New Mac Mini owner!

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by F0rbesy, Apr 16, 2017.

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  1. F0rbesy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2017
    Location:
    Nottingham, United Kingdom
    #1
    Hi guys, this is my first post on here! Never had a Mac before and my awful windows machine finally died! I won a Mac mini on eBay with specs of 2.6ghz, 1tb fusion drive and 8gb (late 2014). I was going to use my wireless keyboard and mouse, external speakers and my full HD screen. It's arriving Tuesday and can't wait for it! Couldn't stand the windows 10 UI. I'm going to be using iCloud drive mainly as luckily had all my uni work backed up and will be using my office 365 subscription. Just looking for any hints and tips for a noob jumping ship to the Mac!
     
  2. Boyd01 macrumors 68040

    Boyd01

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    New Jersey Pine Barrens
    #2
    Congratulations! One thing you should do is to setup Time Machine to backup your Mini to an external drive (or a network drive). It is usually not too intrusive if you leave it set for automatic, but you can also control it manually - see the menu bar icon that looks like a little clock. Along the same lines, another program I find really useful is Carbon Copy Cloner from Bombich Software. I believe you can use it for a month for free but I found it well worth the purchase price.

    It can create a bootable clone of your Mini on an external drive. If the internal drive fails, you can plug a clone into the USB port, boot directly off it and continue working as though nothing happened. With Time Machine, you would have to go through a "restore" process which can take quite awhile if you have a lot of data.
     
  3. jpietrzak8 macrumors 65816

    jpietrzak8

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Location:
    Dayton, Ohio
    #3
    I think the most important tip when moving from one operating system to an entirely different one is patience. ;) It is often said that OS X is the most intuitive computer user interface available, but it is still complex, and is also very different from Windows. As with anything, it does take some time to learn how to use it, and even more time to learn how to use it efficiently! Give yourself some extra time to get used to how it works for the first few days or so; as with everything else, there will be at least a little bit of a learning curve to get acclimated to it. :)
     
  4. Count Blah, Apr 16, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017

    Count Blah macrumors 68030

    Count Blah

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    US of A
    #4
    Where to begin?
    - Finder(Smiling mac face app) is your friend. It will be there through thick and thin. Applications that come with the Mac, and Application you install, go into the Applications folder by default(Easily findable in Finder!).

    - Much like Windows, your personal files are organized under your home directory(/Users/*your user name*). Documents are in Documents, Photos are in Photos, etc... It's REALLY useful to create new directories, to organize them properly.

    - In the Utilities folder, in Applications, you will find more useful "pro-ish" applications like Terminal(command line), Activity Monitor(Task Manager), Disk Utility(Formatting, checking for disk errors, etc...), Bootcamp Assistant(for installing Windows if you have to), etc...

    Search through these forums or the internet in general - invariable, someone has faced the same issue you have.

    Good Luck!
     
  5. Easttime macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2015
    #5
  6. EnesM macrumors 6502

    EnesM

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    #6
    You might need Paragon or Tuxera NTFS in order to be able to write to external NTFS drives (Mac can read but can't write to NTFS out of the box).

    Very useful tools
     
  7. Jambalaya macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2013
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    A smart move :) I did the same in 2009 and still usin that same Mini with a few upgrades.

    My first tip would be to consider buying an Apple Wireless keyboard so you have the keys like command and the function keys to switch between desktops or start launchpad, I also like the Majic Mouse but thats quite expensive for what it is. Maybe try what you have for a while and then consider.
     
  8. jpietrzak8 macrumors 65816

    jpietrzak8

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Location:
    Dayton, Ohio
    #8
    Just to note, any keyboard should be fine for that. The "Windows" key on a Windows-compliant keyboard functions as the "Command" key when used on a Mac, and the function keys should all work the same.
     
  9. frank4 macrumors regular

    frank4

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #9
    I also recommend the Apple wireless keyboard, I have the previous model that uses 2xAA batteries. I have the Magic Mouse but it causes hand strain so I switched to a Logitech M557 bluetooth (removed wheel spring so it scrolls smoother).

    Internet connection by cable or Wi-Fi both work fine.

    Mini is an excellent little computer and I hope they keep making them.
     
  10. Micky Do macrumors 68000

    Micky Do

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2012
    Location:
    An island in the Andaman Sea.
    #10
    I endorse the Time Machine suggestion. Having lost a couple of weeks of files (fortunately nothing too significant; I was in the habit of backing up every month or so) when the HDD failed on my original 2005 Mac Mini, the coming of Time Machine was a significant factor in the decision to replace it rather than repair it in 2009.

    Yes, it may take a little bit of time to adapt, coming from Windows, but OS X / MacOS is quite intuitive. A non tech minded colleague who still has Windows 7 on the computer he shares at home with his wife, struggles a bit with Windows 10 on the computers in our office. The office geek made a Hackintosh of one, and it works well. My colleague tried it, and took to it quite quickly, without realising that it was now effectively a Mac.

    My own needs are fairly simple. The apps a Mac comes with are are adequate for me. I have Office for Mac installed, but seldom use it these days. Pages may not have all the features that Word has, but I find it easier to use. Likewise for Numbers and Keynote. Office files can be opened using the iWork equivalent, and exported as Word, Excel, and Powerpoint if necessary. For photography iPhoto (now Photos) is fine for me. They are not to everybody's taste, and you can install other apps if you prefer, or your needs are greater.

    As to keyboard and mouse; it comes down to budget and preference. The wired Apple Keyboard suits me, but any keyboard will work. I like the Apple Magic Mouse, but not enough to cough up for one. I have long used a basic wired $8.00 Logitech mouse, which is fine for me.

    In the end, various options are available. Be prepared to take a little time to sort out what is best for you.
     
  11. Boyd01 macrumors 68040

    Boyd01

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    New Jersey Pine Barrens
    #11
    I never really understood the need for a bluetooth keyboard/mouse unless you need to use it far away from the computer. I have the standard Apple USB wired keyboard and it's very nice and also a lot cheaper. It includes a USB extension cord if you need more distance, and you can plug a mouse into the keyboard so it only requires one of the Mini's 4 USB ports.

    If you are used to Windows you could just get a standard 3 button/scroll wheel mouse. That's what I have been using for years on all my Macs, I just hate that Magic Mouse. Was staying with a friend for a week and helping her on the computer with one of those things. Never did get used to it. Am using a small generic USB mouse that cost something like $15 at CVS and it's great. :)
     

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