Notarization Required for Mac Apps Created With New Developer IDs Starting in macOS 10.14.5

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Apr 12, 2001
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Apple today released updated developer documentation letting developers know that as of macOS 10.14.5, all new software distributed with a new Developer ID must be notarized in order to run.

Apple plans to make notarization a default requirement for all software in the future.
Beginning in macOS 10.14.5, all new or updated kernel extensions and all software from developers new to distributing with Developer ID must be notarized in order to run. In a future version of macOS, notarization will be required by default for all software.
Notarization is a new concept introduced in macOS Mojave for apps distributed outside of the Mac App Store with the aim of protecting users from malicious Mac apps.

Mac app developers are encouraged to submit their apps to Apple to be notarized, and an Apple-notarized app includes a more streamlined Gatekeeper dialog to reassure users that an app is not known malware.

Apple provides trusted non Mac App Store developers with Developer IDs that are required to allow the Gatekeeper function on macOS to install non Mac App Store apps without extra warnings, but notarization takes it one step further.

With the new requirement in macOS 10.14.5, developers who are new to distributing Mac apps with a Developer ID will need to go through the notarization process for their apps to work on the Mac.

Apple late last year said that it would begin highlighting notarization status "more prominently" starting in spring 2019, and macOS 10.14.5 is apparently the update where that will begin happening.

The notarization process is designed for non Mac App Store apps and is not required for those that are submitted to the Mac App Store. More information on notarization can be found on Apple's developer site.

Article Link: Notarization Required for Mac Apps Created With New Developer IDs Starting in macOS 10.14.5
 

Jul 4, 2015
4,491
2,507
Paris



Apple today released updated developer documentation letting developers know that as of macOS 10.14.5, all new software distributed with a new Developer ID must be notarized in order to run.

Apple plans to make notarization a default requirement for all software in the future.
Notarization is a new concept introduced in macOS Mojave for apps distributed outside of the Mac App Store with the aim of protecting users from malicious Mac apps.

Mac app developers are encouraged to submit their apps to Apple to be notarized, and an Apple-notarized app includes a more streamlined Gatekeeper dialog to reassure users that an app is not known malware.

Apple provides trusted non Mac App Store developers with Developer IDs that are required to allow the Gatekeeper function on macOS to install non Mac App Store apps without extra warnings, but notarization takes it one step further.

With the new requirement in macOS 10.14.5, developers who are new to distributing Mac apps with a Developer ID will need to go through the notarization process for their apps to work on the Mac.

Apple late last year said that it would begin highlighting notarization status "more prominently" starting in spring 2019, and macOS 10.14.5 is apparently the update where that will begin happening.

The notarization process is designed for non Mac App Store apps and is not required for those that are submitted to the Mac App Store. More information on notarization can be found on Apple's developer site.

Article Link: Notarization Required for Mac Apps Created With New Developer IDs Starting in macOS 10.14.5

Very good. Unsigned apps are a very big risk now. Pirate apps have key stroke loggers and spyware to steal your personal data from your computer. Ransomware targeting companies and governments can accidentally or purposefully be installed by employees. This isn’t the 90s anymore. Today’s dangers are life or death.
 
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Internet Enzyme

macrumors 6502a
Feb 21, 2016
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Sounds suspiciously like the last step before requiring Mac apps to be released through the App Store, just like iOS. Slippery slope!
Honestly i think GateKeeper is one of the most annoying piece of **** Mac things. The computer thinks im dumb. I downloaded this app because i want to use it. I do not care what you think macos. Why do you make me go to sys prefs and click through like three dialogs to open an app i willingly downloaded if i get a virus i get a virus so be it
 

cmaier

macrumors G5
Jul 25, 2007
14,064
8,544
California
Honestly i think GateKeeper is one of the most annoying piece of **** Mac things. The computer thinks im dumb. I downloaded this app because i want to use it. I do not care what you think macos. Why do you make me go to sys prefs and click through like three dialogs to open an app i willingly downloaded if i get a virus i get a virus so be it
Most users are dumb.
 

