Newbie Mac-owner in dire straits (Random kernel panics)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Pear-shape, Apr 16, 2013.

  1. Pear-shape, Apr 16, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2013

    Pear-shape macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #1
    Hi, folks. I´m new to Mac and from Norway so please be gentle.

    I recently bought a used Macbook Pro 13" online and as the title indicates, all is not well with it. It´s an early 2011 model with i5 core and Intel graphics. The main problem with it is the random kernel panics that occurs, mostly when I have many programs open, but also when it´s idle. Depending on the workload, they occur at least twice a day.

    I´ve done a lot of research online these past few days and have performed various tests (AHT, memtest) to determine if it´s a RAM issue. The previous owner had the memory upgraded from 4 to 8 GB, but the standard set had a bus of 1333 MHz (according to Apple serial number info) while the upgraded ones only has 1067 MHz.

    Could this be the problem or could the RAM just be faulty? Or is it something else?

    While the AHT came out empty, the memtest showed promise when my screen got covered with green and red dots and a deep beeping sound. (If needed I can supply screenshots) I had to manually shut down in order to get it working again. Apart from the slight discomfort of kernel panics, the Mac works like a charm and I´m very happy with it.

    Helpful insight would be much appreciated.
     
  2. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

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    #2
    If Memtest crashes when running it is/can be an indication the RAM is faulty.
    (Memtest says so in their guide)

    But, you should look into your logs first, most important is a Panic Log, Crash logs can also indicate problems.

    If you have either of these you can post them here and we'll give a look at them.

    Do you have the old RAM, if so exchange and see how it goes, also helpful is to try one or the other RAM stick and exchange from one to the other port.
     
  3. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

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    #3
    No need for Screenshots. The previous poster nailed it. Faulty memory. Try working with one stick at a time to determine which one is the faulty one, or if both.
     
  4. yusukeaoki macrumors 68030

    yusukeaoki

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    Tokyo, Japan
  5. Pear-shape, Apr 16, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  6. Pear-shape, Apr 16, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013

    Pear-shape thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #6
    10.8.3

    ----------

    Can you tell me the difference with a 1067 and a 1333 MHz bus and which would be better suited for my model?

    One more thing: if one of the chipsets is faulty, wouldn't it be best to change both or is it satisfactory to use two different chipsets?
     
  7. blueroom macrumors 603

    blueroom

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    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #7
    Personally I'd replace all the RAM rather than futzing with it. If your MacBook came with 1066 I'd use 1066.
     
  8. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

    Joined:
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    #8
    The difference is just the connection speed. The faster, the better. Now, in this case, stick to the speed that came with your Mac.

    They are not called chipsets, they are called memory modules. No, it doesn't matter if one module is from vendor X, and the other from Vendor Y. All that matters is if both match in speed, latency and DDR type (in this case DDR3).

    Matching vendors is just a preference.
     
  9. Pear-shape, Apr 16, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013

    Pear-shape thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2013
    #9
    Thanks. I was leaning towards the same thing, but it's always good to get a second opinion. According to Apple SN it came with a 1333.

    ----------

    :eek: My computer knowledge and lingo is pretty basic, especially in a foreign language, but I'll definitely change to memory modules with 1333 if it proves to be the RAM that is choking my experience.
     
  10. Pear-shape thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Apr 16, 2013
    #10
    Last concern: is it possible that it could be the logic board or is it most likely faulty RAM? My Macbook came without any warranty and I fear replacing the logic board is not worth the money compared to buying new modules.
     
  11. AppleMacFinder macrumors 6502a

    AppleMacFinder

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    #11
    Of course, the problem with logic board is possible as well.
    But the RAM problem is much more likely to happen,
    and it would be less expensive to check if it is true.

    According to Buying RAM guide (which could be interesting for you to read),
    your computer supports up to 1333MHz and 16GB RAM. You could buy a faster 1600MHz RAM:
    it will be compatible with your computer as well, but will be downclocked to 1333MHz speed;
    however, it could be run at the full speed with newer MacBook Pro models, which is good.

    Also, it is better to choose RAM with CAS latency equal to 9:
    there were some cases with compatibility problems caused by CL 11 RAM.
    CAS 11 RAM is a bit cheaper, but also slower: from performance point of view,
    1333 MHz CL11 RAM would be the same as 1067 MHz CL9 RAM.
     
  12. justperry macrumors 604

    justperry

    Joined:
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    In the core of a black hole.
    #12
    I've downloaded all of your Panic Logs, went through them and most are all different from each other.
    Now, if it was something in the OS causing this most are the same while yours are almost all different processes where the Panics occur.

    Many of them have this Error :type 14=page fault which to me indicates it is RAM related.

    Now, you should try what I told you in my first post, get one RAM stick out and move it over to the other port, see how it goes for a while, if you get Panics daily 2 days would do, if you don't get Panics the RAM and/or slot is most likely OK, then use the other stick and put it in the other slot where it was NOT located before and see how it goes.
    But, even this does not guarantee 100% to find if the RAM is the problem, sometimes people do this and no problems occur but when used together it reoccurs.

    You might find someone on Ebay or whatever site there which sells their Original RAM for a few Euro's, but you need the right RAM.
    It's a shame the nearest Apple store is far away, they could do a free Test easily and is much better than Apple Hardware Test
     
  13. MacYost macrumors member

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    Jun 14, 2009
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #13
    Your computer needs memory with a *minimal* speed of 1333 MHz. If your current RAM is only 1066 MHz, it will *never* work correctly (sorry about the yelling). Your current memory reacts to slow when the CPU accesses it. So the CPU gets rubbish data and will panic. Do not think about another problem until you put the *correct* RAM in your MBP and test it with that RAM.

    If you have to buy the new RAM, please do it at a site that knows about memory for Mac's. Not all 1333 memory chips will function in your computer.
     

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