New owner of a Canon T2i

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by fuzzylemurs, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. fuzzylemurs macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #1
    Hello folks... I just purchased a Canon T2i with a Canon EF 28-135mm lens to start my amatuer photographer journey. I also purchased the needed filters, tripod, and bag.

    Any other T2i owners out there that have advice on this camera's strength's / weaknesses? Anything I need to get immediately to add to my experience?

    I have no specific subject, just love life and want to capture it!

    Thanks guys :)
     
  2. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #2
    I have a T2i / 550D

    There's nothing to stop you going out and getting great photos with what you have. Sure, different lenses (the 50 f1.8 is a good choice) would be good - but you'll be fine with what you have for now.

    Go take some pictures, post onto the forum and enter the weekly / fortnightly competitions!
     
  3. bowzer macrumors 6502

    bowzer

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    #3
    I have an 18-135mm, and I found I liked doing lots of close up shots with blurred backgrounds, and shots in low light conditions. If your interested in that kind of photography, you might want to consider a 1.4 or 1.8 50mm lens since that 28-135mm only goes down to f3.5.

    I picked up the 50mm 1.4 USM

    Or you could get the cheaper 50mm 1.8
     
  4. fuzzylemurs thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #4
    Thanks for the info. I will definitely be entering the photo competition!

    I love photos that have a nice depth of field (Bokeh?); The 50mm 1.4 Canon lens is a bit more money than I want to pay right now, but it is on my list for upgrades in the future.

    Do you feel the need to have a Macro lens for this camera?
     
  5. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #5
    You don't need the 50mmf1.4 - the 50f1.8 is actually a better choice on a cropped frame sensor, and the extra 2/3 of a stop isn't a big deal when it comes to background blur.

    http://bit.ly/dt4jxi

    I have the 50f1.4 and I generally try not to shoot it below about f2 since it's a bit soft.

    You don't need a Macro lens. They're handy though, and obviously one would be useful if you wanted to take a lot of close up shots!
     
  6. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #6
    Congrats on the purchase. You'll have fun.

    I am kinda thrown off when you are asking if you need a macro lens with this camera. Remember, this is not a specialty camera. There are specialty lenses (TS-E 17L, for example), and the Macro is one of them, but the magic is NOT done in the camera.

    I am sure someone will say to buy a book on aperture & exposure, which is a good suggestion. The best is to go out and practice.

    What filters did you buy? Where did you get them from? I am hoping some Best Buy D-Bag didn't con you into getting something that was A) cheap quality B) something you didn't need C) over priced, or D) a combo of any two or all of these. What kind of tripod did you get?

    The reason i ask these are for several reasons, and everyone has their own preferences/experiences/opinions on this. A UV filter for me is worthless. I have been shooting for years and years. I live in the PNW, I am in the rain all the time. I have shot on the beach, shoulder deep in water in streams, etc. I have had no problems with dust/etc getting onto the lens. The lenses (especially the higher quality ones) are coated. They are quite hard to scratch, believe it or not.

    I just don't see the point in putting another piece of un-needed glass on top of my lens. If you must get a UV filter, don't get a cheapo $10 UV filter. As much as I diss-like UV filters, there IS a MAJOR difference between a B+W UV filter and a Tiffen UV filter.

    Also, get THE BEST tripod you can afford. Always makes sure the LEGS AND THE HEAD can handle the weight of the camera/lens you are using. While some legs can handle 15LBS, some heads can only handle 7LBS, which will present a challenge. My last tripod was a bogen 3001PRO with a 322RC grip (not the best, but i love it) and it lasted 8 years. I sold it to upgrade. I still have the same head. I used to have a velbon (or vivatar, whatever they sell at walbogs or target) and it tipped over in the wind, along with my gear. They don't call the Canon EF 50mm 1.8 a thrifty fifty for nothing.

    Sorry for the rant. I hope you can decipher some useful info from this post.

