One Drop Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit for iPhone Launches on Apple.com

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Health startup One Drop recently launched its iOS-compatible One Drop Chrome Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit on Apple.com for $99.95. Approved by the FDA and CE in Europe, the kit includes a Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose meter, a chrome lancing device, test strips, and a vegan leather carry case.


The blood glucose meter can read results "in just five seconds," transmitting the data to the One Drop iOS app [Direct Link] that users can download on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, and Apple Watch. One Drop's lancing device has custom depth settings to provide the right amount of pressure on a user-by-user basis in order to draw "a perfect drop every time." To keep up on compatible test strips, users can subscribe to One Drop Premium for a monthly $39.95 fee.

With Apple's energetic and consistent focus on health, One Drop provides a premium product that not only meshes well with Apple's design sensibility, but aligns well with their desire to empower users to take control of their health.

Its new Chrome hardware connects to One Drop's iOS, watchOS, and Android apps, and have full HealthKit and CareKit integration, allowing you to sync data from other health apps (e.g., CGMs, bluetooth meters, food & activity trackers) and share your data with your Care Team.
One Drop was one of four apps to launch with Apple's CareKit platform in 2016, including fertility tracker Glow Nurture, maternity app Glow Baby, and depression medication tracker Start. CareKit allows app developers to create integrated software that helps patients and doctors to better track and manage medical conditions.

On Apple.com, the One Drop Monitoring Kit is available for both store pickup and home shipping, with delivery dates listed as early as tomorrow, January 13. For more information on One Drop, check out the company's website here.

Article Link: One Drop Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit for iPhone Launches on Apple.com
 

dwaltwhit

macrumors 6502a
Oct 25, 2013
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This comes across to me as very reasonably priced. 100 bucks once and 40 a month for strips? Even if it isn't covered by insurance, this seems pretty cheap!
 

nodezero

macrumors newbie
Apr 23, 2010
2
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Personally I would rather they open up NFC to other developers so they can support CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor) devices such as the Freestyle Libre, like Android already does.

As an iPhone user, I need to carry around a separate scanner device to scan the patch on my arm that constantly monitors my blood glucose. It's still way easier, less painful, and more informative than finger prick blood tests, but I really should be able to do it with my iPhone given Apple's focus on HealthKit. The shiny chrome design and bluetooth support of this thing can't hide that it's older tech now! :)
 
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kepardue

macrumors 6502
Oct 28, 2006
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I've been using the OneDrop app for a while, and I really want to like it. As a pump-wearing, Dexcom-laden type 1 diabetic of 20 years now, it gets a lot of stuff right that other diabetes apps don't. It let's you specify your basal program to track your insulin intake, for instance. The HealthKit integration means it also reads my BG data generated by my Dexcom to show me trends, but as with many apps that read BG data, it gets a little overwhelmed processing that many readings, just enough to make it too slow to conveniently use to quickly log a meal here and there. So, I'm back to MyNetDiary Diabetes for the moment. If I didn't have the need for the Dexcom though, I would totally be all in on this meter.
 

Glassed Silver

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CE is just a label that is required for pretty much all electronics, its standards are fairly low hence and it's upon the manufacturer to test and label their products as CE-compliant.

Customs will check if a product is CE-labeled, it's nothing health-related and no sign of verified or approved quality, it's just the manufacturer practically ticking the box for "yeah sure I want to sell in the EU".

Glassed Silver:ios
 

yanki01

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Feb 28, 2009
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This comes across to me as very reasonably priced. 100 bucks once and 40 a month for strips? Even if it isn't covered by insurance, this seems pretty cheap!
it is, i used to test about 7-8 times a day before i was on a CGM. my insurance covered 700 strips for $25 every 3 months. NOW pharmacy prescription has gone straight stupid, 30% of the COST and no more than $300 out of pocket/month. i now live off of the samples of strips and insulin from my Doctor thanks to the high pharmacy cost. Since i'm on a CGM, i only test twice a day.
 

Phil A.