martyjmclean

macrumors 6502
Jan 24, 2018
468
1,622
Sydney, NSW, Australia
Sounds suspiciously like the last step before requiring Mac apps to be released through the App Store, just like iOS. Slippery slope!
If that was going to happen, it would’ve happened in Lion. That’s how long your “slippery slope” is.
[doublepost=1554761641][/doublepost]
Honestly i think GateKeeper is one of the most annoying piece of **** Mac things. The computer thinks im dumb. I downloaded this app because i want to use it. I do not care what you think macos. Why do you make me go to sys prefs and click through like three dialogs to open an app i willingly downloaded if i get a virus i get a virus so be it
You don’t need System Preferences to open an app that Gatekeeper has blocked.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Internet Enzyme

macrumors 6502a
Feb 21, 2016
729
906
If that was going to happen, it would’ve happened in Lion. That’s how long your “slippery slope” is.
[doublepost=1554761641][/doublepost]
You don’t need System Preferences to open an app that Gatekeeper has blocked.
They got rid of the “open anywhere” option in Sierra. Apps from unidentified developers can only be opened through System Preferences. The dialog that appears when you open unidentified software doesnt give you an option to open it from the dialog anymore
 

leman

macrumors G3
Oct 14, 2008
9,990
4,558
While I appreciate privacy and security, this sounds like Apple trying to control what we can and can’t install on our devices. Doesn’t sound good....
And how you you come to that conclusion? You can disable all these security features and Apple provides you with all the official documentation on how to do it. All these tools are simply a way to ensure that software you download doesn’t do anything weird. The notarization step makes perfect sense since there have been precedents of hackers gaining access to source code and injecting malicious code, which then got signed, infecting thousands of machines.

Don’t forget, all of this does not apply to unsigned apps do you have all the freedom you want.
[doublepost=1554764114][/doublepost]
They got rid of the “open anywhere” option in Sierra. Apps from unidentified developers can only be opened through System Preferences. The dialog that appears when you open unidentified software doesnt give you an option to open it from the dialog anymore
Or you can right click, duh.
 

dogslobber

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2014
3,479
4,679
Apple Campus, Cupertino CA
Honestly i think GateKeeper is one of the most annoying piece of **** Mac things. The computer thinks im dumb. I downloaded this app because i want to use it. I do not care what you think macos. Why do you make me go to sys prefs and click through like three dialogs to open an app i willingly downloaded if i get a virus i get a virus so be it
Only techie experts will want to run non-notarized software. For the other 99.852% of macOS users, they'll want to be protected by Apple.
 

martyjmclean

macrumors 6502
Jan 24, 2018
468
1,622
Sydney, NSW, Australia
They got rid of the “open anywhere” option in Sierra. Apps from unidentified developers can only be opened through System Preferences. The dialog that appears when you open unidentified software doesnt give you an option to open it from the dialog anymore
I know that, that’s why you open them via right-click...
 

cmaier

macrumors G5
Jul 25, 2007
14,064
8,544
California
They got rid of the “open anywhere” option in Sierra. Apps from unidentified developers can only be opened through System Preferences. The dialog that appears when you open unidentified software doesnt give you an option to open it from the dialog anymore
Right click and select open
[doublepost=1554767811][/doublepost]
All your personal things belong to us.
What is this even supposed to mean?
 

Eorlas

macrumors 6502a
Feb 10, 2010
588
738
"Mac app developers are encouraged to submit their apps to Apple to be notarized, and an Apple-notarized app includes a more streamlined Gatekeeper dialog to reassure users that an app is not known malware."

No, god please no. Stop this. Dedicate more resources to software and hardware development, not policing applications. I'll figure out what's good to install/not. Thanks
 

lunarworks

macrumors 68000
Jun 17, 2003
1,660
3,787
Toronto, Canada
"Mac app developers are encouraged to submit their apps to Apple to be notarized, and an Apple-notarized app includes a more streamlined Gatekeeper dialog to reassure users that an app is not known malware."

No, god please no. Stop this. Dedicate more resources to software and hardware development, not policing applications. I'll figure out what's good to install/not. Thanks
It's not about "policing". It's about basic checks for malware. Also, not everyone knows how to "figure out what's good to install/not" like you.
 

Shirasaki

macrumors G3
May 16, 2015
9,429
3,443
While I appreciate privacy and security, this sounds like Apple trying to control what we can and can’t install on our devices. Doesn’t sound good....
Yep. And when ARM chip for Mac is released, Apple will lock their system to exactly what they want and ignore all customer requests. I have to say this "users are dumb" mindset works most of the time. Just trash advanced users and leave no option for them. That sounds great. /s
 

BasicGreatGuy

Contributor
Sep 21, 2012
11,688
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In the middle of several books.
Yep. And when ARM chip for Mac is released, Apple will lock their system to exactly what they want and ignore all customer requests. I have to say this "users are dumb" mindset works most of the time. Just trash advanced users and leave no option for them. That sounds great. /s
I don't think it is a matter of Apple thinking users are dumb. I think it is more so a matter of many people wanting, if not expecting Apple to keep them safe from the internet. Many people don't know much about their Mac(s). They just want to turn on the Mac and have it work. I think Apple is trying to protect their brand (hardware and software) by trying to make it more secure.