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Parallels Desktop 17 was released today, bringing native support for Windows 11 and macOS Monterey to both Intel and Apple silicon Macs, as well as a range of performance and compatibility improvements.

parallels-17.jpg

It's worth noting from the off that the versions of Windows that Parallels 17 can run on an M1 Mac are currently limited to the Insider Previews for Windows 10 and Windows 11, due to their compatibility with ARM-based hardware. However, Parallels has promised that when Windows 11 is officially released to the public, the virtualization software will be able to run it.

With that caveat, for both M1 and Intel systems, Parallels 17 resumes Windows and Linux up to 38% faster compared to the previous version, and benefits from a sixfold increase in OpenGL graphics processing and up to a 25% improvement in 2D graphics performance, according to the company.

If you're running it on an Apple silicon machine, expect 33% faster Windows startup times, up to 20% better disk performance on Windows 10 Insider Preview, and up to 28% faster DirectX 11 performance.

Elsewhere, Parallels has improved its Coherence mode, which lets you run a windows app without launching the full virtual machine. Coherence will now window shutdowns, updates, and sign-in screens, while drag-and-drop between Windows and Mac apps has been enhanced, with support for dragging text and images between windows, including support for Quick Notes in Monterey.

M1 users can also now use BitLocker and Secure Boot thanks to a virtualized TPM (Trusted Platform Module) chip. Windows 10 will also recognize macOS battery status and turn on battery saving mode when your Mac runs low on battery.

Parallels Desktop 17 has moved entirely to a subscription model, which means the standard edition costs $79.99 per year, while Pro and Business Editions are available for $99.99 per year. Users who purchased a perpetual license for an earlier version of Parallels Desktop can upgrade to Parallels Desktop 17 for $49.99. A free trial is available to download from the Parallels website.

Article Link: Parallels 17 Brings Windows 11 and macOS Monterey Virtualization Support, Improved Graphics, M1 Optimizations, and More
 
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The Mercurian

macrumors 68020
Mar 17, 2012
2,095
2,362
This having to buy a new version or upgrade every year is getting ridiculous.

Ahhh not a big fan of Subscription licenses which start at $79.99.

I greatly dislike subscription models, but in this case at least its more honest than their paid updates to use the next MacOS every year - you now know from the start you should pay every year.
 

RStolpe

macrumors 6502
Jan 19, 2019
440
234
Sweden
I greatly dislike subscription models, but in this case at least its more honest than their paid updates to use the next MacOS every year - you now know from the start you should pay every year.
The upgrade is only around 45USD so for me that already has a licens that I update when I need to it's great price range and I don't need to update every year even.
 

yellow8

macrumors 6502
Mar 14, 2017
379
556
This is the only issue I had with my M1 mac: windows virtualization for a work-project. I almost considered buying an intel-mac just for that. But I left the project instead... and got back to my apps.
 
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sudo-sandwich

macrumors regular
Aug 5, 2021
170
125
I feel virtualization of Windows on a Mac is becoming more and more an old fashioned niche.
Yep, it's true. The lines between the OSs are going away thanks to the web, except in some cases you just need Windows, and evidently that market is still large enough.
 
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theorist9

macrumors 6502a
May 28, 2015
981
521
That's true but for some software it's needed. I'm using for example CalMan and Colorspace to calibrate displays and TV's and they only run in Windows sadly.
I'm guessing many of the niche apps for which people need Windows are x86-only. I.e., they aren't available as native ARM versions. If you run them on an Apple Silicon machine using Parallels, you'll be running them in Windows-for-ARM. 32-bit x86 apps can run on Windows-for-ARM through an emulation layer MS has built. [Last time I checked, there was no emulation for 64-bit x86 apps, but maybe that's changed.]

So, in summary, to run a 32-bit x86 Windows app on an Apple Silicon Mac, you'll have to go through both an emulation layer to get it running in Windows 11 for ARM, and then a virtualization layer to get it running on the Mac. I'm curious how well that will work (maybe it will be OK if the app isn't demanding).

If you have a 64-bit x86 Windows app, you may be out of luck (for Apple Silicon).
 

IKAR0S

macrumors newbie
Aug 26, 2012
22
5
M1 macs run x86 version of Windows or ARM version of Windows ?
If it’s ARM version of windows it’s a no go for me.
 

henrikhelmers

macrumors member
Nov 22, 2017
71
99
I am happy this exists. Wish it was slightly more refined for Linux. I used VirtualBox when on Intel and it was less pleasant. Performance on Windows is good after this update. More speed than I need. The M1 is just a fantastic chip. Can't believe what my fanless MacBook Air is capable of.
 
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sudo-sandwich

macrumors regular
Aug 5, 2021
170
125
I'm guessing many of the niche apps for which people need Windows are x86-only. I.e., they aren't available as native ARM versions. If you run them on an Apple Silicon machine using Parallels, you'll be running them in Windows-for-ARM. 32-bit x86 apps can run on Windows-for-ARM through an emulation layer MS has built. [Last time I checked, there was no emulation for 64-bit x86 apps, but maybe that's changed.]

So, in summary, to run a 32-bit x86 Windows app on an Apple Silicon Mac, you'll have to go through both an emulation layer to get it running in Windows 11 for ARM, and then a virtualization layer to get it running on the Mac. I'm curious how well that will work (maybe it will be OK if the app isn't demanding).

If you have a 64-bit x86 Windows app, you may be out of luck (for Apple Silicon).
So it works, you're saying, just might be slow. That's probably fine. The nice thing about abandonware is it's made for old hardware, so even through whatever compatibility layers you need to run it, it's faster than what existed back then :D
 

theorist9

macrumors 6502a
May 28, 2015
981
521
Yep, it's true. The lines between the OSs are going away thanks to the web, except in some cases you just need Windows, and evidently that market is still large enough.
While that may be true for content consumption (the lines between OS's going away), I don't find it's the case for serious content creation, where you have many windows open and need to navigate among multiple heavy-duty applications. For that type of work I've personally found it a pain to use web-based apps.
 
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theorist9

macrumors 6502a
May 28, 2015
981
521
So it works, you're saying, just might be slow. That's probably fine. The nice thing about abandonware is it's made for old hardware, so even through whatever compatibility layers you need to run it, it's faster than what existed back then :D
I don't know how well it will work. I've read MS's 32 bit x86->ARM emulator works (though its pretty slow), but don't know if the combination of emulation and virtualization will create issues.
 

sudo-sandwich

macrumors regular
Aug 5, 2021
170
125
I don't know how well it will work. I've read MS's 32 bit x86->ARM emulator works (though its pretty slow), but don't know if the combination of emulation and virtualization will create issues.
It should work fine in theory since running in the VM makes no real difference, but yes, we'd have to see it.
 

RStolpe

macrumors 6502
Jan 19, 2019
440
234
Sweden
As a developer I do still need some VM's on my local computer to work with, In my case Windows 11 ARM are going to cut it. If I need any other things I just run it upp in my companys VMware Horizon environment.
 
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amaze1499

macrumors 6502
Oct 16, 2014
498
370
This having to buy a new version or upgrade every year is getting ridiculous.
True, I also think this subscription model is questionable. On the other hand, Parallels itself is a decent product for those who prefer this kind of solution. From my trial experience it just worked.
 

Rygaard

macrumors member
Jun 24, 2010
78
47
Denmark
Wondering if there is a future for parallels - since next month you can buy windows in from microsoft cloud as streaming.

if i remember correct it would start at 11$ pr. month...(not sure about the price) - I am not arguing that this will be the end of all Parallels business cases, but surely some of them
 
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