Next-Generation Wireless Wi-Gig Specification Published

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The Wireless Gigabit Alliance, an organization dedicated to creating wireless connectivity standards for consumer electronics using the unlicensed 60GHz spectrum, today announced the publication of its new multi-gigabit wireless standard. The Wireless Gigabit Alliance is working in partnership with the Wi-Fi Alliance, the organization responsible for the development and ratification of Wi-Fi standards used to date, to promote the new Wi-Gig specification.

The new Wi-Gig specification provides data transfer rates up to 7 Gbps, far exceeding the maximum 600 Mbps transfer rate of the current 802.11n standard. Such fast transfer rates could easily manage high-definition video and ultimately eliminate the need for wired connections in media applications.

Device connectivity in the 60 GHz band will complement the current family of Wi-Fi technologies. Targeted primarily for applications that require gigabit speeds, 60 GHz products are expected to be used in a wide range of high-performance devices. A significant portion, if not all, of these devices are expected to also support traditional Wi-Fi networking in the 2.4 and 5 GHz bands.
However, the range of the new WiGig spec is notably smaller and may not be sufficient to "blanket a home" according to the Wi-Fi Alliance's marketing director as stated in a Los Angeles Times article. As a result, the organization sees Wi-Gig complementing Wi-Fi rather than replacing it. For example, Wi-Gig could be used to replace HDMI cables to connect between nearby devices.

In partnership with the Wi-Fi Alliance, the Wireless Gigabit Alliance also opened an Adopter Program today to provide consumer electronics companies with royalty-free licenses to create products using the new standard. Products incorporating WiGig could hit the market in the next two years.

Speaking of companies on board to use the WiGig standard, Ali Sadri, the WiGig Alliance's Chairman and President, spoke briefly of Apple to the LA Times:
While Sardi pointed to Apple as an innovator in driving new technology uptake, he wouldn't comment on the company's involvement.
Apple did not provide a comment to the LA Times.

Article Link: Next-Generation Wireless Wi-Gig Specification Published
 

complexcommunic

macrumors regular
Feb 23, 2010
133
0
This is interesting, I don't think I've heard of wi-gig before this... I hope it catches on, it sounds useful.
 

CristobalHuet

macrumors 65816
Jan 18, 2008
1,166
2
Montreal
Think we'll be seeing this capability in the second-gen iPad?

Maybe in the next next iPhone/fifth-gen iPod touch?

Hopefully Macs/AirPorts will get this soon too. :D
 

splashnader

macrumors 6502a
Jul 1, 2008
839
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Via Satellite
I love this. One of my biggest issues with my Internet speed, wifi speed, is that it is difficult to watch HD movies in real time, without having to buffer a large file for a long time.
 

Digitalclips

macrumors 65816
Mar 16, 2006
1,467
31
Sarasota, Florida
Whatever came of the redundant frequencies left from the digital TV transition. Wasn't there some talk of those frequencies being ideal for WiFi and they had great range and penetration.
 

mdriftmeyer

macrumors 68040
Feb 2, 2004
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Pacific Northwest
Perhaps an explanation on how Frequency and Wavelength are inversely proportional in the laws of Physics would help explain to the audience how come the range is so short?
 

bcb23

macrumors member
Jul 15, 2009
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Scottsdale, AZ
"not enough to blanket a home"? Sounds pretty weak. I would want something to replace the "n wireless" I have now, not something to augment it in small areas around my house. Sounds like an early version that needs more marketing analysis for what people want: fast access all over the house/office.
 

KT Walrus

macrumors member
Jul 10, 2008
30
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I'm hoping this standard will replace the DisplayPort for sending Audio/Video to a display (including an HDTV).

It would be cool to have this built into all TVs/Monitors so you could eliminate the wires from my MacBook to my big display. I'd love to have my MacBook sitting in the living room, but have a wireless Display/Keyboard/Mouse set up in my office that is instantly connected to the MacBook (if within range) when I sit down to do some serious work on the web.
 

jayducharme

macrumors 68040
Jun 22, 2006
3,688
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The thick of it
Whatever came of the redundant frequencies left from the digital TV transition. Wasn't there some talk of those frequencies being ideal for WiFi and they had great range and penetration.
There's some info on it here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_television_transition_in_the_United_States

Basically, the frequencies were supposed to herald an era of nationwide long-range WiFi. From what I've read, many (if not all) of the available frequencies have been bought up by Verizon and AT&T. So I guess that you can assume whenever those frequencies are put to use (if they ever are), the WiFi service won't be free.
 

fpnc

macrumors 68000
Oct 30, 2002
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San Diego, CA
I would expect the range on something at 60GHz to be not much more than line-of-sight within the same room. As for the existing 802.11n supporting a "600 Mbps transfer rate," that is pretty much a crock. In theory, the link rate can approach that type of number but when actually going device-to-device data transfers with typical consumer equipment you'll be limited to something around 100Mbps (best case at close range).

I'd guess that the real data throughput on most home setups when running 802.11n is more likely in the 50 to 70Mbps range (when doing more than the simplest room-to-room transfer).
 

al2o3cr

macrumors regular
Oct 14, 2009
210
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Perhaps an explanation on how Frequency and Wavelength are inversely proportional in the laws of Physics would help explain to the audience how come the range is so short?
Wavelength's got nothing to do with it - there's a good reason why the 60GHz band isn't terribly usable. Namely, oxygen molecules have a pronounced absorption peak in that region, so it's useless past a handful of feet anywhere there's AIR.

Wifi actually has a similar situation (2.4GHz is an absorption band of water, thus microwave ovens), but most people's houses are typically *not* filled with water. :)
 

roland.g

macrumors 604
Apr 11, 2005
6,786
2,002
wireless n easily handles all my streaming needs, incl. HD video. Not to mention none of this matters for internet connectivity since no broadband has even come close to catch g speeds yet, they are barely surpassing the b threshold. Sounds very niche, especially with the range limitation.
 

paradox00

macrumors 65816
Sep 29, 2009
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wireless n easily handles all my streaming needs, incl. HD video. Not to mention none of this matters for internet connectivity since no broadband has even come close to catch g speeds yet, they are barely surpassing the b threshold. Sounds very niche, especially with the range limitation.
Sounds like the future to me. HD as we know it today is not the final frontier in video and good luck using using Googles 1Gbps internet over wireless g (or n).
 

Bregalad

macrumors 6502
Jul 22, 2002
414
54
Vancouver
"not enough to blanket a home"? Sounds pretty weak. I would want something to replace the "n wireless" I have now, not something to augment it in small areas around my house. Sounds like an early version that needs more marketing analysis for what people want: fast access all over the house/office.
I already have problems covering my whole house with a single n router (due in part to a large chimney up the middle that effectively blocks everything). 60GHz is going to have an effective range of a few metres at best. No thank you.
 

LagunaSol

macrumors 601
Apr 3, 2003
4,798
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Great. If history can be our guide regarding new tech adoption/approval (802.11n, USB 3, etc.), expect to see Wi-Gig start showing up in our devices in...2032.
 
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