    A cable release is also a NEEDED accessory. I got a rip off brand on ebay for $7, but the Canon brand for the Rebel line is $22 or $25 bucks. Plus they have the RC1 (something like that) that is wireless for $19.99. Also use MLU when taking long exposures.
     
  7. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #7
    Oh, and for the record, i DESPISE the 28-135IS, as well as the 17-85IS! just had to add that:)

    When you get the cash for a new lens, i would sell that one. You can get about $250-$300 for it. Much MUCH better alternatives out there!
     
  8. bowzer macrumors 6502

    bowzer

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    #8
    I decided to go with the 50mm 1.4 because I also like to shoot video, and the ring on the 1.4 is easier to focus with manually.

    But, there is a reason why the 50mm 1.8 is so popular, its super cheap ($100-150) and it takes great photos.

    Give it at try at a local photography store if you can!
     
  9. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #9
    I got mine new from B&H for $80 or $90. I want a metal mount one!
     
  10. fuzzylemurs thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #10
    Awesome info HBOC. I will pick up the 1.8 50mm Lens for that price. What about the 28-135mm lens caused you to have such a poor opinion of it?

    The filter I purchased is a Zeikos Multicoat UV filter. Nothing special. I also have some other filters that I purchased, but will not be using. They are for the kit lens, which is collecting dust, and likely will be sold.

    I purchased a semi-cheap (~$40) tri-pod from Amazon. I don't remember the brand offhand, but I can reference when I get home. It seems very sturdy, and definitely feels like it holds the camera's weight with ease.

    I agree with you that I need a remote, or cable release to avoid camera shake/movement when framing a long exposure shot.

    HBOC, you mention that there are ALOT better lenses out there than the one I have; are any of them in the same price range? I'm really just starting out with photography, so I cant justify spending more than $500 on a lens...

    Thanks again for the great info.
     
  11. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #11
    The 28-135 (and the 17-85) for me anyways, were just soft and the colours were not good. I tried several copies.

    I bought the 17-40L (which is obviously a different FL than what you have) for $620 shipped, and have been nothing but happy with it. I was used to the EF-S 10-22 & Sigma 10-20, so it was a better FL for me.

    If you sell the 28-135 for like $250-$300, you could use that money plus if you said you have a budget of $500 and get the 24-105L, or get a Tammy 28-70 2.8 and a 17-40L. Just depends on what your shooting habits are.

    Also, don't cheap out on filters! I used to use Tiffen, but it seemed to soften my shots and wash out the colours too much. I compare the shots with ones taken with the same type of filter from B+W, and you can see the difference.
     
  12. Gold89 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #12
    It's worth thinking about buying used lenses rather than new if funds are short. As long as you care for it a lens will last a long time and the prices, in particular on forum marketplaces, can really extend your purchasing power. :)
     
  13. BoingoBongo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    #13
    I would suggest getting a battery grip. They really add a lot to the rather small Rebels, and the second shutter release comes in really handy.

    The T2i looks like a great camera and I've seen some amazing pictures taken with it. It's seriously thrown a wrench into my plans to get a 7D.
     
  14. Hutch98R1 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2007
    #14
    +1 to all this.

    NIFTY fifty:D

    When I fits started, I thought any $50 tripod was a tripod... so not true. Now I have a $300 Bogen and LOVE it!

    My RC1 gets tons of use!
     
  15. Nostromo macrumors 65816

    Nostromo

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Location:
    Deep Space
    #15
    Best lens for this camera is the 17-55/2.8 IS USM. L glass quality. Of course, it is expensive at $1100. But it's top glass.

    Don't forget that the Rebel is a cropped sensor camera. To get the equivalent of the focal length you need to multiply it with 1,6.

    So, a 17-40 would be a approx. a 25-63. Not a good range.

    The above mentioned zoom translates into 26-80 in 35mm.

    Avoid the cheap zooms if you can afford it.

    If the above zoom is too expensive for you, consider primes like the 1,8/50 II. This is good for portraits thanks to the crop factor.
     
