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Opera today is releasing a substantial update to its two-and-a-half-year-old Opera Touch mobile browsing app.

opera-mobile-browser-2021-update.jpg

Now titled simply "Opera," the revamped version features a "neater and flatter design" that aims to reflect its lightweight underpinnings and its status as a minimalist app that promises users a fast and secure browsing experience.
The revamp of the user interface in Opera also unveils a neater and flatter design that gives the browser a more refined appearance than before. The new-look replaces the diagonal background pattern, initially introduced into Opera Touch, with flat surfaces and removing shadows on bubbles and other elements.
New icons have been added in the bottom bar and the floating Fast Action button, which users can touch to access a radial menu and swipe through several one-handed actions with their thumb.

The browser also includes a feature called Flow that uses a QR code to securely link the iOS app with the Mac, allowing users to share links, notes, images, files, and other information over a secure and private connection, no logins required.

In addition, Opera comes with a built-in Ethereum wallet, built-in ad blocking, and protection against disguised online cryptocurrency mining, or "cryptojacking".

Opera says its iOS user base increased by over 65% in the 12 months to February, and believes that the growth has been partly thanks to Apple's decision to let users choose a default browser in iOS 14.

Opera is available for iPhone and iPad in several languages and can be downloaded directly from the App Store. [Direct Link]

Article Link: Opera's Minimalist Mobile Browser Gets a Design Overhaul
 

ruka.snow

macrumors 68000
Jun 6, 2017
1,639
4,360
Scotland
... a company that also has to obey EU legislation. Doesn't mean I'd trust either of them with my data.

If you can't trust a EU company that has absolutely no interest in collecting your personal data and spying on you I have no idea who you would trust. I could understand if it we were talking about Google or Facebook, but this is Opera. EU companies have very strict data collecting policies and if you were worried you could do a subject access request and data deletion request that would cost them a significant amount of money if they failed to comply. Opera are also not allowed to transfer data to China, but can transfer it to the USA(where it could become unsafe). As long as they are not transferring your data to the USA I wouldn't be worried in the slightest.
 

Captain Trips

macrumors demi-god
Jun 13, 2020
1,614
5,410
"Opera. That is a name I have not heard in a long time. A long time."

Shamelessly stolen form Star Wars: A New Hope (or just Star Wars for those who saw it in the theater before the episode number & name were used).
 

dukeblue219

macrumors regular
Dec 18, 2012
201
325
Opera, you had your chance when Firefox knocked down IE. You had your chance when Chrome and Safari knocked down Firefox. You had your chance when (Chromium) Edge started killing off Chrome. It's not going to happen for you, sorry.
 
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Westwood_1

macrumors newbie
Jan 20, 2021
7
23
The marriage between the Chinese government and Chinese tech companies is a terrible thing. I have no trust in Opera to abide by EU regulations, simply because I think Opera has an even more demanding governmental interest at home.

It's a shame, too. Opera had some unique features (built-in VPN, mouse gestures, data-saving mode, built-in adblocker) that I really liked.
 

ruka.snow

macrumors 68000
Jun 6, 2017
1,639
4,360
Scotland
Chrome big time. Like I’m going to trust China.

Opera is as much to do with China as any other company with outside investors. It is still developed in the EU and still has to abide by EU law which is much stricter than the USA... the USA has almost no protections and this is why you have Facebook and Google knowing everything about you.
 

dukeblue219

macrumors regular
Dec 18, 2012
201
325
Thought about trying Edge? Microsoft's probably not as evil as Google when it comes to data collection.

If you're on a Mac, Safari's a solid option too (which is my own preference).
Highly recommend the new Edge for Windows users. It's fully compatible with Chrome (add-ons, passwords, imports, etc) but seems to just work better. Plus, I spread my information sharing between Apple, Microsoft, Google, equally so maybe they don't all have the full picture?
 

Unggoy Murderer

macrumors 6502a
Jan 28, 2011
615
1,825
Edinburgh, UK
Opera is as much to do with China as any other company with outside investors. It is still developed in the EU and still has to abide by EU law which is much stricter than the USA... the USA has almost no protections and this is why you have Facebook and Google knowing everything about you.
With respect, I don't think you understand how the EU's legislation / directives (particularly around the GDPR) work.

What the GDPR sets out is at a high level the following:
  1. There must be informed consent to subject data collection / processing
  2. When data is stored on a data subject, it must be in accordance with the directive, and local laws / customs (in the UK for example, it's implemented in law under the Data Protection Act 2018)
  3. Data subject has right to request data access, edits, deletions, in a timely, fair manner.
  4. Lots more around data transmission, retention periods, encryption at rest, etc.
With that in mind, there is absolutely nothing wrong (lawfully) with Google, Facebook and the like collecting all and anything about you as long as they are in accordance with the GDPR. Nothing in the GDPR says that these companies can't mine the living daylights out of your data after you've consented. It does not mean that your data will be treated with respect, or any morals.

Facebook and Google have far more to lose if they don't play ball around the GDPR (and rightly so), however Chinese firms - can and have - effectively ignored it, just like all other laws and regulations (especially around copyrights, designs and patents).

(In addition, don't confuse EU law with regulations, directives, and decisions. The GDPR is a directive, not law.)
 

ruka.snow

macrumors 68000
Jun 6, 2017
1,639
4,360
Scotland
Facebook and Google have far more to lose if they don't play ball around the GDPR (and rightly so), however Chinese firms - can and have - effectively ignored it, just like all other laws and regulations (especially around copyrights, designs and patents).

We aren't talking about GDPR and we aren't talking about a Chinese company. Opera's HQ is still in Europe and they are still a European company. The parent company and investment may come from a Chinese company, but nothing suggests they are changing the direction of Opera into a data harvesting company and I doubt Opera's engineers would put in such rubbish. Opera has a long track record of being a respectful company, they aren't a Google or Facebook.
 

Unggoy Murderer

macrumors 6502a
Jan 28, 2011
615
1,825
Edinburgh, UK
We aren't talking about GDPR and we aren't talking about a Chinese company. Opera's HQ is still in Europe and they are still a European company. The parent company and investment may come from a Chinese company, but nothing suggests they are changing the direction of Opera into a data harvesting company and I doubt Opera's engineers would put in such rubbish. Opera has a long track record of being a respectful company, they aren't a Google or Facebook.
They're a Norwegian company, not European. They are based in Europe, and it's likely their engineers will do whatever they're told to do, or face dismissal.

Folks won't make $575m investments and not expect something in return. The investment alone from a shady investor consortium is more than enough to deter me from ever using their products again.

EU companies have very strict data collecting policies and if you were worried you could do a subject access request and data deletion request that would cost them a significant amount of money if they failed to comply
Quoted from you previously, this is almost entirely legislated through the GDPR.
 

jimimac71

macrumors member
Sep 21, 2019
93
31
California
The only reason I don't have an iPad is no one has word wrap in their browser. I have an Amazon 10 inch tablet and use the Opera for Android browser because I can zoom in and it word wraps automatically. I often zoom as much as 10x and everything simply wraps around. No other Opera version does so, namely the iPhone/iPad versions.
If that is different now, Apple has a new customer.
 
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