One day from New Powerbook, What should I do with it?

skeet

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 22, 2005
22
0
When I take out my new powerbook this monday, what should be the first things I do. I am not OS-x proficient, so I want to learn the system. Is there anything that you all would suggest to learn the system, and to enjoy it on the first day I take it out of the box? Thanks for the help...
 

Lacero

macrumors 604
Jan 20, 2005
6,639
2
It's funny you mention not using OSX before. I seem to have forgotten how I learned OSX, but it was fairly intuitive. You'll just pick up on OSX.
 

Littleodie914

macrumors 68000
Jun 9, 2004
1,813
7
Rochester, NY
skeet said:
When I take out my new powerbook this monday, what should be the first things I do. I am not OS-x proficient, so I want to learn the system. Is there anything that you all would suggest to learn the system, and to enjoy it on the first day I take it out of the box? Thanks for the help...
Hmm... I can guarantee you're going to enjoy it when you take it out of the box no matter what! :D A few applications you might want to check out are Quicksilver, Adium, and Konfabulator. Quicksilver is kinda hard to explain... You hit a pre-defined key, type the first few letters of the application or document you're looking for, and bam, there it is. AdiumX is by far the best instant messaging client available for Mac OS X, and is highly customizable. You may or may not like Konfabulator, it's all personal preference. It adds what are called "widgets" to your desktop, such as weather checkers, calendars, etc. Have fun! :cool:
 

DanTekGeek

macrumors 6502
Nov 11, 2004
263
0
Denver, CO
Go to the local bookstore and get "OS X: The Missing Manual". I got the book months before I actually got a Mac, and by the time I finished reading it, I was allready a poweruser.

You should also look and ask around for OS X equivalents of your favorite programs. Good luck and congratulations!
 

jsw

Moderator emeritus
Mar 16, 2004
22,817
37
Andover, MA
I think you're in for a fun ride. I assume you're a Windows user (XP?), and OS X isn't all that different from Windows in terms of most usage. Since the PB doesn't come with a two-button mouse area, remember that holding down 'control' while clicking is the equivalent of a right-mouse click (and, of course, you can always plug in a multi-button mouse - and also, realize that 95% of the Mac pro community thinks the one-button mouse thing is dumb).

I highly recommend picking up "Mac OS X Panther Killer Tips" by Scott Kelby - it contains paragraph-long tips that you can assimilate at your own pace, and you can just flip back and forth and learn things randomly. It's a nice place to pick up some of the cool things.

Also, if you can't figure out how to do something, post here. 95% of the time, someone will answer quickly. If not, bump the post later, and someone will answer then. If all else fails, PM me and I'll answer.

I think one of the biggest differences is that closing a window in OS X doesn't always close the app - it just closes that one window. However, OS X multi-tasks very well, so this isn't a big deal.

And once you open a bunch of windows and apps, enjoy pressing F9, F10, and F11 (the Exposé keys). Great fun.

I think you should probably play for a bit, then post back with any issues.
 

skeet

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 22, 2005
22
0
thanks

I will try these books maybe get them from amazon, the main thing is that I want to know of all the possibilities that I can do on this computer. I only know of one person with a mac, so there is no way for me to learn new things. It would help if yall listed random things that you like to do.
 

Fredstar

macrumors 6502a
Nov 3, 2004
595
0
Near London
http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/10042 - Synergy which is a fab itunes associate, allows you to control your itunes (by skipping tracks, rating, changing volume, play/pause) without being in the itunes app and is well worth the 5 dollars or something. A must have imo.

http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/9633 - Macaroni which is an essential maintenance tool, buy it for again about 5 dollars but it does all the essential maintenance to keep your Powerbook running fast and smoothly.