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Apr 2, 2006
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This comes across to me as very reasonably priced. 100 bucks once and 40 a month for strips? Even if it isn't covered by insurance, this seems pretty cheap!
I guess that all depends on what they mean by "unlimited strips"

This is what they say about it

Unlimited Test Strips are part of the subscription plan and are meant for you to log your blood glucose using the meter and mobile app to improve your life with diabetes. We base how many we send you on how many you actually use and log in the One Drop | Mobile app.
As long as they have an allowance for failed readings (which happen occasionally, such as not having enough blood in the drop) then it sounds fair to me and the price is pretty good

I'm diabetic but have to fund my own test strips (the NHS only provides strips to people they consider at risk of hypos such as those on insulin and those on certain medication that can cause hypos).

Because of this, I am always open to ways of controlling my spending and must admit an all-in monthly subscription definitely sounds like an attractive option: I'm currently spending around £40 a month (I have previously used a Freestyle Libre but that was costing me £100 a month!), so the price is pretty competitive compared to that (£31.95 a month if you pay month by month or £26.66 if you pay a year in advance)
 

oneMadRssn

macrumors 603
Sep 8, 2011
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Personally I would rather they open up NFC to other developers so they can support CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor) devices such as the Freestyle Libre, like Android already does.

As an iPhone user, I need to carry around a separate scanner device to scan the patch on my arm that constantly monitors my blood glucose. It's still way easier, less painful, and more informative than finger prick blood tests, but I really should be able to do it with my iPhone given Apple's focus on HealthKit. The shiny chrome design and bluetooth support of this thing can't hide that it's older tech now! :)
I am under the impression that CGM is not approved for dosing, and is rather just for informational purposes only. If you get a CGM alert, you're still supposed to test with a traditional monitor prior to dosing. I know many folks don't do that, but its risky. There are issues with the accuracy of CGM. Dexcom just had a huge recall. Dexcom's website also warns of the risks in many places and says that CGM does not replace traditional monitors.
 

Joasp

macrumors newbie
Jan 12, 2017
2
2
Personally I would rather they open up NFC to other developers so they can support CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor) devices such as the Freestyle Libre, like Android already does.

As an iPhone user, I need to carry around a separate scanner device to scan the patch on my arm that constantly monitors my blood glucose. It's still way easier, less painful, and more informative than finger prick blood tests, but I really should be able to do it with my iPhone given Apple's focus on HealthKit. The shiny chrome design and bluetooth support of this thing can't hide that it's older tech now! :)
I could not agree more. I've been fortunate enough to use the Freestyle Libre for about 6 months now, and despite 20 years of diabetes type 1, ive never had better control. Its by far the best thing to happen to me and my diabetes, too bad Apple wont open up their NFC to allow me to control my blood glucose with my iphone. Currently i have to use a third party device, or an android phone - neither of which i really like...! Please apple please!!!
 

lennyeiger

macrumors member
Jan 6, 2015
84
74
Santa Cruz, CA
I fail to see how this is something new.
I have a VerioSync monitor from OneTouch, which is part of Lifescan, part of Johnson and Johnson. It connects to the phone via Bluetooth, it's been out for years. There's an app for the iPhone, where it records the data, tracks all sorts of stuff, gives you charts, etc.

It cost me $29. Test strips are covered by my insurance.
 

JeffyTheQuik

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Aug 27, 2014
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Personally I would rather they open up NFC to other developers so they can support CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor) devices such as the Freestyle Libre, like Android already does.

As an iPhone user, I need to carry around a separate scanner device to scan the patch on my arm that constantly monitors my blood glucose. It's still way easier, less painful, and more informative than finger prick blood tests, but I really should be able to do it with my iPhone given Apple's focus on HealthKit. The shiny chrome design and bluetooth support of this thing can't hide that it's older tech now! :)
Dexcom does this now, and feeds the glucose into the Health App now. Pretty cool, and now that the FDA says that we can use CGM readings for dosing, I think that this new blood checker, cool as it is, may have limited days. Dexcom is also working on a new system that only has to be calibrated once per 7 days, and rumors are that it may go up to 14 days.

Also, the Dexcom uses BT LE for the transmitters, so I can get 30 foot range between me and the phone. I haven't used the Libre, only the Dexcom 7, G4, and G5, and the Minimed Harpoon...errr... CGM from 2007.

