpolarized. Both blades are of equal width and the plug can be inserted in either direction. The second is polarized, which has a slightly thicker blade for the neutral conductor.
     
  15. cynics macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    #15
    If you are buying a bug zapper from China for the purposes of killing bugs I would avoid it. If you are buying it for the poor English on the box and the comedic value I would actually highly recommend it.

    Here is one my friend bought called "The Killer".

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I don't know if reading the box was more funny then watching bugs fly into and then back out of that thing or not.

    ----------

    Thank you for using Xingli electronic mosquito.
     
  16. turtle777 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2004
    #16
    International travel with a bug zapper ?

    Seriously ?

    -t
     
  17. jdechko macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    #17
    That sounds like a bad idea. Apple's A/C adapters, at least the non-5v USB ones, are designed for 110/220v. They will auto switch to the correct voltage and not blow up. Many other things are voltage specific. Even though you may be able to get a plug adapter, there is still a significant risk of a fire when using an incorrect voltage. At the very least you run the risk of ruining whatever you plugged in.
     
  18. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    Boston
    #18
    Wall outlets are three prong (unless you're in a very old house then two prong exist). As for the actual cord that plugs into the wall outlet, well both are standard. Depending on the device, it will be two or three, though most electronic gear, i.e., TVs, computers and what not are grounded and thus three prong.
     
  19. Huntn, Mar 8, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #18
    Us_Standard_Power_Supply_Cord_with_Csa_Ul_Approved_Canadian_Electrical_cable_SJOW_SOOW_SJTW.jpg

    Either. As an adapter, the 3 prong would be better (120v).

    There are 220v plugs (like below), but they have a different configuration so you are not accidentily plugging a 120v device into 220 which would not be good. As a rule, you don't see these a house or hotel room for other than an air conditioner or other heavy duty item like a clothes dryer. However, I know that items like Apple laptops, iPads and I think iPhones (made for sale in the the US), but can be used when traveling in Europe, because they have power supplies rated for both 120 and 220 power sources as long as you have an adapter that allows you to plug it in. I assume the same is true for Apple devices made for sale in Europe/Asia, they work in most locations.

    slp_collins_220.jpg
     

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