New to Mac, large video files to move

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by WannaSwitch, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. WannaSwitch macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    #1
    Hi everyone, I just ordered my first Mac, switching from a Dell Inspiron 1720 to a 17" MBP, and really looking forward to the switch. One big question, and in searching through the forums I see there are some ways to do it so I'm not too worried. Currently, I have a 750GB Seagate external hard drive that holds a lot of raw DVI files that I ripped in from an old Digital 8mm video camera. 20 or so 1-hour video files, each is about 12GB in size due to the raw video. Now, since I'm currently using Vista, that external drive is NTFS.

    Ultimately, I would think that I'd want to convert that external drive to the Mac file format. I have enough other drive space in the house on other Windows machines (wife and kids systems and another older external USB drive) that I can move the files off the Seagate drive, reformat it, and transfer the files back I think, but am I really going to be able to get 12GB NTFS files over to the Mac or should I spend time while I'm waiting for the MBP (2-3 weeks due to the high-res screen) splitting each of those big files into more manageable pieces (say, 15 minutes at 4GB a pop)? I really hate to do any video editing at all on my current Dell system, it's a frakkin pig.

    I see the other 3rd party software out there that basically mounts NTFS drives on Mac systems, but it looks like transfer speeds are affected so it sounds like an Apple-native file system would make more sense. Just not sure how to go about managing these huge files over to the new Mac.
     
  2. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    ~119W 34N
    #2
    OS-X will natively support NTFS read-only.

    It sounds like you will be needing to do the move off this drive, reformat HFS+, then move them back. There should be no problem handling the 12GB files as they are. I've worked with files twice that size or more and I'm sure others have worked much larger.
     

Share This Page