Having said all that about CGM, finger sticks are still the 'gold standard'.
[doublepost=1484239734][/doublepost]
I fail to see how this is something new.
I have a VerioSync monitor from OneTouch, which is part of Lifescan, part of Johnson and Johnson. It connects to the phone via Bluetooth, it's been out for years. There's an app for the iPhone, where it records the data, tracks all sorts of stuff, gives you charts, etc.

It cost me $29. Test strips are covered by my insurance.
That's the hard part for other companies, and this new one is a boon for those whose strips aren't covered. Lifescan has a death grip on insurance companies, as I've been with a few, and they seem to be in all the formularies as a cheapy prescription, and anything other brand seems to be a 'premium' brand, and visiting the local Walgreens doesn't offer much rationale to those decisions
 
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keithdoc

macrumors member
Nov 23, 2016
39
32
Wonder if this device is FDA compliant for home use of measuring blood glucose - with a 30% margin of error within a narrowly specified range?

There's definitely a market here, but it needs to be a significant improvement in functionality, not just a shiny new connected case.
 

aslater18

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Sep 26, 2002
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JeffyTheQuik

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I am under the impression that CGM is not approved for dosing, and is rather just for informational purposes only. If you get a CGM alert, you're still supposed to test with a traditional monitor prior to dosing. I know many folks don't do that, but its risky. There are issues with the accuracy of CGM. Dexcom just had a huge recall. Dexcom's website also warns of the risks in many places and says that CGM does not replace traditional monitors.
It is now, since 12/22/16.

https://asweetlife.org/fda-approves-dexcom-g5-cgm-for-insulin-dosing/

I'm still old school, and if something doesn't feel right, I poke my finger.
 

afowler63

macrumors newbie
Feb 8, 2012
3
1
I am a type 3c (LADA Type 1) and I have used this app for about 6 months now and the meter for a month. For a new diabetic one of the features of the One Drop Premium is access to a CDE 24/7 via a chat system as well as lessons on everything from diet, activity and various health issues a diabetic is faced with. I have a high deductible insurance which makes a CGM cost prohibitive. I was using the verio strips but was limited to 150 strips a month. With the unlimited you can test more often and at a cheaper price. More testing will give a clearer picture of whats going on. The app also has a food library which makes it easier to log your carbs and adjust the bolus injection.
 
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coolbreeze

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Jan 20, 2003
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CE is just a label that is required for pretty much all electronics, its standards are fairly low hence and it's upon the manufacturer to test and label their products as CE-compliant.

Customs will check if a product is CE-labeled, it's nothing health-related and no sign of verified or approved quality, it's just the manufacturer practically ticking the box for "yeah sure I want to sell in the EU".

Glassed Silver:ios
Reminds me of the off-brand chargers that tout an "intelligent chip to prevent overcharging." It's not that special if every .99 charger has this special smart chip. Just a marketing blurb to make you think it's neat-o.
 
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lennyeiger

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Jan 6, 2015
84
74
Santa Cruz, CA
That's the hard part for other companies, and this new one is a boon for those whose strips aren't covered. Lifescan has a death grip on insurance companies, as I've been with a few, and they seem to be in all the formularies as a cheapy prescription, and anything other brand seems to be a 'premium' brand, and visiting the local Walgreens doesn't offer much rationale to those decisions
I own't say anything nice about Johnson and Johnson or Lifescan. I can only say that with Obamacare, here in California, I pay $5 for 400 test strips. Lasts me months. All those Governors of the red states really screwed their people by rejecting it.
 
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Glassed Silver

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Reminds me of the off-brand chargers that tout an "intelligent chip to prevent overcharging." It's not that special if every .99 charger has this special smart chip. Just a marketing blurb to make you think it's neat-o.
It's not a marketing blurb.

I think that MR is highlighting this more than necessary.

In fact, it's like saying the new iPhone will meet FCC standards. Yeah well no ****, they have no choice, it's on the same level of noteworthiness.
(even though with the FCC there is independent control, but that's not relevant for this example)

Glassed Silver:ios
 

JeffyTheQuik

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Aug 27, 2014
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What about Lancets? How are those handled with this system?
They get changed once every 4-6 months, so that's a pretty small cost... ;)
[doublepost=1484251424][/doublepost]
I own't say anything nice about Johnson and Johnson or Lifescan. I can only say that with Obamacare, here in California, I pay $5 for 400 test strips. Lasts me months. All those Governors of the red states really screwed their people by rejecting it.
While I appreciate you getting $600 (retail) of test strips for $5, someone is paying that other $595 (again, retail). I'm sure that if "Obamacare" is repealed, the good people of California will happily make a better version, like that red state governor, Mitt Romney, did in Massachusetts, and not inflict it on the rest of the 49 States.