Osx is really easy and logical to use, i just learnt it in a few days when i got my ibook. Just play around with it, check out the preferences. F9/F10 expose is great, Command-H hides windows while running apps which is great and uses up no cpu. There are loads of other commands that are great :
command-q quits programs
command-, opens preferences
command-m minimises apps e.t.c

Enjoy your Powerbook, i am looking forward to getting mine in about 6 months, in whatever form the Powerbook is then
 

jsw

Moderator emeritus
Mar 16, 2004
22,817
37
Andover, MA
Well, one right-off-the-bat suggestion I have, which I wish I'd thought of when I got my systems and which isn't particularly OS X specific, is this:

Whenever you install any software on your Mac, keep a record of where it came from and any licenses or registration codes involved. Put any such info along with any downloaded *.dmg files (the disk images you'll often get to install apps) in a distinct location (subfolders within, say, an Installed Apps folder). Then back that folder up when it changes. That way, should you ever lose your disk or reformat it or whatever, you can reinstall all the apps that aren't on the disks you got with your PB. And be sure to keep any purchased software disks in one safe place.

Sorry that this isn't a cool OS X tip, but it'll come in handy at some point.
 

jsw

Moderator emeritus
Mar 16, 2004
22,817
37
Andover, MA
One other distinct difference from Windows: there is no registry. When you install an app, typically you just drag it to the Applications folder.

While there is no registry to get all mucked up, there are often files associated with individual apps stored in your /Library/Preferences and /Users/<your_account>/Library/Preferences ("Application Support" folders as well as "Preferences"). Typically, if an app gets buggy, simply deleting (or, more safely, dragging elsewhere) the appropriate *.plist (Preference List) file - which is just an XML file - will clear things up.
 

Applespider

macrumors G4
There was another recent thread about this which you might find a few tips in.
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=108758

If you're coming from Windows, the biggest thing I found to get to used to was not working at full screen. I'd been 'trained' into having all my windows maximised at full screen - even if most of the right side of the screen was white space (in IE) or not needed.

The green maximise button in OS X doesn't maximise things to full screen but to what the developers figured you'd need to see. It means that it's easier to have windows/apps overlapping so that you can drop and drag files more easily or click between apps and see what's happening in them in the background.
 

bousozoku

Moderator emeritus
Jun 25, 2002
13,951
3
Gone but not forgotten.
I would suggest going to the Apple menu in the upper left hand corner and seeing what's there.

You should probably then go to Software update to pull down the latest fixes prior to running anything else. Then, after the re-boot, run it again because there are possibly more that depended on the first group.

After that, head to the Utilities folder with the Applications folder and run Disk Utility. You'll see your drive and the volume "Macintosh Disk". Click on that and first aid, then click on Repair permissions.

You should probably start System Preferences after that and look at the different preference panes. You may want to go to Keyboard and Mouse and enable full keyboard access, since that makes it a bit more like Windows in that you may use various keys, rather than the mouse, to access GUI items.
 

Attachments

Dr. Dastardly

macrumors 65816
Jun 26, 2004
1,317
0
I live in a giant bucket!
jsw said:
And once you open a bunch of windows and apps, enjoy pressing F9, F10, and F11 (the Exposé keys). Great fun.
If you did get a PB with an illuminated keyboard however make sure you press the FN key before you do this. Took me a while to figure this out seeing that I refuse to read manuals. :p
 

skp574

macrumors 6502
Jan 16, 2005
280
0
greenwich.london.uk
Dr. Dastardly said:
If you did get a PB with an illuminated keyboard however make sure you press the FN key before you do this. Took me a while to figure this out seeing that I refuse to read manuals. :p
Me too! Although F11 works on its own.

Like you I refuse to read manuals. What are the standard functions of F8-F10?

Can I map the those keys without have to press the Fn key?
 

inlimbo

macrumors 6502
Jan 29, 2005
411
0
Sydney, Australia
I should get my PB on Tuesday (my first mac - im so sick of waiting!). Should i run down the battery first or should I run the software updates first and then calibrate the battery? What is the very first thing i should do? :confused:

Is it like when u first run XP and u have to install a gig of software updates to make sure the thing doesn't implode (only to find it implodes anyway)?

How should I run the battery down? Transfer a whole lot of MP3s across?

Cheers
inlimbo...
 

Applespider

macrumors G4
Ok - first thing, look in awe and grin like an idiot. Enjoy opening the box too - sounds weird but true

Next, as you go through set up, you'll set up your internet connection (if you want to)

Turn on the firewall (I think it ships with ports closed but firewall off) in System Preferences, Sharing

Then play around a little. Yes, there will be updates to run (found from the Apple Menu/Software Updates) but they're not as critical as the XP ones so it's safe enough to spend time playing rather than sitting watching update bars moving.