  16. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #16
    What's not good about that?

    The 17-40 f4 is a bargain amongst the L lenses. It's an ideal range for a walk-around lens (especially when partnered with a 50mm). It's been my cropped-sensor lens of choice for about 6 years!


    Also, do try a battery grip before going out and buying one. Personally, I think part of the appeal of the 'Rebel' bodies is their small size - and they're perfectly easy to use in portrait organisation. I can't see the point of bulking the body up with a battery grip.
     
  17. BoingoBongo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    #17
    Good point, the small size can definitely be an advantage so it really comes down to personal taste. I prefer battery grips on Rebels because I like the way they balance out the camera, especially when using bigger lenses. And I definitely don't mind extending battery life either :D.
     
  18. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #18
    The 17-40L may not be ideal for everyone, but it works for me fine. Also, when I upgrade to a 5D, i don't have to worry about selling all the EF-S gear.

    For the price, NOTHING will beat the 17-40L or the 70-200 f/4L optically or build quality. I picked up the 17-40L for $620 shipped. I just saw a 70-200L for $430 shipped (UT date code). While the 17-55 is a great lens, for that price, i would get the superior 24-70L.

    Also, DO NOT PAY RETAIL. AS Kramer says, retail is for suckers! I see the 17-55IS all the time at FM for $900ish. I mean feel free to pay $200+ more for the same thing, and then when you go to sell, you lose money. I HATE losing money on things i could buy used and even make a few bucks when i decide to sell or my shooting habits change.

    You can click on my links to see the quality of the 17-40L. If you look around, you could almost get the 17-40L + 70-200 for the price of a new 17-55IS.*
     
  19. viggen61 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    New Jersey
    #19
    Little late to be asking that, now, isn't it? :rolleyes:

    Seriously, I'll probably be watching for your comments on using the T2i. I'm in the market, and am having a hard time deciding!

    The absolute best thing to do is get out and start using the camera! Digital photogs starting out today have several huge advantages over those of us who started out in the film SLR days.

    Today, you have instant feedback of what your image looks like. In the past, we'd have to wait hours (if we processed the film ourselves), or days or weeks to have the film processed and returned to us. And it all cost money! Cameras were cheaper, but there was an ongoing cost that just isn't there any more. Sure, you may need to buy a few extra memory cards, but that's about it (yes, I know there are people who use memory cards just like film rolls...). You can delete bad images right in the camera.

    All this is not to mention the fact that many DSLRs seem to have a "mini PhotoShop" built in to them.

    "Bokeh" and "Depth of Field" are not the same thing. The former is the quality of the blur that is created when you have a shallow Depth of Field. Depth of Field is simply the range of distances from the camera that are in "acceptable" focus. A shallow (short) DoF is created with larger f stops (smaller numbers). For example, given a 50mm "prime" (fixed) lens, at f/1.8, the depth of field will be very shallow, while at f/16, the depth of field will be deeper. There are a lot of other factors that affect the Depth of Field.

    Depends on what you want to do! Nobody "needs" any particular lens, unless you are taking photos that require the performance of that lens, or that type of lens.

    My advice would be to take pictures first, scour the web for suggestions, and grow the kit as you gain experience, and want to try new things.

    Good luck!

    :apple::apple:
     
  20. FrankieTDouglas macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    #20
    Maybe get a 1.8 50mm, but other than that, my suggestion is to just go make photographs. What you have is perfectly fine. Now that you've purchased gear, try not to think about other gear again for a year. Just focus on using what you have and think about CONTENT.

    Once you can actually determine limitations that can specifically be pinpointed to your gear, then I'd say it's time to buy something new. Until then, just have fun. Learn about making exposures, how to read light, and understanding photographic design.
     
  21. fuzzylemurs thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #21
    Amazing advice guys - thank you so much.

    Also thank you for being so tolerant of a novice - thats hard to find on quite a few forums these days!
     
  22. Nostromo macrumors 65816

    Nostromo

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Location:
    Deep Space
    #22
    25-63 doesn't allow for portrait photography.