As for the math, it's probably something like this:
$600 - 4 boxes of 100 strips
-$300 discount, as they're bought in bulk
-$295 from the "insurance" company, but really the people that pay the premiums*

Oh yeah, those "Red State Governors" that "screwed their people" were re-elected, or another "Red State Governor" took their place, or even more shocking, in 2010 there were 23 "Red State" governors, and now there are 34 of them. But then again, that's the beauty of a Federal system. If you like your plan in your state, you can keep that plan in your state.

*whether it is those that pay a check or a subsidy, which, in that case, is the taxpayers.
 
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Buran

macrumors 6502
Oct 22, 2007
390
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Ordered one; I hope this will serve me well and make it easier to share data with my endocrinologist. I don't always wear my CGM, and when I don't it's hard to let them know what my manual test results were.

Glucose meters are eligible for FSA reimbursement, so this is a good use of half of the remaining funds from 2016's FSA. I'll have to decide whether to pay for the test strips via FSA as well (that's also an eligible expense) or pay out of pocket, but either way, the cost for this is about the same as what I pay now for lancets and test strips through an ongoing prescription. If it doesn't work out, I can always use my current meter.

As for lancing devices, the cost for those is trivial. It's always been the case that the test strips are the profit center. And, unfortunately, every meter uses a different type of test strip so it's impossible to buy a generic strip that works with brand-name meters. It's disgusting. At least this meter has a flat-rate monthly price for whatever number of test strips you need, and the amount you get is the amount you actually need/use. I looked at my copay history and the comparison is favorable for me.

According to the FAQ, the lancing device uses generic lancets. That's something that'll cost less than the meter I've got now, as I'm not sure that generic lancets work with its lancing device. You can get a box of generic lancets (commonly 100 per box) for a few dollars at most major pharmacies, and not everyone replaces the lancet with each test so each box can last a long time. (Not advised, but people do it). Lancets do not require a prescription to purchase.

The no-prescription-required deal here is also good. I do maintain prescriptions for the medications I use and I do easily get prescription renewals from my clinic, but not having to have one is one less hassle to remember to handle.
[doublepost=1484264247][/doublepost]
Dexcom does this now, and feeds the glucose into the Health App now. Pretty cool, and now that the FDA says that we can use CGM readings for dosing, I think that this new blood checker, cool as it is, may have limited days. Dexcom is also working on a new system that only has to be calibrated once per 7 days, and rumors are that it may go up to 14 days.

Also, the Dexcom uses BT LE for the transmitters, so I can get 30 foot range between me and the phone. I haven't used the Libre, only the Dexcom 7, G4, and G5, and the Minimed Harpoon...errr... CGM from 2007.

Having said all that about CGM, finger sticks are still the 'gold standard'.
[doublepost=1484239734][/doublepost]
That's the hard part for other companies, and this new one is a boon for those whose strips aren't covered. Lifescan has a death grip on insurance companies, as I've been with a few, and they seem to be in all the formularies as a cheapy prescription, and anything other brand seems to be a 'premium' brand, and visiting the local Walgreens doesn't offer much rationale to those decisions
I have a Verio meter now and I haven't been happy with its app or its sharing options. My copay is similar to yours, but the particular meter I am using right now doesn't work with generic lancets to the best of my knowledge. Keeping roughly the same monthly cost for the amount of test strips I need with better app support and better sharing is personally worth it for me.

I did once try to switch to a different brand of meter, but my insurer refused to cover it as it wasn't a OneTouch meter. That bothered me, as I think I should be free to use whatever meter I'd like to use as long as it meets FDA requirements as all such meters are required to do. Why is one meter okay but another is not?

I've also had this problem with some medications, and now I have to use one that is painful to administer instead of another that was painless because my insurer refused to cover the painless one and out of pocket it was hundreds of dollars. Both treat the same condition, are FDA approved for the same "label", and have the same effect/results. I never got a satisfactory explanation, either.
 
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