As for the battery, it's a 'do in the first day or so' job after your battery has been charged to full charge for several hours. Don't run down your battery doing lots of downloading etc except in small batches since you're going to take your PB to the point it turns itself off and you don't want to lose it then. Play lots of music, play a DVD (even if it's on silent) and try some heavyprocessing applications that require HD access so that it all goes quicker! You're still looking at a 2 hour spell or so.

Most of all - enjoy!
 

killuminati

macrumors 68020
Dec 6, 2004
2,405
0
Last year when I opened up my powerbook and turned it on, it was my first time using OS X. I was dreading having to learn a new OS. I couldnt believe it, I knew just as much about OS X as I did XP after just one day! It was one of the easiest things I have ever learned. It was fun, and exciting :rolleyes:
 

skeet

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 22, 2005
22
0
what about virus protection

I feel like I should immediately get virus protection, is this a good idea? where should i get it at and how much should I pay... free would be nice.

also, will there be instructions to calibrating the battery with the computer, this is the first time I have heard about doing that.
 

inlimbo

macrumors 6502
Jan 29, 2005
411
0
Sydney, Australia
Skeet dw about it. This question was answered in another thread somewhere but here is a quote that I found at AppleTalk Australia http://www.appletalk.com.au/articles/index.php?article=348

"Are there any viruses on Mac OS X?"

That's the easiest question so far. No. To quote from Macworld UK, "more than two years after its introduction, not a single Mac OS X-specific virus has yet appeared", the entire article is at Macworld UK and for further proof. SecureMac.com is a great site for Macintosh security concerns, listing advisories, tips and news related to security on the Mac OS X platform. There is also an article by Richard Forno that compares Mac OS X security to that of Windows XP, check it out here.
Here are two good threads that talk about how u dont need antivirus/firewalls with OSX
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=107826&highlight=virus
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=110075&highlight=virus

I will probably buy Little Snitch as it prevents programs calling home - it works like ZoneAlarm. But im not going to shell out anything for antivirus programs.

With regards to calibrating the battery - Deebster posted a link to Apple's official site with instructions on calibrating the battery above. Here it is again http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=86284
 

Cuckoo

macrumors 6502
May 2, 2003
368
0
The Netherlands - Utrecht
jsw said:
... an always plug in a multi-button mouse - and also, realize that 95% of the Mac pro community thinks the one-button mouse thing is dumb).
Well, might be so, and not to start a yes/no conversation. About two years ago i switched and never used a double mousebutton again. It takes some getting used to, but you don't need two buttons. After you get it, usage makes more sense with 1 button.

And again, those who like two buttons, please use them, just trying to say... in my opinion one buttun is great!!!
 

Phat_Pat

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2004
1,955
0
I Live Where I Live
Cuckoo said:
Well, might be so, and not to start a yes/no conversation. About two years ago i switched and never used a double mousebutton again. It takes some getting used to, but you don't need two buttons. After you get it, usage makes more sense with 1 button.

And again, those who like two buttons, please use them, just trying to say... in my opinion one buttun is great!!!
Yeah but when your editing video its a must.
 

inlimbo

macrumors 6502
Jan 29, 2005
411
0
Sydney, Australia
The thing i think I would miss is the scroll wheel more so than the other button. Do you miss it Cuckoo? I believe the click-able scroll whell is a must when using a tab-browser like Firefox.
 

Cuckoo

macrumors 6502
May 2, 2003
368
0
The Netherlands - Utrecht
inlimbo said:
The thing i think I would miss is the scroll wheel more so than the other button. Do you miss it Cuckoo? I believe the click-able scroll whell is a must when using a tab-browser like Firefox.
Not really, i do do a lot of web-browsing, i just place the pointer on the down-arrow and push the button when i want to scroll down. It took longer to get used to, not having a scrollwheel... that i'd admit to... i imagine those new powerbook scrolling touchpads are quite nifty