    I mean, you can do it. But it's better to have a lens that reaches 80mm (55mm in APS-C)

    Great you like the Rebel body.

    I don't discourage anybody.

    I didn't mention a battery grip. You must have read that in a different post. A battery grip is great if you shoot a lot in portrait mode. You have a better hold of the camera and a second release in a better position.

    I never bought a Rebel primarily for the viewfinder. I prefer a Pentaprism to a pentamirror viewfinder. And those bodies are too small for me, too, and bodies like the 40D or the 5D operate better in the field.

    But, as I said, cameras are a lot about preferences.
     
  23. firestarter macrumors 603

    firestarter

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Location:
    Green and pleasant land
    #23
    You'd better tell that to Henri Cartier-Bresson (who predominantly shot at 50mm).

    Or all the photographers who shot wonderful portraits during the 60s on TLRs and Hasselblads using 80mm lenses (equivalent of 50mm due to the larger film format)!

    You seem to have ignored the fact that I recommended partnering it with a 50mm f1.8 - which is ideal for portraits on a cropped format camera.

    I have a T2i and a 5DII. I use the 5DII more in studios, but the T2i more for travel/city photography. Both are tools, and the penta-mirror on the T2i is absolutely fine. I see the small and light body as an absolute advantage for travel. If you work with a camera long enough, using the smaller body without a battery pack really isn't a problem in any way.

    Both cameras also work fantastically with the Zacuto Z-finder system for cinematography use.
     
  24. Cavepainter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #24
    Much of your success and enjoyment with this or any DSLR will be related to your choice of lenses.

    Definitely go for the best lenses you can afford! Do yourself a favor and spend an afternoon trawling Canon lens review websites and come up with a short list of the most popular, best bang-for-your-buck lenses. Most sites will have pretty much the same list of 15-20 lenses- come up with one that fits your budget, buy it and have fun!

    I've owned digital cameras for about 10 years and a Canon T1i for around a year now and find the Canon to be an excellent setup - so your T2i should only be even better with similar circuitry, compatibility with Canon film and digital lenses and also a nice bonus of the HD video recording mode at 30 fps.

    I own a 50mm 1:1.4, 17-40mm 1:4 L, and a 70-200mm 1:4 L. I use the 50 for intimate portraits in natural light with a nice bokeh, the big zoom lens for far away subjects (spend extra for Image Stabilization if you can afford it) and I tend to use the 17-40 for most day to day subjects when I need the flexibility of a zoom- I usually leave this on on the cam and its probably my most used lens. I also disagree with a previous poster- the 17-40 on this sensor size camera is perfectly adequate for portraiture!

    A lens is like a fine musical instrument- if you buy junk for 175 bucks, it will be worth 50 used. If you buy a great, highly-rated used one for 600 bucks, it will probably be worth 600 bucks next year. (The exception being the best canon lens for the money, the inexpensive 50mm 1.8)

    Try to buy ones that are flawless, with the original box and the US warranty card. The one thing you gotta remember about lenses- if you're smart about your purchase, you can use a fabulous L series lens for a couple years or more and if you take care of it, you can sell it for pretty much exactly what you paid. Theyre that much in demand. Thats what I call affordable. All three of my lenses are worth exactly what I paid for them on ebay... one year later.
     
  25. HBOC macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Location:
    SLC
    #25
    The first state is so true, as well as how committed you are to wanting to learn and such.

    Also, used good lenses don't usually depreciate anymore than they are when buying used, unless a MKII comes out, but even then, that may or may not affect too much. I think it did on the 16-35MKI, as it really did need an IQ re-work. Supposedly there may be a 17-40L IS coming out, but who knows. That won't do anything to lower the price of the 17-40L, same thing with the 70-200 f/4IS. It didn;t bring down the price of the f/4L version.

    I have no doubt I can sell my 17-40L for the same price i bought it for in 3 years.
     

Share This Page